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I want to get the length of a table (by which I mean the number of elements in an array) in COBOL. The convention I have seen is typically to hard-code it to match the occurrences in working storage. But I want the code to get the length, so that if the working storage is changed and the program recompiled, then the procedure division statements do no need to be changed. This is both to reduce maintenance effort, and prevent just "missing" a use in the 5000 lines of code, and potentially to allow the code to be in a copycode that could be used in multiple programs that have different table lengths.

So here is the only solution I have come up with.

IDENTIFICATION DIVISION.
PROGRAM-ID. TESTPROG.
DATA DIVISION.
WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.
01 THIS-LENGTH    PIC 9(04).
01 THIS-GROUP.
   05 THIS-TABLE  PIC X(20) OCCURS 15 TIMES.
PROCEDURE DIVISION.

    COMPUTE THIS-LENGTH = LENGTH OF THIS-GROUP
                         / LENGTH OF THIS-TABLE.
     DISPLAY LENGTH OF THIS-GROUP ' / ' LENGTH OF THIS-TABLE
             ' = ' THIS-LENGTH.
 EXIT-PROG.
     STOP RUN.

And this outputs

000000300 / 000000020 = 0015

So that works, but it's pretty clunky. It requires a dummy group level around the rows, just to get the length of them. Is there a better way to do this?

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6  
Your approach is about as good as it gets. COBOL is a clunky language, but for the most part it works pretty well. Your best defence against getting table sizes out of sync across programs is to use COPYBOOKs to hold their definitions and then, as you have done, dynamically determine the size at run time using LENGTH OF. – NealB Apr 12 '12 at 20:28
1  
But... the array length is right there! "OCCURS 15 TIMES" ;) ... also you should put your solution as the answer so we can vote for it :) – Jeff Bridgman Sep 27 '12 at 21:41
    
Thanks for coming back to the question. If you look here, ibm.com/developerworks/rfe/…, you'll find an RFE (Request for Enhancement) for Enterprise COBOL to include user-defined constants (as per the 2014 COBOL Standard). You should vote for it, it would provide the equivalent resolution to Micro Focus's 78s. – Bill Woodger Jul 31 '15 at 17:53
    
@BillWoodger thanks for the info, I did go and upvote it; that would be nice to have – Abacus Jul 31 '15 at 19:14
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would use a 78 item for the size and use it in the OCCURS and then if you want to make this size externally controlled you can add some conditional statements around it...

The vanilla portable example would be:

  WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.
  78 THIS-TABLE-SIZE VALUE 15.

   01 THIS-LENGTH    PIC 9(04).
   01 THIS-TABLE     PIC X(20) OCCURS THIS-TABLE-SIZE TIMES.
   PROCEDURE DIVISION.
      DISPLAY THIS-TABLE-SIZE.

However using $if.. the example would be:

  WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.
  $if THIS-TABLE-SIZE defined
  $display THIS-TABLE-SIZE is changed
  $else
   78 THIS-TABLE-SIZE VALUE 15.
  $end

   01 THIS-LENGTH    PIC 9(04).
   01 THIS-TABLE     PIC X(20) OCCURS THIS-TABLE-SIZE TIMES.
   PROCEDURE DIVISION.
      DISPLAY THIS-TABLE-SIZE.

Then the default compiled/run would yield:

Y:\DemoAndTests\size.of>cobol testprog.cbl nologo int();
* Generating testprog
* Data:         800     Code:         464     Literals:         144

Y:\DemoAndTests\size.of>run testprog
15

But if the constant is set...

Y:\DemoAndTests\size.of>cobol testprog.cbl nologo int() constant"THIS-TABLE-SIZE(20)";
THIS-TABLE-SIZE is changed
* Generating testprog
* Data:         896     Code:         464     Literals:         144

Y:\DemoAndTests\size.of>run testprog
20

I would also consider moving the 78 level to a copybook.

share|improve this answer
    
Not all Cobols have 78-levels available no have conditional comiler directives nor allow the use of a dataname in a definition. – Bill Woodger Jan 18 '13 at 9:22
    
Very true but if your compiler does and you do have any coding restrictions why you can't use it.. then its an option. – Stephen Gennard Jan 18 '13 at 10:37
    
Sure, you got it, flaunt it. As long as you won't need to "migrate" it somewhere. Just though it might have been useful to include in the post itself... – Bill Woodger Jan 19 '13 at 0:47
    
I like the 78 level answer in theory, but yes I am in a z/OS mainframe environment where there is no 78-level . Otherwise your first code sample answer seems perfect. Since I did not specify my environment, and there doesn't seem to be a better answer, marking as correct. – Abacus Jul 31 '15 at 15:53

I find it curious to describe it as a "dummy group level". I define like this:

05  DELIBERATE-DUMMY-GROUP.
    10  FILLER OCCURS 15 TIMES.
        15  ACTUAL-ENTRY-NAME PIC X(20).

Often following that would be

05  SOMETHING-ELSE PIC something.

If you have

05  ACTUAL-ENTRY-NAME OCCURS 15 TIMES PIC X(20).
05  SOMETHING-ELSE PIC something.

You could

Define

01  W-ADDRESS-OF-TABLE USAGE POINTER.
01  FILLER REDEFINES W-ADDRESS-OF-TABLE.
    05  W-AOT-AS-NUMBER COMP-5 PIC 9(9).
01  W-ADDRESS-OF-AFTER-TABLE USAGE POINTER.
01  FILLER REDEFINES W-ADDRESS-OF-AFTER-TABLE.
    05  W-AOAT-AS-NUMBER COMP-5 PIC 9(9).

SET W-ADDRESS-OF-TABLE TO ADDRESS OF ACTUAL-ENTRY-NAME ( 1 )
SET W-ADDRESS-OF-AFTER-TABLE TO ADDRESS OF SOMETHING-ELSE

SUBTRACT W-AOT-AS-NUMBER FROM W-AOAT-AS-NUMBER
  GIVING W-LENGTH-OF-TABLE
DIVIDE W-LENGTH-OF-TABLE BY LENGTH OF ACTUAL-ENTRY-NAME
  GIVING W-NO-OF-OCCURENCES

But I'd prefer to have the OCCURS as part of a group.

Note: The above will no longer work if a field is inserted before "SOMETHING-ELSE" without changing the code to use the new field. It will also not work with SYNC if you happen to have that for your field (and it is actually "needed").

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