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With this code (listApplications is a ListView control):

    private void ShowApplicationPropertiesForm() {
        String FullPath = String.Empty; 
        String Title = String.Empty;
        String Description = String.Empty;
        Boolean Legacy = false;
        Boolean Production = false;
        Boolean Beta = false;
        MyCustomListViewItemDescendant lvi = (MyCustomListViewItemDescendant)listApplications.SelectedItems[0];
        FullPath = lvi.ExePath;
        Title = lvi.Text;
        Description = lvi.ToolTipText;

        ApplicationProperties ap = new ApplicationProperties(
            FullPath,
            Title,
            Description,
            Legacy,
            Production,
            Beta);
        ap.Show();
    }


//overloaded form constructor
public ApplicationProperties(String AFullPath, String ATitle, String ADescription, Boolean ALegacy, Boolean AProduction, Boolean ABeta) {
            this.Text = String.Format("{0} Properties", ATitle);
            textBoxFullPath.Text = AFullPath;
            textBoxTitle.Text = ATitle;
            textBoxDescription.Text = ADescription;
            checkBoxLegacy.Checked = ALegacy;
            checkBoxProduction.Checked = AProduction;
            checkBoxBeta.Checked = ABeta;
        }

...I'm getting, "System.NullReferenceException was unhandled Message=Object reference not set to an instance of an object."

Stepping through it, the line that bombs is:

textBoxFullPath.Text = AFullPath;

textBoxFullPath is a Textbox on a form; AFullPath has a valid value of the sort: "Q:\What\AreYou\Gonna\Do\BabyBlue.exe"

Updated:

Partially solved.

It was the old "Premature Assignment" problem. By moving the assignments from the constructor to the Load() event, it no longer bombs (code below).

HOWEVER, now nothing is displaying on the form at runtime...???!?

public partial class ApplicationProperties : Form {
        String _fullPath = String.Empty;
        String _title = String.Empty;
        String _description = String.Empty;
        Boolean legacy = false;
        Boolean production = false;
        Boolean beta = false;

        public ApplicationProperties() {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        public ApplicationProperties(String AFullPath, String ATitle, String ADescription, Boolean ALegacy, Boolean AProduction, Boolean ABeta) {
            _fullPath = AFullPath;
            _title = ATitle;
            _description = ADescription;
            legacy = ALegacy;
            production = AProduction;
            beta = ABeta;
            this.CenterToScreen();
        }

        private void ApplicationProperties_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) {
            //this.Text = String.Format("{0} Properties", _title);          
            Text = String.Format("{0} Properties", _title);
            textBoxFullPath.Text = _fullPath;
            textBoxTitle.Text = _title;
            textBoxDescription.Text = _description;
            checkBoxLegacy.Checked = legacy;
            checkBoxProduction.Checked = production;
            checkBoxBeta.Checked = beta;
        }

Updated again:

Adding "InitializeComponent();" to the overloaded constructor did the trick - thanks, SW!

share|improve this question
    
Where are you initializing textBoxFullPath? –  James Johnson Apr 12 '12 at 20:05
3  
Is your form created with Visual Studio? If so, you need to add the call to InitializeComponent() to create the TextBox and other UI elements. –  Steve Wong Apr 12 '12 at 20:07
    
@JJ: You mean to String.Empty? Habit. It probably doesn't help, but I don't see how it could hurt. –  B. Clay Shannon Apr 12 '12 at 20:16
    
@ClayShannon - I think JJ means where are you instantiating textBoxFullPath (ie, textBoxFullPath = new TextBox();). This happens in your ApplicationProperties.Designer.cs file within the InitializeComponent() method. –  Steve Wong Apr 12 '12 at 20:19
    
@Steve Wong: Yes, adding that to the constructor made it work; thanks! –  B. Clay Shannon Apr 12 '12 at 20:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the designer always calls the parameterless constructor, so I've gravitated to no trying to make my own constructors for WinForm Forms.

See my suggestions to tweak below - if you don't get to where you want, let me know and I'll update.

    public ApplicationProperties(String AFullPath, String ATitle, String ADescription, Boolean ALegacy, Boolean AProduction, Boolean ABeta)
        : this() // --> Call the parameterless constructor before executing this code
    { 
        _fullPath = AFullPath; 
        _title = ATitle; 
        _description = ADescription; 
        legacy = ALegacy; 
        production = AProduction; 
        beta = ABeta; 
        this.CenterToScreen(); // --> Maybe move this to the Shown event (not sure if you need to)
    } 
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, adding the ": this() " calling the parameterless constructor caused my assignments not to show up (the controls display, but they have no text in them). It works without it, though. –  B. Clay Shannon Apr 12 '12 at 20:29
    
i think the thing that actually solves your root problem is just calling InitializeComponent() - I was trying to get you to not have it repeated twice, but it's a fine point. –  Aaron Anodide Apr 12 '12 at 20:36

I'm new to C#, so please forgive me if I am wrong.

On MSDN, it says that the error you're getting is due to wrong reference, so, in your case, I guess textBoxFullPath might not exist (you should check the spelling).

But here, it's something about file streams, and since you're using paths, this may help you. (check the first answer).

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

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