Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There is an array

int[] array = new int[]{6,4,10,7,7,9};

and a number 8.

I wanna sort the array around 8 by nearest number.

the nearest numbers : 9,7,7,10,6,4 respectively

because 9-1 = 8, 7+1 = 8, 7+1 = 8, 10-2 = 8, 6+2 = 8, 4+4 = 8

how can I sort this numbers. any idea?

share|improve this question
2  
Is this homework? –  Evan Mulawski Apr 12 '12 at 20:55
    
Possible. Since I remember a similar question –  L.B Apr 12 '12 at 21:00
1  
possible duplicate of C# Finding Nearest Number in Array –  L.B Apr 12 '12 at 21:09
    
It is also same question from user1328639 with very nice answers –  L.B Apr 12 '12 at 21:14
    
@L.B: Although i've already voted to close, that's not a duplicate. He wanted the closest value there and here order by distance from a given value. –  Tim Schmelter Apr 12 '12 at 21:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
var result = array.OrderBy(i => Math.Abs(i - value))
             .ThenBy(i => i < value)
             .ToArray();
share|improve this answer
2  
Doesn't the OP want numbers greater than the target value to be placed before numbers less than the target number if the difference is the same? –  devdigital Apr 12 '12 at 20:59
    
yeah, i.e. this produces 7,7,9,6,10,4 but the OP wants 9,7,7,10,6,4 –  Robbie Apr 12 '12 at 21:00
    
@devdigital: Corrected before you've commented. Anyway, why the downvote when OP hasn't mentioned that it matters? It might be simply a bad example. –  Tim Schmelter Apr 12 '12 at 21:01
    
@TimSchmelter ahh, forgot to refresh +1 –  Robbie Apr 12 '12 at 21:02
2  
@devdigital The fact that one example, written out by hand, happened to follow that behavior does not make it a part of the definition. I wouldn't object to adding the additional sort when behavior is undefined, but demanding doesn't seem appropriate. –  Servy Apr 12 '12 at 21:09
int nearbyNumber = 8;
var query = array.OrderBy(number => Math.Abs(number - nearbyNumber ));

You can call ToArray if you really need an array.

If you really want to sort the array in place you can make a custom Comparer object and use Array.Sort, but that's more work...

share|improve this answer
1  
Not so much more work: Array.Sort(array, (a, b) => { int c = Math.Abs(n - a).CompareTo(Math.Abs(n - b)); return c != 0 ? c : b.CompareTo(a); }); –  digEmAll Apr 12 '12 at 21:04
    
@digEmAll Array.Sort doesn't take a Func<T,T,int> it takes an IComparer. That lambda doesn't implement that interface. –  Servy Apr 12 '12 at 21:06
    
Actually there's an overload of Sort taking a delegate -->LINK. Also, I tested that line of code ;) –  digEmAll Apr 12 '12 at 21:07
    
Hmm, hadn't seen that used before. Thanks for the link. –  Servy Apr 12 '12 at 21:12
var array = new int[] { 6, 4, 10, 7, 7, 9 };
int target = 8;
var values = array.OrderBy(i => Math.Abs(i - target)).ToArray();

EDIT I had this answer super fast, then SO stopped me with some captcha's asking if was human. Thanks a lot SO! :)

share|improve this answer
    
yeah, that captcha is a pain, but this produces 7,7,9,6,10,4 and the OP wants 9,7,7,10,6,4 –  Robbie Apr 12 '12 at 21:05
    
his example output is in that order, but he doesn't say he has to be in that order. –  payo Apr 12 '12 at 21:45
    
given that this is the second time he posted this question and the only difference between the two questions is that he added the numbers in that specific order, then he must want them in that order. But i'm not nit-picking, i was just saying... –  Robbie Apr 12 '12 at 21:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.