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I'm writing an assert function. How do I cache #assert if it doesn't exist yet?

function assert( outcome, description ) {
   if (!$('#assert').length) {
      $('body').append('<ul id="assert"></ul>');
   }
   $('#assert').append('<li class="' + (outcome ? 'hide' : 'alert-danger') + '">' + description + '</li>');
}
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I'm afraid that jsLint is going to complain that I'm referencing $('#assert') twice. –  Phillip Apr 12 '12 at 21:00
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd do it like this...

function assert( outcome, description ) {
    var assrt = $('#assert');
    if (!assrt || !assrt.length) {
        assrt = $('<ul>',{id:"assert"}).appendTo('body');
    }
    assrt.append('<li>', {className:outcome ? 'hide' : 'alert-danger', text:description});
}

Or if the assert element is meant to be used by subsequent invocations, I'd probably use a closure to maintain a reference between calls...

var assert = (function() {
    var assrt = $('#assert');

    return function( outcome, description )
        if (!assrt || !assrt.length) {
            assrt = $('<ul>',{id:"assert"}).appendTo('body');
        }
        assrt.append('<li>', {className:outcome ? 'hide' : 'alert-danger', text:description});
    };
}());

You could expand on this by returning several functions...

var assert = (function() {
    var assrt = $('#assert');

    function verify_assert_container() {
        if (!assrt || !assrt.length) {
            assrt = $('<ul>',{id:"assert"}).appendTo('body');
        }
    }

    return {
        add: function( outcome, description )
            verify_assert_container();
            assrt.append('<li>', {className:outcome ? 'hide' : 'alert-danger', text:description});
        },
        empty: function() {
            verify_assert_container();
            assrt.empty();
        },
        sort: function() {
            verify_assert_container();
            // use sorting algorithm to reorder the LI elements
        },
        destroy: function() {
            if (assrt) {
                assrt.remove();
                assrt = null;
            }
        }
    };
}());

and use it like this...

assert.add('foo', 'bar');
assert.empty();
assert.destroy();
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Wow. This is a very good piece of code. This gives me a good example of when to use a closure. –  Phillip Apr 13 '12 at 22:52
    
@Pedro: If you like that closure idea, I added another example that returns several functions in an object, all of which operate on the closed variable, as well as a reusable function. –  squint Apr 13 '12 at 23:05
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$assert = $('<ul id="assert"></ul>');
$('body').append($assert);

Note that I did not declare $assert with the var keyword, thus giving it global scope (in case you wanted it elsewhere). If you only need it scoped to your assert function, use var.

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You mean something like this?

 div = $("<div>").attr("id", "assert")
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