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I need a MySQL table to hold ALL DATES between 2011-01-01 and 2011-12-31. I have created a table with one column names "_date", type DATE.

With what query can I populate the table with all the desired dates (instead of having to enter them by hand)?

share|improve this question
2  
and you are using only mysql? nothing like php etc.? – hjpotter92 Apr 12 '12 at 21:25
1  
thank you! :-) (and upvoted) – Pr0no Apr 12 '12 at 21:29
2  
And to answer your question, I have access to PHP, but (i) wouldn't really know how to quickly calculate all the dates within the range in PHP and (ii) i guess MySQL could do that far more efficient? – Pr0no Apr 12 '12 at 21:37
    
@hjpotter92: If you know both equally as well, it's really not easier in PHP. And it's a lot more efficient to do it in MySQL. – mwotton Oct 22 '15 at 6:32
up vote 26 down vote accepted

Try this:

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS filldates;
DELIMITER |
CREATE PROCEDURE filldates(dateStart DATE, dateEnd DATE)
BEGIN
  WHILE dateStart <= dateEnd DO
    INSERT INTO tablename (_date) VALUES (dateStart);
    SET dateStart = date_add(dateStart, INTERVAL 1 DAY);
  END WHILE;
END;
|
DELIMITER ;
CALL filldates('2011-01-01','2011-12-31');

Here's the SQL Fiddle to play with it: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/65d13/1

EDIT (to check if date already exists) as asked by Andrew Fox.

CREATE PROCEDURE filldates(dateStart DATE, dateEnd DATE)

BEGIN

DECLARE adate date;

    WHILE dateStart <= dateEnd DO

        SET adate = (SELECT mydate FROM MyDates WHERE mydate = dateStart);

        IF adate IS NULL THEN BEGIN

            INSERT INTO MyDates (mydate) VALUES (dateStart);

        END; END IF;

        SET dateStart = date_add(dateStart, INTERVAL 1 DAY);

    END WHILE;

END;//

Here's the SQL Fiddle to play with it: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/66f86/1

share|improve this answer
    
Didn't work on my server atleast. alter routine command denied to user 'name'@'localhost' for routine 'name.filldates': DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS filldates – hjpotter92 Apr 12 '12 at 21:32
    
A different error this time: You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'DELIMITER | CREATE PROCEDURE filldates(dateStart DATE, dateEnd DATE) BEGIN WHI' at line 1: DELIMITER | CREATE PROCEDURE filldates(dateStart DATE, dateEnd DATE) BEGIN WHILE dateStart <= dateEnd – hjpotter92 Apr 12 '12 at 21:36
    
Are you running your own mysql server? If so, try logging in as the root user or even grant the necessary permissions to your current user account. Sample: GRANT ALL ON mydb.* TO 'someuser'@'somehost'; More on this here: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/… – Leniel Macaferi Apr 12 '12 at 21:37
1  
Yes sir. But this time I tried using remote access. – hjpotter92 Apr 12 '12 at 21:38
1  
To those who are getting syntax errors. If you connect to your database via MySQL Workbench and try to run the create procedure script you will get syntax errors. To get this script to run right click the "Stored Procedures" menu and select "Create Stored Procedure" then paste the create procedure script, remove the "//" in the end of the script and hit "Apply". It worked for me. – Murilo Garcia Aug 5 '15 at 18:41

I found this paste-and-go variant working:

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS FillCalendar;
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS calendar;
CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS calendar(calendar_date DATE NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY);

DELIMITER $$
    CREATE PROCEDURE FillCalendar(start_date DATE, end_date DATE)
    BEGIN
    DECLARE crt_date DATE;
    SET crt_date = start_date;
    WHILE crt_date <= end_date DO
        INSERT IGNORE INTO calendar VALUES(crt_date);
        SET crt_date = ADDDATE(crt_date, INTERVAL 1 DAY);
    END WHILE;
    END$$
DELIMITER ;

CALL FillCalendar('2013-01-01', '2013-01-03');
CALL FillCalendar('2013-01-01', '2013-01-07');
share|improve this answer
    
if anyone wants some pi: CALL FillCalendar('2013-01-01', '2099-01-04'); select count(*) from calendar; 31415 – robert king Mar 2 at 22:50

I did not want my SQL query to require external dependencies (needing to have a calendar table, procedure for populating a temporary table with dates, etc.) The original idea for this query came from http://jeffgarretson.wordpress.com/2012/05/04/generating-a-range-of-dates-in-mysql/ which I had slightly optimized for clarity and ease of use.

SELECT (CURDATE() - INTERVAL c.number DAY) AS date
FROM (SELECT singles + tens + hundreds number FROM 
( SELECT 0 singles
UNION ALL SELECT   1 UNION ALL SELECT   2 UNION ALL SELECT   3
UNION ALL SELECT   4 UNION ALL SELECT   5 UNION ALL SELECT   6
UNION ALL SELECT   7 UNION ALL SELECT   8 UNION ALL SELECT   9
) singles JOIN 
(SELECT 0 tens
UNION ALL SELECT  10 UNION ALL SELECT  20 UNION ALL SELECT  30
UNION ALL SELECT  40 UNION ALL SELECT  50 UNION ALL SELECT  60
UNION ALL SELECT  70 UNION ALL SELECT  80 UNION ALL SELECT  90
) tens  JOIN 
(SELECT 0 hundreds
UNION ALL SELECT  100 UNION ALL SELECT  200 UNION ALL SELECT  300
UNION ALL SELECT  400 UNION ALL SELECT  500 UNION ALL SELECT  600
UNION ALL SELECT  700 UNION ALL SELECT  800 UNION ALL SELECT  900
) hundreds
ORDER BY number DESC) c  
WHERE c.number BETWEEN 0 and 364

It is simple to optimize and scale this table for other uses. You can easily get rid of the tens and hundreds tables if you only need one week of data.

If you need a larger set of numbers, it is easy to add a thousands table. You only need to copy and paste the table with hundreds and add a zero to 9 numbers.

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This is a very interesting concept, a bit slow when processing many dates, but, quite good indeed. Perhaps faster than the alternatives though. – Felype Nov 24 '15 at 15:46

If you have a table with a large enough contiguous set of ids you could use -

INSERT INTO tablename (_date)
SELECT '2011-01-01' + INTERVAL (id - 1) DAY
FROM some_table_with_lots_of_ids
WHERE id BETWEEN 1 AND 365

note: but be aware that this might get you in trouble during leap-years (having 366 days)

share|improve this answer

Thanks to IvanD. I've got a better solution which allowes you to create a specified calendar table. For example, if I'm trying to create a table of 2014-04, it looks like this:

SELECT (CURDATE() - INTERVAL c.number DAY) AS DATE
FROM 
(
    SELECT singles + tens + hundreds number FROM 
    ( 
        SELECT 0 singles
        UNION ALL SELECT   1 UNION ALL SELECT   2 UNION ALL SELECT   3
        UNION ALL SELECT   4 UNION ALL SELECT   5 UNION ALL SELECT   6
        UNION ALL SELECT   7 UNION ALL SELECT   8 UNION ALL SELECT   9
    ) singles JOIN 
    (
        SELECT 0 tens
        UNION ALL SELECT  10 UNION ALL SELECT  20 UNION ALL SELECT  30
        UNION ALL SELECT  40 UNION ALL SELECT  50 UNION ALL SELECT  60
        UNION ALL SELECT  70 UNION ALL SELECT  80 UNION ALL SELECT  90
    ) tens  JOIN 
    (
        SELECT 0 hundreds
        UNION ALL SELECT  100 UNION ALL SELECT  200 UNION ALL SELECT  300
        UNION ALL SELECT  400 UNION ALL SELECT  500 UNION ALL SELECT  600
        UNION ALL SELECT  700 UNION ALL SELECT  800 UNION ALL SELECT  900
    ) hundreds
    ORDER BY number DESC
) c  
WHERE c.number BETWEEN 
DAYOFYEAR(NOW()) - DAYOFYEAR('2014-04-01')-  DAY(LAST_DAY('2014-04-01')) +1
AND 
DAYOFYEAR(NOW()) - DAYOFYEAR('2014-04-01')
share|improve this answer
    
This won't return table of 2014-04, but table with already passed days in selected month and in current year! – TooroSan Apr 12 at 12:15

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