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I'm learning CoffeeScript, and I've got one minor headache I haven't quite been able to figure out. If I create an object to do certain things, I occasionally need an instance variable for that object to be shared between methods. For instance, I'd like to do this:

testObject = 

  var message # <- Doesn't work in CoffeeScript.

  methodOne: ->
    message = "Foo!"

  methodTwo: ->
    alert message

However, you can't use var in CoffeeScript, and without that declaration message is only visible inside methodOne. So, how do you create an instance variable in an object in CoffeeScript?


Update: Fixed typo in my example so the methods are actually methods :)

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BTW I'm aware that I could do message = "", but I really just want the variable to be null so I can set behavior based on existence rather than a more complex check to see if it's not "blank" etc. –  Andrew Apr 12 '12 at 21:25
    
You can also set message = null which is what you want no? –  Sandro Apr 12 '12 at 21:34
    
When I try message = null I get ParseError Unexpected 'TERMINATOR' –  Andrew Apr 12 '12 at 21:41
    
Oh yea, like the correct answer mentioned, you were assigning testObject to an object = and not a function = ()-> –  Sandro Apr 12 '12 at 22:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can't like that. To quote the language reference:

Because you don't have direct access to the var keyword, it's impossible to shadow an outer variable on purpose, you may only refer to it. So be careful that you're not reusing the name of an external variable accidentally, if you're writing a deeply nested function.

However what you're trying to do wouldn't be possible in JS either, it would be equivalent to

testObject = {
    var message;
    methodOne: message = "Foo!",
    methodTwo: alert(message)
}

which isn't valid JS, as you can't declare a variable in an object like that; you need to use functions to define methods. For example in CoffeeScript:

testObject =
    message: ''
    methodOne: ->
        this.message = "Foo!"
    methodTwo: ->
        alert message

You can also use @ as a shortcut for 'this.', i.e. @message instead of this.message.

Alternatively consider using CoffeeScript's class syntax:

class testObject
    constructor: ->
        @message = ''

    methodOne: ->
        @message = "Foo!"

    methodTwo: ->
        alert @message
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Great example, thanks! –  Andrew Apr 12 '12 at 21:44

Just to add to @Lauren's answer, what you wanted is basically the module pattern:

testObject = do ->

  message = null

  methodOne = ->
    message = "Foo!"

  methodTwo = ->
    alert message

  return {
    methodOne
    methodTwo
  }

Where message is a "private" variable only available to those methods.

Depending on the context you could also declare message before the object so that it's available to both methods (if executed in this context):

message = null

testObject = 
  methodOne: -> message = "Foo!"
  methodTwo: -> alert message
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Thanks for the extra info, this is helpful! –  Andrew Apr 13 '12 at 2:20
    
Correct, but your code is a bit buggy: do will simply create a closure, you therefore cannot define properties but should use vars instead (methodOne = ->... etc.) Also, the return statement should probably be {methodOne:methodOne, methodTwo:methodTwo}. Of course you could put your method definitions right into the return statement instead... –  Julian D. Apr 16 '12 at 22:28
    
@JulianD. copy&pasta :) The return statement is using destructuring assignment. –  Ricardo Tomasi Jun 21 '12 at 7:39
    
@RicardoTomasi very cool –  Wex Apr 30 '13 at 4:53

You can define the property with:

message: null

But, you aren't currently defining methods -- you need -> for that.

Then, to refer to instance properties within the methods, prefix the property names with @.

testObject = 

  message: null

  methodOne: ->
    @message = "Foo!"

  methodTwo: ->
    alert @message
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-> is not required: see my fixed version –  Kristoffer S Hansen Apr 12 '12 at 21:31
    
@KristofferSHansen your version isn't fixed; as you can see by pressing 'Run' on that page, it would show an alert dialog immediately, and that is probably not what Andrew is after, more likely he wants to defer its execution until that method is called. –  Lauren Apr 12 '12 at 21:34
    
@KristofferSHansen It is for function/methods. Without it, methodTwo is set to the result of calling alert, not a function that in turn calls alert. –  Jonathan Lonowski Apr 12 '12 at 21:35
    
My bad, fixed in answer –  Kristoffer S Hansen Apr 12 '12 at 21:37
    
Thanks for catching the typo, I fixed it. My real code had the ->. –  Andrew Apr 12 '12 at 21:40

Use @ to point to this

testObject = 

  methodOne: ->
    @message = "Foo!"

  methodTwo: ->
    alert @message

fixed version on coffeescript.org

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