Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table with an index of the other tables in my database.

Previously I iterated through this index to perform queries on the tables indexed, but as you might imagine, this is very slow for a large number of tables.

I wonder if it's possible to form a table expression from the results of a query on my index table and therefore write my query as one statement with the FROM using the list of tables result of the query on my index table.

ETA: I am using PostgreSQL v9.0. I am querying multiple tables with the same query by iterating through them one at a time (which is slow). I would like to speed this up, if there is a way to query all the tables with one table expression which is a list of all the tables selected from the index table.

My (simplified) tables are "tabledata" which contains a list of identical schema tables A, B, C, D, E, F, G and a boolean 'enabled' for each. I wish to query all the lettered tables for which 'enabled' is true; preferably with one query rather than iterating through them one at a time. Basically to query those tables returned by:

SELECT tablename FROM tabledata WHERE enabled = TRUE`

ETA2: I have entered below in the query tool:

CREATE FUNCTION f_all_tables()
  RETURNS SETOF A AS 
$body$
DECLARE 
    _tbl oid;
BEGIN 
FOR _tbl IN 
    SELECT tablename::regclass
    FROM   tabledata 
    WHERE  enabled 
LOOP 
    RETURN QUERY EXECUTE  '
    SELECT * FROM ' || _tbl; 
END LOOP; 
END;

$body$ language plpgsql; 

SELECT * FROM f_all_tables();

And get an error:

ERROR:  invalid input syntax for type oid: "A"
CONTEXT:  PL/pgSQL function "f_all_tables" line 6 at FOR over SELECT rows

where A is the first table name in tabledata.

ETA3:

I have implemented the 2nd solution below and it works. Thanks Example code:

CREATE TABLE tabledata2 
(
  tablename character(64) NOT NULL,
  enabled boolean
)
WITH (
  OIDS=FALSE
);
ALTER TABLE tabledata2
  OWNER TO postgres;

CREATE TABLE AAAAAA
(
  enabled boolean
)
WITH (
  OIDS=FALSE
);
ALTER TABLE AAAAAA
  OWNER TO postgres;
CREATE TABLE AAAAAB
(
  enabled boolean
)
WITH (
  OIDS=FALSE
);
ALTER TABLE AAAAAB
  OWNER TO postgres;

INSERT INTO tabledata2 VALUES ('AAAAAA', 'true');
INSERT INTO tabledata2 VALUES ('AAAAAB', 'true');
INSERT INTO AAAAAA VALUES ('true');
INSERT INTO AAAAAB VALUES ('false');

CREATE FUNCTION f_all_tables() 
  RETURNS SETOF AAAAAA AS  
$body$ 
DECLARE  
    _tbl regclass; 
BEGIN  
FOR _tbl IN  
    SELECT tablename::regclass 
    FROM   tabledata2  
    WHERE  enabled
LOOP  
    RETURN QUERY EXECUTE  ' 
    SELECT * FROM ' || _tbl;  
END LOOP;  
END; 

$body$ language plpgsql;  

SELECT * FROM f_all_tables(); 
share|improve this question
2  
Welcome to StackOverflow. This is far too vague and general a question to be answerable. You've given absolutely no useful information about what your database schema is like, what you're currently doing (other than a meaningless description), and no indication of what you're actually trying to accomplish. If I answer "yes, it's possible", will you award me the correct answer? What about if I say "no, it's not"? How about "maybe"? Please edit your question to provide sufficient details so that someone can try and help; as it is, it should be closed as "not a real question". Thanks. :) –  Ken White Apr 12 '12 at 22:23
    
Please, be more specific: table structures, volumes, SQL queries. –  vyegorov Apr 12 '12 at 22:26
    
"I have a table with an index of the other tables in my database" It's very very very likely that you are doing something wrong here. What is the problem you are trying to solve? Maybe we can come up with a way of redesigning the way you're storing information so that this kind of construct is not needed (it should never be needed) –  IfLoop Apr 14 '12 at 23:55
    
You shouldn't use the data type character(64) for table names. That's a blank-padded type, largely useless nowadays and may lead to errors. Use text instead. More about character types in the fine manual. –  Erwin Brandstetter Apr 22 '12 at 3:49
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I gather from your comment that all your candidate tables share the same layout.

You already know yourself, that the proper way would be to have one table that holds all rows, possibly with an additional column to mark their type.

Retrieve rows from one table

CREATE FUNCTION f_table(int)
  RETURNS SETOF A AS
$body$
BEGIN

    RETURN QUERY EXECUTE '
    SELECT * FROM ' || tablename::regclass FROM mytables WHERE id = $1;

END;
$body$ language plpgsql;

Call:

SELECT * FROM f_table(42);

Major points:

  • You can query a "table-function" (function returning SETOF values) just like a table.

  • Your tables share the same layout. So you can define the return type and do not have to type a column definition list with every call.

  • You must know that there is a composite type of the same name for every table in PostgreSQL. That's why you can use the name of one of the tables (A in my example) as return type and it will work.

  • I use the cast to regclass for the tablename instead of quote_ident(tablename). It protects against SQL injection just as well and it also works for schema-qualified table names like myschma.mytable. quote_ident() would be a good idea but fail in such a case.

  • A function with dynamic SQL can never be defined STABLE. More about creating functions in the manual.


Retrieve rows from all tables

(All of the same basic type.)
First off: there is no way in pure SQL to do this with a dynamic list of tables.

CREATE FUNCTION f_all_tables()
  RETURNS SETOF A AS
$body$
DECLARE
    _tbl regclass;
BEGIN

FOR _tbl IN
    SELECT tablename::regclass
    FROM   tabledata
    WHERE  enabled
LOOP
    RETURN QUERY EXECUTE '
    SELECT * FROM ' || _tbl;
END LOOP;

END;
$body$ language plpgsql;

Call:

SELECT * FROM f_all_tables();

If the members of this set of tables would not change, you could write one big ugly UNION SELECT:

SELECT * FROM A
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM B
...

UNION ALL to keep all duplicates in the result.

share|improve this answer
    
I executed: CREATE FUNCTION f_table() RETURNS SETOF one_of_the_tables AS $body$ BEGIN RETURN QUERY EXECUTE ' SELECT * FROM ' || tablename::regclass FROM tabledata; END; $body$ language plpgsql; Select * from f_table(); and got the error:{truncated} ********** Error ********** ERROR: query "SELECT ' SELECT * FROM ' || tablename::regclass FROM tabledata" returned more than one row SQL state: 21000 Context: PL/pgSQL function "f_table" line 4 at RETURN QUERY I want to query on multiple tables. –  John Smith Apr 13 '12 at 19:57
    
Sorry for the terrible formatting; haven't figured that out yet. –  John Smith Apr 13 '12 at 20:00
    
@JohnSmith: I have tested the code I posted and it works for PostgreSQL 9.1. You neglected to disclose your version of PostgreSQL, so I assumed current version. Do you want to query multiple tables at once? Or one at a time? Please edit your question (press edit under your question) with your exact requirements. You can format text there. Do not put that in comments which are hard to read. You can add a short comment here so I get notified of your changes. Also add your version of PostgreSQL and the exact names and types of relevant tables and columns, please. –  Erwin Brandstetter Apr 13 '12 at 20:30
    
Erwin, Thanks so much for your patience and response. I have updated my question. Please let me know where it is still unclear. –  John Smith Apr 13 '12 at 22:03
    
@JohnSmith: I added another answer to my answer. –  Erwin Brandstetter Apr 13 '12 at 22:31
show 16 more comments

Something like:

SELECT * FROM (SELECT tablename FROM mytables WHERE id = 42);

? That's not really possible.

The most obvious way is to resort to a dynamic statement with EXECUTE. You could write a function that takes the name of the table and returns all the columns for all the rows, which you then need to specify the column definition list for:

CREATE FUNCTION select_from_table(TEXT) RETURNS SETOF RECORD
STABLE LANGUAGE 'plpgsql' AS
$$
BEGIN
    RETURN QUERY EXECUTE 'SELECT * FROM ' || quote_ident($1);
END;
$$;

SELECT * FROM select_from_table('pg_namespace') AS s(nspname name, nspowner oid, nspacl aclitem[]);

You have to think about how ugly this is. If all your tables will have the same schema then you could clean it a bit by returning a proper type (instead of getting the caller to specify the big ugly column definition list each time).

Better still if you always want to filter in a certain way, you could make it do that.

But generally, you should also think about what you're trying to accomplish and whether you can do it in a more SQL way.

share|improve this answer
    
Something like: SELECT * FROM (SELECT tablename FROM mytables WHERE id = 42); ? That's not really possible This is what I've already tried and determined does not work; it is essentially what I want to do. Unfortunately I am not versed enough to understand how your suggestion works and will have to research it to figure out whether it does what I want. All of the tables I want to query have the same schema. I know the more SQL way would be to have one large table, but when I designed the scheme I was planning on (eventually) having a distributed database with different computers working. –  John Smith Apr 13 '12 at 5:29
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.