Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a Lua table that represents a matrix, however I keep running into a problem where if I create two Matrices, and initialize some values they both have the same values.

--Test.Lua
require"Matrix"

M1 = Matrix.Matrix:New()
M2 = Matrix.Matrix:New()

M1._11 = 2

print(M1._11) --Prints 2
print(M2._11) --Prints 2


--Matrix.lua

module("Matrix", package.seeall)

Matrix = {}

Matrix = {  _11 = 0, _12 = 0, _13 = 0,
        _21 = 0, _22 = 0, _23 = 0,
        _31 = 0, _32 = 0, _33 = 0
    }

function Matrix:New()
    object = object or {}
    setmetatable(object, self)
    self.__index = self
    return object
end 
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

object = object or {}

This is why that happens. You only ever create one Matrix object. There is only every one object table which you return, and there is only ever one self table that you use as a metatable.

So how can you expect different instances when Matrix:New will always return the exact same value on every call?

You need to return a new table for each New call; that's why we use that name ;) Because of the way you're using a metatable, you also have to return a new metatable; you can't return the same metatable attached to new tables and expect it to work.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh ok, I took that New method from Programming In Lua, maybe I didn't implement it correctly. How would I fix this? –  RedShft Apr 12 '12 at 22:52
1  
@RedShft: I would suggest looking back at "Programming in Lua" and understanding what it's doing and why it does it instead of just copying and pasting the code. None of the metatables it uses are used the way yours are (with PIL, it's the object that stores the data; the metatables just store certain functions and such). Also, PIL's new functions optionally took an object as a parameter; that's why they did the o = o or {} thing. Your function is just using a global variable named object because you forgot to take object as a parameter. Note that this won't fix your problem. –  Nicol Bolas Apr 12 '12 at 22:58
    
You refuse to explain it to me? Ok. –  RedShft Apr 12 '12 at 23:03
2  
@RedShft: He just did. –  Puppy Apr 13 '12 at 11:05

As nicol is explaining, on one hand you are trying to "reuse the same object over and over" (probably to "make it faster") and on the other you want to have different objects.

The solution is - don't reuse object on New call.

local Matrix = {} -- don't use the module function. Make Matrix local ...
Matrix.__index = Matrix

function Matrix:New()
    local object = { -- create one local variable on every call to New
        _11 = 0, _12 = 0, _13 = 0,
        _21 = 0, _22 = 0, _23 = 0,
        _31 = 0, _32 = 0, _33 = 0
    }   
    setmetatable(object, self)
    return object
end

return Matrix -- ... and return the Matrix local var at the end

A couple notes:

  • You really must learn how to use local
  • Usage of the module function is not recommended. Return a local table instead, as in my example.

Usage: assuming that that file is called "Matrix.lua":

local Matrix = require 'Matrix'

local M1 = Matrix:New()
local M2 = Matrix:New()
-- etc

As a sidenote, the Matrix:New() function can be made shorter (and faster). The following implementation works exactly as the one above, but it's slightly more efficient:

function Matrix:New()
    return setmetatable({
        _11 = 0, _12 = 0, _13 = 0,
        _21 = 0, _22 = 0, _23 = 0,
        _31 = 0, _32 = 0, _33 = 0
    },
    self)
end

This works because setmetatable(t,m) returns t with m already set as its metatable.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.