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I'm trying to be good, I really am, but I can't see how to do it :)

Any advice on how to not use a global here would be greatly appreciated. Let's call the global G.

Function A 
  Builds G by AJAX

Function B
  Uses G

Function C
  Calls B
  Called by numerous event handlers attached to DOM elements (type 1)

Function D
  Calls B
  Called by numerous event handlers attached to DOM elements (type 2)

I can't see how I can get around using a global here. The DOM elements (types 1 & 2) are created in other functions (E&F) which are unconnected with A. I don't want to add G to each event handler (because it's large and there's lots of these event handlers), and doing so would require the same kind of solution as I'm seeking here (i.e., getting G to E&F).

The global G, BTW, is an array that is necessary to build other elements as they, in turn, are built by AJAX.

I'm not convinced that a singleton is real solution, either.

Thanks.

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Stick everything in a closure? :p –  Elliot Bonneville Apr 12 '12 at 23:10
    
(function(){})() // <--- used to take advantage of closures in many cases but not a closure in its own right. –  Erik Reppen Apr 12 '12 at 23:20
    
Thanks for the help, all. –  Nick Apr 13 '12 at 5:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Stick everything in one big immediately-executing function, of course!

(function() {
    // Your code goes here
})(); // Called right away

You can put anything in there and it will be accessible to anything in a narrower scope, but they still won't be global.

Also, if yours is the only file, stop avoiding globals because there's really no harm unless you're making some kind of reusable component.

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1  
+1 for stop avoiding globals. –  Dennis Apr 12 '12 at 23:13
    
That is a very elegant way of limiting the scope of variables. –  Travis J Apr 12 '12 at 23:15
    
It is handy, but as an exercise in portability, I think it's important to learn how to avoid relying on general vars unless they're enclosed in some kind of a namespace you can move around at will. But yes, that's the best quick fix if you already have a bunch of globals and a good way to avoid namespace collision when you're writing bundles of functionality on a site that's going to be hit by another group of devs. –  Erik Reppen Apr 12 '12 at 23:30

You're not giving us a lot of information to know what the best alternatives are, but here are some general types of options:

Ajax Results Passed as Function Argument

Function A() { 
  Builds G by AJAX
  B(G)
}

Function B(g) {
  Uses g
}

Since, the timing of G is such that it can't be used until the success handler in A is called anyway, then perhaps you just pass it to B as a parameter and don't need it as a global.

DOM Elements Retrieved Upon Demand

For the DOM elements, there is typically no requirement to store DOM element references in javascript variables. If you give them appropriate IDs, then you can fetch them upon demand whenever needed with document.getElementById("idName").

If you really need persistent variables available across numerous events and functions, then you have two options:

Self Executing Function Closure to Share Persistent Data without Globals

You can store them inside a self executing function closure:

(function() {

var G = [];

Function A 
  Builds G by AJAX

Function B
  Uses G

})();

Single Global Object

Create a single true global that you then store your other data off as properites:

var myMainGlobal = {};

myMainGlobal.G = [];
myMainGlobal.A = function() {
  Builds myMainGlobal.G by AJAX
}

myMainGlobal.B = function() {
  Uses myMainGlobal.G
}

This, at least only creates one actual top level global symbol, while letting you have as much global data as you need.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, my old friend :) (Excuse the pun - more amusing to me than you, I'm sure!) I could have ticked your answer, but I thought I'd share the love. Regarding your comment, '...there is typically no requirement to store DOM element references', I have a two questions. (1) What indicated that I'm storing DOM IDs in vars? (2) More importantly, with big functions, my event handlers call .on('click',function(event){myfn(v1,v2);}); I like to name big functions if poss. This denies access to 'this', though. Is this unwise? Can fns know what called them with this method without passing the id in a var? –  Nick Apr 13 '12 at 7:19
1  
You made multiple references to DOM elements so I thought you had an issue with them. You can control what`this` is set to in a function by simply using myfn.call(this, v1, v2) instead of myfn(v1,v2). See MDN documentation for .call(). –  jfriend00 Apr 13 '12 at 13:55
    
Thanks. Once again, this is helpful. –  Nick Apr 13 '12 at 21:45

Don't worry about passing G in the event. It's just a reference to the actual object, not a copy, so it wouldn't cause memory issues. Functions, objects, and arrays are passed as references.

share|improve this answer
    
This is helpful to know. Thanks. –  Nick Apr 13 '12 at 5:02
    
Generally speaking, if it's a potentially large/complex structure of some kind, it's going to be passed as a reference rather than a copy in most languages. In JS, I'm certain of it. –  Erik Reppen Apr 13 '12 at 5:08

What happens if one of the event handlers (that relies on G) is fired before you've received the AJAX response? To solve this problem, and to bind G to B by closure, you could try rigging up the event handlers in the AJAX callback:

function A() {
    ajaxLoad(function(G) {
        attachEvents1(C);
        attachEvents2(D);

        function B() {
            G.use();
        }

        function C() {
            B();
        }

        function D() {
            B();
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's a good theoretical point, although in practice function A fires at $(document).ready so it shouldn't happen :) –  Nick Apr 13 '12 at 5:01
    
It's not theoretical.. I realize A fires on ready, but A makes the AJAX request, right? The response won't be immediately available. –  Emmett Apr 13 '12 at 5:25
    
The user makes the AJAX request when they click on one of the DOM elements that call C or D (which in turn call B). So in practice, it should be just theoretical :) –  Nick Apr 13 '12 at 9:47

I dunno if this is an option?

Function Everything() {
  var G

  Function A 
    Builds G by AJAX

  Function B
    Uses G

  Function C
    Calls B
    Called by numerous event handlers attached to DOM elements (type 1)

  Function D
    Calls B
    Called by numerous event handlers attached to DOM elements (type 2)
}();
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