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I'm working on a bit of code that is supposed to run an exe file inside a folder on my system and getting an error saying...

WindowsError: [Error 3] The system cannot find the path specified. Here's a bit of the code:

exepath = os.path.join(EXE file localtion)
exepath = '"' + os.path.normpath(exepath) + '"'
cmd = [exepath, '-el', str(el), '-n', str(z)]

print 'The python program is running this command:'
print cmd

process = Popen(cmd, stderr=STDOUT, stdout=PIPE)
outputstring = process.communicate()[0]

I have imported subprocess and also from subprocess import *

For example, This is how my exe file location looks like in the first line of the code I show:

 exepath= os.path.join('/Program Files','next folder','next folder','blah.exe')

Am I missing something?

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1  
If you execute open(exepath), does it raise IOError (indicating that this file is inaccessible)? – Mike Hordecki Jun 18 '09 at 15:33
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to properly escape the space in the executable path

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escape the space? – Tyler Jun 18 '09 at 15:26
    
Yes, escape the space. Also, what's the "/" doing there? Doesn't windows use "\"? Generally, don't use "Program Files" or "My Documents" for anything, and you'll be much happier. – S.Lott Jun 18 '09 at 15:37
    
/ works just fine in system calls on Windows and did so even in real DOS. – Sinan Ünür Jun 18 '09 at 15:44

Besides properly escaping spaces and other characters that could cause problems (such as /), you can also use the 8 character old DOS paths.

For example, Program Files would be:

Progra~1 , making sure to append ~1 for the last two characters.

EDIT: You could add an r to the front of the string, making it a raw literal. Python would read the string character for character. Like this:

r " \Program files"

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There should be two backslashes in front of Program Files, Stack overflow's editor is cutting one of them off. – AlbertoPL Jun 18 '09 at 15:37

If I remember correctly, you don't need to quote your executuable file path, like you do in the second line.

EDIT: Well, just grabbed nearby Windows box and tested this. Popen works the same regardless the path is quoted or not. So this is not an issue.

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Just taking the quotes off the code above, It says 'blah' is not defined in my example – Tyler Jun 18 '09 at 15:28

AFAIK, there is no need to surround the path in quotation marks unless cmd.exe is involved in running the program.

In addition, you might want to use the environment variable ProgramFiles to find out the actual location of 'Program Files' because that depends on regional settings and can also be tweaked using TweakUI.

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blah.exe is used in running the program. I'm feeding it a for statement with some numbers the blah.exe file uses. – Tyler Jun 18 '09 at 15:32

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