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I'm playing with these Windows 8 WinRT tasks, and I'm trying to cancel a task using the method below, and it works to some point. The CancelNotification method DOES get called, which makes you think the task was cancelled, but in the background the task keeps running, then after it's completed, the status of the Task is always completed and never cancelled. Is there a way to completely halt the task when it's cancelled?

private async void TryTask()
{
    CancellationTokenSource source = new CancellationTokenSource();
    source.Token.Register(CancelNotification);
    source.CancelAfter(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
    var task = Task<int>.Factory.StartNew(() => slowFunc(1, 2), source.Token);

    await task;            

    if (task.IsCompleted)
    {
        MessageDialog md = new MessageDialog(task.Result.ToString());
        await md.ShowAsync();
    }
    else
    {
        MessageDialog md = new MessageDialog("Uncompleted");
        await md.ShowAsync();
    }
}

private int slowFunc(int a, int b)
{
    string someString = string.Empty;
    for (int i = 0; i < 200000; i++)
    {
        someString += "a";
    }

    return a + b;
}

private void CancelNotification()
{
}
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2 Answers

up vote 47 down vote accepted

Read up on Cancellation (which was introduced in .NET 4.0 and is largely unchanged since then) and the Task-Based Asynchronous Pattern, which provides guidelines on how to use CancellationToken with async methods.

To summarize, you pass a CancellationToken into each method that supports cancellation, and that method must check it periodically.

private async Task TryTask()
{
  CancellationTokenSource source = new CancellationTokenSource();
  source.CancelAfter(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
  Task<int> task = Task.Run(() => slowFunc(1, 2, source.Token), source.Token);

  // (A canceled task will raise an exception when awaited).
  await task;
}

private int slowFunc(int a, int b, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
  string someString = string.Empty;
  for (int i = 0; i < 200000; i++)
  {
    someString += "a";
    if (i % 1000 == 0)
      cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
  }

  return a + b;
}
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Wow great info! That worked perfectly, now I need to figure out how to handle the exception in the async method. Thanks man! I'll read the stuff you suggested. –  Carlo Apr 13 '12 at 2:48
    
Ok handling was easy. Again thanks much!! =) –  Carlo Apr 13 '12 at 2:52
5  
No. Most long-running synchronous methods have some way to cancel them - sometimes by closing an underlying resource or calling another method. CancellationToken has all the hooks necessary to interop with custom cancellation systems, but nothing can cancel an uncancelable method. –  Stephen Cleary Apr 14 '12 at 0:01
1  
Ah I see. So the best way to catch the ProcessCancelledException is by wrapping the 'await' in a try / catch? Sometimes I get the AggregatedException and I can't handle that. –  Carlo Apr 14 '12 at 0:14
1  
Right. I recommend that you never use Wait or Result in async methods; you should always use await instead, which unwraps the exception correctly. –  Stephen Cleary Apr 14 '12 at 0:17
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I just want to add to the already accepted answer. I was stuck on this, but I was going a different route on handling the complete event. Rather than running await, I add a completed handler to the task.

Comments.AsAsyncAction().Completed += new AsyncActionCompletedHandler(CommentLoadComplete);

Where the event handler looks like this

private void CommentLoadComplete(IAsyncAction sender, AsyncStatus status )
        {
            if (status == AsyncStatus.Canceled)
                return;
            CommentsItemsControl.ItemsSource = Comments.Result;
            CommentScrollViewer.ScrollToVerticalOffset(0);
            CommentScrollViewer.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
            CommentProgressRing.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
        }

With this route, all the handling is already done for you, when the task is cancelled it just triggers the event handler and you can see if it was cancelled there.

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