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I have an unusual problem with a form (here's a slimmed down version):

<script>
    (function($){
        $("form").submit(function(){ 
            alert('Checkout time!'); 
        });
        $("button[name='process_order']").click(function(){ 
            alert('Button Checkout time!'); 
        });
        $("button[name='back']").click(function(){ 
            alert('Back Button'); 
        });
    })(jQuery);
</script>

<form>
    <input type="text" name="moo1" tabindex="1" />
    <input type="text" name="moo2" tabindex="2" />
    <button name="back" tabindex="4">Back</button>
    <button name="process_order" tabindex="3">Process Order</button>
</form>

The buttons work fine, however, if I hit enter when one of the textboxes that has focus, the 'Back Button' action is what fires... even though the form's submit handler is set to do "checkout"...

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How about avoiding the conflict introduced by the two buttons and just setting the back action up as a styled link? –  rjz Apr 13 '12 at 2:17
    
A button in a form is, by default, a submit button. Replace it with a type button. –  RobG Apr 13 '12 at 2:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could probably change the process_order tothis:

<input type="submit" name="process_order" value="Process Order" tabindex="3" />

And change to:

<form id="myForm">

Then, bind the .submit() handler to it

$('#myForm').submit(function()
{
    alert('Button checkout time!');
    return false; //we return false so that it doesn't refresh the page
});
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This solved it... I still find it strange that this was happening though... :S –  Ian Apr 13 '12 at 3:09
    
Some of the other answers suggest that the cause is that a <button></button> is by default a submit button, and changing the type is another solution. However the solution I provided is technically how it should be done. it is the most flexible and will keep your code scalable. –  teh1 Apr 13 '12 at 3:15

Your form has two submit buttons, the form will submit with the enter key by activating the first submit button. change

<button name="back" tabindex="4">Back</button>

to

<button type="button" name="back" tabindex="4">Back</button>

to avoid the browser interpreting the first button as a submit button

share|improve this answer
    
The default type for a button element in a form is submit. –  RobG Apr 13 '12 at 2:22
    
@RobG right, thanks, fixed. –  Umbrella Apr 13 '12 at 2:29

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