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I got this code:

myString = 'blabla123_01_version6688_01_01Long_stringWithNumbers'
versionSplit = re.findall(r'-?\d+|[a-zA-Z!@#$%^&*()_+.,<>{}]+|\W+?', myString)

for i in reversed(versionSplit):
    id = versionSplit.index(i)
    if i.isdigit():
        digit = '%0'+str(len(i))+'d'
        i = int(i) + 1
        i = digit % i
        versionSplit[id]=str(i)
        break

final = ''
myString = final.join(versionSplit)
print myString

Which suppose to increase ONLY the last digit from the string given. But if you run that code you will see that if there is the same digit in the string as the last one it will increase it one after the other if you keep running the script. Can anyone help me find out why?

Thank you in advance for any help

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1  
id is a reserved python word, change it for something else (that's not related to your question by the way) –  heltonbiker Apr 13 '12 at 3:00
    
The line id = versionSplit.index(i) finds the first occurence, not the last one as you intend –  David Robinson Apr 13 '12 at 3:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The issue is the use of the list.index() function on line 5. This returns the index of the first occurrence of a value in a list, from left to right, but the code is iterating over the reversed list (right to left). There are lots of ways to straighten this out, but here's one that makes the fewest changes to your existing code: Iterate over indices in reverse (avoids reversing the list).

for idx in range(len(versionSplit)-1, -1, -1):
    i = versionSplit[idx]
    if chunk.isdigit():
        digit = '%0'+str(len(i))+'d'
        i = int(i) + 1
        i = digit % i
        versionSplit[idx]=str(i)
        break
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1  
for idx in reversed(range(len(versionSplit))): –  dbr Apr 13 '12 at 3:17
    
I thank you very much for this great explanantion –  cloud68 Apr 13 '12 at 4:36

Is there a reason why you aren't doing something like this instead:

prefix, version = re.match(r"(.*[^\d]+)([\d]+)$", myString).groups()
newstring = prefix + str(int(version)+1).rjust(len(version), '0')

Notes:

  • This will actually "carry over" the version numbers properly: ("09" -> "10") and ("99" -> "100")
  • This regex assumes at least one non-numeric character before the final version substring at the end. If this is not matched, it will throw an AttributeError. You could restructure it to throw a more suitable or specific exception (e.g. if re.match(...) returns None; see comments below for more info).

Adjust accordingly.

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Not tested, but I suspect this will do unhelpful things if the string doesn't end in a digit? –  dbr Apr 13 '12 at 3:21
1  
That's the typical solution that looks beyond what is being answered. I like it. +1 –  heltonbiker Apr 13 '12 at 3:21
    
@dbr The list is supposed to end in a digit. An exception or an error would need to be thrown if not so, I think. –  heltonbiker Apr 13 '12 at 3:22
1  
@heltonbiker exactly, the OP specified that the string ends with version digits. If this is not the case, the re.match will return a NoneType which doesnt have a .groups() and will in turn throw an AttributeError (this can of course be restructured to throw a more specific exception), which can then be wrapped in a try/catch exception block (since then it is an exceptional case) –  Preet Kukreti Apr 13 '12 at 3:25
1  
I mention this because the if i.isdigit(): check in the original code implies the trailing number may be optional (if so, checking if re.match returns None is better than catching the AttributeError!) –  dbr Apr 13 '12 at 3:29
myString = 'blabla123_01_version6688_01_01veryLong_stringWithNumbers01'
versionSplit = re.findall(r'-?\d+|[^\-\d]+', myString)

for i in xrange(len(versionSplit) - 1, -1, -1):
    s = versionSplit[i]
    if s.isdigit():
        n = int(s) + 1
        versionSplit[i] = "%0*d" % (len(s), n)
        break

myString = ''.join(versionSplit)
print myString

Notes:

  • It is silly to use the .index() method to try to find the string. Just use a decrementing index to try each part of versionSplit. This was where your problem was, as commented above by @David Robinson.

  • Don't use id as a variable name; you are covering up the built-in function id().

  • This code is using the * in a format template, which will accept an integer and set the width.

  • I simplified the pattern: either you are matching a digit (with optional leading minus sign) or else you are matching non-digits.

  • I tested this and it seems to work.

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I thank you very much for this great explanantion –  cloud68 Apr 13 '12 at 4:36

First, three notes:

  1. id is a reserved python word;
  2. For joining, a more pythonic idiom is ''.join(), using a literal empty string
  3. reversed() returns an iterator, not a list. That's why I use list(reversed()), in order to do rev.index(i) later.

Corrected code:

import re

myString = 'blabla123_01_version6688_01_01veryLong_stringWithNumbers01'
print myString
versionSplit = re.findall(r'-?\d+|[a-zA-Z!@#$%^&*()_+.,<>{}]+|\W+?', myString)

rev = list(reversed(versionSplit))  # create a reversed list to work with from now on

for i in rev:
    idd = rev.index(i)
    if i.isdigit():
        digit = '%0'+str(len(i))+'d'
        i = int(i) + 1
        i = digit % i
        rev[idd]=str(i)
        break

myString = ''.join(reversed(rev))  # reverse again only just before joining
print myString
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