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Does anyone happen to know where, if at all possible, I can take a look at the code of the java's built-in libraries?

I've tried Ctrl + Shift + B (which is the Netbeans' equivalence of Eclipse's Ctrl + Shift T) to "go to source", but I can only see the method header, and the body is always:

//compiled code
throw new RuntimeException("Compiled Code");

For instance, I'd see the following if I tried to view String.charAt(int)

public char charAt(int i)
{
    //compiled code
    throw new RuntimeException("Compiled Code");
}
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2  
Do you mean the JDK? Because you can get the source for the JDK easy as pie. –  Bohemian Apr 13 '12 at 5:21
    
Refer to this topic - stackoverflow.com/questions/4512066/… - for more help. –  Sanjeev Kulkarni N Apr 13 '12 at 5:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

built-in libraries source code is available with jdk. For example on a windows box the jdk folder would contain src.zip which contain the sources for the built-in libraries

Hope this helps.

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Sure, JDK is distributed with sources, you can conveniently open them in your IDE. Look for "src.jar".

It probably already is set up. In Eclipse, just try to Ctrl-Shift-T something like "java.lang.String".

A web search will also turn up nicely linked and formatted pages.

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I tried Ctrl + Shift + B, which is the Netbeans' equivalence of Ctrl + Shift + T, but I can only see the method header, where the body is //compiled code throw new RuntimeException("Compiled Code"); –  One Two Three Apr 13 '12 at 5:42

Google "java decompiler" and download it. You can see the source code for any class file in the libraries.

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You can also use jad to decompile any .class file

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