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I had an existing Django project that I've just added South to.

  • I ran syncdb locally.
  • I ran manage.py schemamigration app_name locally
  • I ran manage.py migrate app_name --fake locally
  • I commit and pushed to heroku master
  • I ran syncdb on heroku
  • I ran manage.py schemamigration app_name on heroku
  • I ran manage.py migrate app_name on heroku

I then receive this:

$ heroku run python notecard/manage.py migrate notecards
Running python notecard/manage.py migrate notecards attached to terminal... up, run.1
Running migrations for notecards:
 - Migrating forwards to 0005_initial.
 > notecards:0003_initial
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "notecard/manage.py", line 14, in <module>
    execute_manager(settings)
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/django/core/management/__init__.py", line 438, in execute_manager
    utility.execute()
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/django/core/management/__init__.py", line 379, in execute
    self.fetch_command(subcommand).run_from_argv(self.argv)
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/django/core/management/base.py", line 191, in run_from_argv
    self.execute(*args, **options.__dict__)
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/django/core/management/base.py", line 220, in execute
    output = self.handle(*args, **options)
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/south/management/commands/migrate.py", line 105, in handle
    ignore_ghosts = ignore_ghosts,
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/south/migration/__init__.py", line 191, in migrate_app
    success = migrator.migrate_many(target, workplan, database)
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/south/migration/migrators.py", line 221, in migrate_many
    result = migrator.__class__.migrate_many(migrator, target, migrations, database)
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/south/migration/migrators.py", line 292, in migrate_many
    result = self.migrate(migration, database)
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/south/migration/migrators.py", line 125, in migrate
    result = self.run(migration)
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/south/migration/migrators.py", line 99, in run
    return self.run_migration(migration)
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/south/migration/migrators.py", line 81, in run_migration
    migration_function()
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/south/migration/migrators.py", line 57, in <lambda>
    return (lambda: direction(orm))
  File "/app/notecard/notecards/migrations/0003_initial.py", line 15, in forwards
    ('user', self.gf('django.db.models.fields.related.ForeignKey')(to=orm['auth.User'])),
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/south/db/generic.py", line 226, in create_table
    ', '.join([col for col in columns if col]),
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/south/db/generic.py", line 150, in execute
    cursor.execute(sql, params)
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/django/db/backends/util.py", line 34, in execute
    return self.cursor.execute(sql, params)
  File "/app/lib/python2.7/site-packages/django/db/backends/postgresql_psycopg2/base.py", line 44, in execute
    return self.cursor.execute(query, args)
django.db.utils.DatabaseError: relation "notecards_semester" already exists

I have 3 models. Section, Semester, and Notecards. I've added one field to the Notecards model and I cannot get it added on Heroku.

Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You must fake the migrations that create the tables, then run the other migrations as usual.

manage.py migrate app_name 000X --fake
manage.py migrate app_name 

With 000X being the number of the migration in which you create the table.

share|improve this answer
    
When I run manage.py migrate app_name 0005 --fake on heroku. and then run manage.py migrate app_name, I receive Nothing to migrate. Loading initial data for app_name. No fixtures found. –  Dan Hoerst Apr 13 '12 at 14:38
1  
Ok, your migrations are completly messed up. It's going to be ery hard to help you unless we have the complete historic of what you did on dev and prod, starting from BEFORE migration one. We need details. Lots of them. Give us all the code you wrote, then all the modifications you made, all the migration commands you ran, and on which machine. The whole list. –  e-satis Apr 13 '12 at 14:57
    
Thank you. I can do this. One thing that may make things easier... I only made one change to the models in code - I added a single field to a single model. I could easily remove this field and be back to the original state of the database pre-South. If I do this, can I just delete the migrations folder and start again - the correct way? If not, I will gather as much info as possible. Thanks! –  Dan Hoerst Apr 13 '12 at 15:01
2  
Yes, you can. Remove the field. Delete the migration folder. Reset the migration database (manage.py flushdb south). Then create the initinal migration (manage.py schemamigration --initial), fake applying it (manage.py migrate --fake). Add the field, and create the real migration (manage.py schemamigration --auto) then apply (manage.py migrate). –  e-satis Apr 13 '12 at 15:04
    
Awesome. Much easier. Just to be sure, following your instructions above, I do all of this locally or on Heroku? Sorry to be annoying, I'm trying to make sure I do this correctly this time as the tutorial I followed did not lead me correctly, or I messed up big time at some point. Thank you again. –  Dan Hoerst Apr 13 '12 at 15:09

First of all, from the looks of 0003_initial and 0005_initial, you've done multiple schemamigration myapp --initial commands which add create_table statements. Having two sets of these will definitely cause problems as one will create tables, then the next one will attempt creating existing tables.

Your migrations folder is probably completely polluted with odd migrations.

Anyways, while I understand the theory of running schemamigration on the local machine AND the remote machine, this is probably the root of your problem. Schemamigration generates a new migration - if you have to run it on your development server, commit it, push it, then generate yet another one on your production machine, you'll probably end up with overlapping migrations.

Another thing: if you are running syncdb on your remote machine and it's generating tables, that means your database is 100% current -- no migrations needed. You'd do a full migrate --fake to match your migrations to your database.

I ran syncdb locally.
I ran manage.py schemamigration app_name locally
I ran manage.py migrate app_name --fake locally
I commit and pushed to heroku master 
I ran syncdb on heroku 

I ran manage.py schemamigration app_name on heroku
# if you ran syncdb, your DB would be in the final state.
I ran manage.py migrate app_name on heroku
# if you ran syncdb, your DB would be in the final state. Nothing to migrate.
share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you. While your explanation is great for how the problem may have occurred, I'm still stuck on how to actually resolve the issue at this point. You say if I ran syncdb, my DB would be in the final state - it is not. If I fake the migration on Heroku to 0005 (the final state), and then run the migration again, I receive Nothing to migrate. Loading initial data for app_name. No fixtures found. –  Dan Hoerst Apr 13 '12 at 14:45

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