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I want to use awk to replace text inside of a list of files. I think this is the right tool for the job, because of this:

"Several kinds of tasks occur repeatedly when working with text files. You might want to extract certain lines and discard the rest. Or you may need to make changes wherever certain patterns appear, but leave the rest of the file alone."

http://www.gnu.org/software/gawk/manual/gawk.html

That's exactly what I want to do.

awk reads filelist.txt (this is a file that contains the path to each file to be modified) matches pattern.txt (this is a file that contains a javascript and is what I wish to cull from all the htm files contained in filelist.txt)

The reason I use filelist.txt is that there are several files to which I want to remove the javascript, and they're in multiple places.

The reason I want to use pattern.txt is that the javascript contains all sorts of things, like spaces, special characters and the such.

If I try to feed awk the whole javascript, I will have to escape all the special characters contained therein, one after the other, and it will be very time consuming. (and probably wouldn't work and be incredibly complex!)

If I try to put just the beginning of the javascript and the end, such as with this:

awk '/<\/SCRIPT>/{p=1;print}/<\/script>/{p=0}!p'    

I run the risk that i will remove all instances of embedded javascript, not just the desired one.

Is what I'm trying to do feasible with awk?

This hinges on my belief that providing it with a file will make it interpret the whole content of the file as the pattern, and not choke on the first symbol in encounters.

share|improve this question
4  
good question, you can make it better by adding sample data, and sample required output from that data. Good luck. –  shellter Apr 13 '12 at 5:47
    
If your site was hacked, the only reasonable remedy is to roll back to a known-good backup or snapshot from version control. There is a reason you are already using both, you know ... –  tripleee Apr 13 '12 at 10:47

3 Answers 3

TXR performs whole-file pattern matching. In a TXR pattern, you just have to escape one character @. This has a special meaning so to encode a literal @, just write @@. (One more character has a special meaning, actualy: a single space (i.e. not adjacent to another space). This is treated as the regular expression "match one or more spaces", which is a little bit of slackness that you often want.

@(collect)
@  (cases)
text you want to
change to something
else
@    (output)
multi line
replacement
@    (end)
@  (or)
@line
@    (output)
@line
@    (end)
@  (end)
@(end)

The language isn't geared toward text filtering so much, where you just keep reams of text the same, and substitute in a few places, but it will do the job with a little bit of coding. Here we have a line oriented @(collect) which contains two pattern-matching cases: a multi line thing, and a fallback case to just grab one line. If the multi-line thing matches, the input will advance past it automatically; it's like tokenizing, except over lines rather than characters.

You can match a trailing context (which is not consumed) with @(trailer), e.g.

text you want to
change to something
else
@(trailer)
which must be followed by
this part that is not
consumed; and the match
continues within this part

The text you want to change to something else could be factored out to a pattern function which is in a separate file:

@(define matchtext)
text you want to
change to something
else
@(end)
@(define replacement)
@  (output)
multi line
replacement
@  (end)    
@(end)

Then just:

@(load "text-and-replacement")
@(collect)
@  (cases)
@    (matchtext)
@    (replacement)
@  (or)
@line
@    (output)
@line
@    (end)
@  (end)
@(end)
share|improve this answer

Well I failed at the command line, but I succeeded at my task.

I used a program called easy find found @ http://www.devon-technologies.com and used the variable createDocumentFragm to find all the documents that were changed.

Then I used Search&Replace found @ http://searchreplaceapp.com and pasted the entire JavaScript, excluding the script tags at the start & end, unhid the files manually for the second pass, then manually removed the glob of JavaScript for the 12 out of the 1050 that caused find&replace to crash. I had to edit those by hand.

So... fail on the command line, pass on the lame-o gui tools.

Thank you all so much for your answers.

:(

(I think Ineed to learn Perl, a worthwhile endeavor, as I suspect I'm going to run across similar instances in the near future.)

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I'm not sure that awk is the right tool for this job. It normally prints to standard output, whereas you seem to want to overwrite the original files.

For that, Perl has a built-in mechanism: perl -i.bak will overwrite the files, creating a backup copy of each one with the optional suffix .bak; if you omit the suffix, you don't get a backup.

If I understand your pattern matching scenario correctly, you have a fairly substantial piece of JavaScript code on a single line that you need to remove from the data files. However, those files might well contain other fragments of JavaScript, so you can't simply look for lines with a simple start. Again, I think that Perl would be better. You could read the pattern.txt file into a variable, and then create a regex from that variable with appropriate adornments to suppress all the special meanings for metacharacters (\Q and \E; would your JavaScript ever contain \E?). Perl allows you to slurp whole files into memory, and then apply multiline regexes to the entire file — properties which might well be of use in this code. I'm not sure whether (how) slurping mixes with the -i option; that would have to be checked.

None of those special tricks are readily available in awk (not even gawk), leading me to think that awk is probably not the best tool for the job. I use Perl because I learned it long ago. I expect that Python or Ruby or any other newer scripting language is likely to be able to manage it too.


Perl demo

slurper.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl -i.bak
use strict;
use warnings;

my $pattfile = shift;
my $pattern;
{
    open my $ph, '<', $pattfile or die "Failed to open $pattfile: $!";
    local $/;
    $pattern = <$ph>;
}

# chomp removes what's in $/ - don't chomp while $/ is undef!
chomp $pattern;

my $regex = qr{ \Q$pattern\E }mx;

# Slurp each file in turn
local $/;
while (<>)
{
    s/$regex//g;
    print;
}

Before

p:

X ok X ok

x:

abcXdef
X ok X ok

y:

abcXdef
X ok X ok
no x's here

z:

no x's here either
abcXdef
X ok X ok

Execute

$ perl slurper.pl p x y z
$ ls ? ?.bak
p     x     x.bak y     y.bak z     z.bak
$

After

p:

X ok X ok

x:

abcXdef

y:

abcXdef

no x's here

z:

no x's here either
abcXdef
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 nice answer! –  glenn jackman Apr 13 '12 at 13:12
    
Thank you so much. Although I found a temporary, albeit bodgy solution, I think I'm going to head down to the bookstore and pickup the oreilly book on learning perl. –  John Taggart Apr 13 '12 at 17:01

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