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I have strings like this:

"PQR23 on abc62", "PQR112 on efg7", "PQR9 on efg76" and so on

Now I would like to arrange this strings taking number in first character in ascending order.

so expected output should be

PQR112 on efg7
PQR23 on abc62
PQR9 on efg76 

and so on

I am new to perl, doing homework and searching on net, but not received perfect soln so far. Thanks.

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closed as not a real question by Alex Reynolds, flesk, Sinan Ünür, brian d foy, Graviton Apr 16 '12 at 1:59

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
What have you tried? If you set $a="PQR23 on abc62"; and $b="PQR9 on efg76;, can you create an expression that determines if $a should be before $b? – Anders Lindahl Apr 13 '12 at 6:35

I am not sure what you want that a simple lexical sort doesn't provide. The program belows seems to do what you have specified.

use strict;
use warnings;

my @strings = (
  "PQR23 on abc62",
  "PQR112 on efg7", 
  "PQR9 on efg76",
);

print "$_\n" for sort @strings;

output

PQR112 on efg7
PQR23 on abc62
PQR9 on efg76

Edit

If you want to ignore the prefix letters, then a code block for sort will do the trick

use strict;
use warnings;

my @strings = (
  "ABC23 on abc62",
  "PQR112 on efg7", 
  "XYZ9 on efg76",
);

print "$_\n"  for sort {
  my ($aa) = $a =~ /(\d)/;
  my ($bb) = $b =~ /(\d)/;
  $aa cmp $bb;
} @strings;

output

PQR112 on efg7
ABC23 on abc62
XYZ9 on efg76
share|improve this answer
    
This latter example is much shorter using List::UtilsBy: use List::UtilsBy qw( sort_by ); print "$_\n" for sort_by { ( /(\d+)/ )[0] } @strings; – LeoNerd Apr 13 '12 at 12:22

You could also use Schwartzian Transform like that, very efficient if your array is big:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my @strings = (
  "PQR23 on abc62",
  "PQR112 on efg7", 
  "PQR9 on efg76",
);

my @result = 
    map { $_->[0] }
    sort { $a->[1] <=> $b->[1]}
    map { [$_, /(\d)/] }
    @strings;

print Dumper\@result;

output:

$VAR1 = [
          'PQR112 on efg7',
          'PQR23 on abc62',
          'PQR9 on efg76'
        ];
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for Schwartzian Transform – Nikhil Jain Apr 13 '12 at 13:09
use strict;
use warnings;
my @sorted_strings=sort("PQR23 on abc62", "PQR112 on efg7", "PQR9 on efg76");
print join ("\n",@sorted_strings);

Output

PQR112 on efg7
PQR23 on abc62
PQR9 on efg76
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