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Consider the following scenario.

I have a method which returns ISomething, but it could be Something or Wrapped<Something>. I therefore cast the result to Something to use it, but it fails, any help as to why or how to resolve it would be greatly appreciated.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var a = new DerivedSomething();
        var b = (DerivedSomething)new Wrapped<DerivedSomething>(a); //success
        var c = (DerivedSomething)_GetSomething(false); //success, obsiously!
        var d = (DerivedSomething)_GetSomething(true); //Unable to cast object of type 'test_bed.Wrapped`1[test_bed.DerivedSomething]' to type 'test_bed.DerivedSomething'.
        var e = (DerivedSomething)(ISomething)new Wrapped<DerivedSomething>(a);  //Unable to cast object of type 'test_bed.Wrapped`1[test_bed.DerivedSomething]' to type 'test_bed.DerivedSomething'.

        var works = ((DerivedSomething)_GetSomething(false)).DoSomethingElse(); 
        var fails = ((DerivedSomething)_GetSomething(true)).DoSomethingElse(); //cast exception
    }

    private static ISomething _GetSomething(bool wrap)
    {
        var something = new DerivedSomething();
        return wrap ? new Wrapped<DerivedSomething>(something) : (ISomething)something;
    }
}

public interface ISomething
{
    void DoSomething();
}

public abstract class Something : ISomething
{
    public void DoSomething()
    {
        //some code
    }
}

public class DerivedSomething : Something
{
    public void DoSomething()
    {
        //some code
    }

    public void DoSomethingElse()
    {
        //some code
    }
}

public class Wrapped<T> : ISomething
    where T : ISomething
{
    private readonly T _something;

    public Wrapped(T something)
    {
        _something = something;
    }

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        _something.DoSomething();
    }

    public static explicit operator T(Wrapped<T> wrapped)
    {
        return wrapped._something;
    }
}

It appears that if the type is exposed as the interface when trying to cast, then the operator is not found?

The 'easy' solution would be to write a 'unwrap' function which optionally unwraps the Wrapped<Something> to Something, but i'd prefer to use operators if possible.

Edit

I think the crux of the problem is: outside of _GetSomething() i wont know whether Something or Wrapped<Something> is going to be returned.

share|improve this question
    
I don't think that Wrapped<Something> can be cast to Something. I compiled your example, and verified that. The first cast (variable b) should fail.... –  Ethan Brown Apr 13 '12 at 7:11
    
I guess you are asking why doesn't explicit operator T(Wrapped<T> wrapped) allow the cast to the passed concrete type and not just the constrained type. –  Jodrell Apr 13 '12 at 8:00
    
@EthanBrown - The explicit cast is designed to perform the casting, it works correctly in case B, the question is why it doesn't work for case D or E –  Simon Laing Apr 13 '12 at 12:15
    
I therefore cast the result to Something to use it: Why do you need to downcast to Something in the first place? The fact that it and Wrapped<T> both implement ISomething is a clear indication that at least to some extent they should be indistinguishable. –  shambulator Apr 13 '12 at 12:52
    
@Anton, hopefully the revised code in the question highlights my problem a little better? –  Simon Laing Apr 13 '12 at 13:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cast operator looks like this:

public static explicit operator T(Wrapped<T> wrapped)
{
        return wrapped._something;
}

and you're casting like

var d = (Something)_GetSomething(true); //FAILS!

You can not cast to Something , cause Something is a concrete implementation of the T:ISomething. TO make this work you need to write:

var d = (ISomething)_GetSomething(true); //SUCCESS!

or

if you really want to use concrete type, you can define generic like:

public class Wrapped<T> : Something //Something and NOT ISomething 
    where T : ISomething
{
    .....
    .....
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Tigran, _GetSomething() already emits ISomething, therefore the cast is unneccessary? –  Simon Laing Apr 13 '12 at 12:25
    
@SimonLaing: correct. I just show esplicitly that you need to change the definition of generic or use a double cast like in other posts provided here. –  Tigran Apr 13 '12 at 12:26
    
unfortunately Something relates to any number of classes which i am trying to wrap in a generic way. Therefore there would need to be as many Wrapped<T> classes as there are Something classes, something im keen to avoid! –  Simon Laing Apr 13 '12 at 12:40
    
@SimonLaing: ok, but at this point just do not cast to concrete type but use ISomething like an interface that refers to a concrete implementation. –  Tigran Apr 13 '12 at 12:41
1  
@SimonLaing: I understand that.My point is that if you arhitect your code in OOP way, you should not need to have cast to concrete type, except rare cases. Cause all that concrete types share the same set of functions available in the ISomething. So if you write ISomething somethign = GetSomethign(); who cares abnout concrete type behind that? Just use something. –  Tigran Apr 13 '12 at 12:52

The explicit convert is bound at compile time (an extra hint is that the convert operator is static).

Try

var f = (Something)(Wrapped<Something>)_GetSomething(true);

This succeeds

In your case the compiler just knows that your type is ISomething and does not know how to convert an ISomething to a Something unless that happends to be a Something already.

By changing public class Wrapped<T> : ISomething to public class Wrapped<T> : Something your example execute fine, but your cast is not invoked since Wrapped<T> is already a T.

Note:
The explicit operator is not a cast, but a type conversion, it a method called and that method is resolved based on the compile time type (in your case ISomething). It is a source of confusion that type conversion has the same syntax as type casting. Casting is just assigning an existing object to a different variable of a compatible type while type conversion actually returns a new object.

share|improve this answer
    
Albin, your example would work, except for the scenario where false is passed to _GetSomething(). In this case Something could not be converted to Wrapped<Something>. –  Simon Laing Apr 13 '12 at 12:17
    
My scenario requires that Wrapped<T> does not inherit, it purely consumes T. Is the compiler only understanding the type by its exposed type (ISomething - as the return from _GetSomething()) rather than actual type emited from the method? –  Simon Laing Apr 13 '12 at 12:19
    
@SimonLaing, you can not, because the type must be known at compile time (by having a variable of type or casting). I updated my answer with some notes about the difference between casting and conversion. –  Albin Sunnanbo Apr 13 '12 at 12:27
    
@SimonLaing, when you have created your interface ISomething you better use that interface all the way along instead of trying to convert to a concrete type. –  Albin Sunnanbo Apr 13 '12 at 12:30
    
I think type conversion is what i require here, as i'm introducing a method to dictate how to convert Wrapped<T> to T. Is there a way to achieve the desired result without changing the type hierarchy? –  Simon Laing Apr 13 '12 at 12:37
var d = (Something)(Wrapped<Something>)_GetSomething(true); 
var e = (Something)new Wrapped<Something>(a);
share|improve this answer
    
Danny, your example would work, except for the scenario where false is passed to _GetSomething(). In this case Something could not be converted to Wrapped<Something> –  Simon Laing Apr 13 '12 at 12:22

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