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I have a Web application that allows to upload Outlook Mails (*.msg) with File Upload. The customer want to forbid the store Mails that are Digitaly Signed or Encrypted. So after uploading the Mail I should someshow check the mail if it's Signed or Encrypted.

If there a way to check that? Like a pattern in the Stream of the File?

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You really need to specify what you mean by "digitaly signed". If you mean "Rights Managed Email Message" (defined by Microsoft), by all means, follow the post by @Michael.J.Gray. –  GalacticJello Apr 28 '12 at 6:51
    
If you mean "Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions" (SMIME), which is the format that most of the rest of the world uses, then you need to follow my post. –  GalacticJello Apr 28 '12 at 6:52
    
Could you clarify? –  GalacticJello Apr 28 '12 at 6:53

3 Answers 3

Checking for the English words not only is valid, but it is the actual documented way.

Refer to the authority:

2.1.3.1.3 Recognizing a Message Object that Represents a Clear-Signed Message

If a Message object has a message class (PidTagMessageClass property ([MS-OXCMSG] section 2.2.1.3)) value of "IPM.Note.SMIME.MultipartSigned" and contains exactly one Attachment object, it SHOULD be treated as a clear-signed message. Additional verification steps can be performed to verify that the Attachment object is marked with the appropriate media type (for example, the PidTagAttachMimeTag property ([MS-OXPROPS] section 2.680) has a value of "multipart/signed") and represents a valid multipart/signed MIME entity as specified in [RFC1847]. If the message class value is not "IPM.Note.SMIME.MultipartSigned" but it ends with the suffix ".SMIME.MultipartSigned", the Message object MAY<7><8> be treated as a clear-signed message.

If a Message object with a message class value of "IPM.Note.SMIME.MultipartSigned" does not have the structure specified in section 2.1.3.1, the behavior is undefined.

2.1.3.2.3 Recognizing a Message Object that Represents an Opaque-Signed or Encrypted S/MIME

If a Message object has the message class (PidTagMessageClass property ([MS-OXCMSG] section 2.2.1.3)) value of "IPM.Note.SMIME" and contains exactly one Attachment object, it SHOULD be treated as an opaque-signed message or an encrypted message. Additional verification steps can be performed to verify that the Attachment object is marked with the appropriate media type (for example, the PidTagAttachMimeTag property ([MS-OXPROPS] section 2.680) is either "application/pkcs7-mime" or "application/x-pkcs7-mime", or it is "application/octet-stream" and filename, as specified by the PidTagAttachFilename property ([MS-OXPROPS] section 2.671), and has a file extension ".p7m") and represents a valid encrypted or opaque-signed message, as specified in [RFC3852]. If the value of the message class is not "IPM.Note.SMIME", but ends with the suffix ".SMIME", then the Message object MAY<11> be treated as an opaque-signed message or an encrypted message.

The message class value "IPM.Note.SMIME" can be ambiguous.<12>

If a Message object has a message class value of "IPM.Note.SMIME" does not have the appropriate structure or content as specified in section 2.1.3.2, then the behavior is undefined.

EDIT:

To be more specific, yes, you SHOULD look for a "pattern in the Stream of the file".

Specifically, if the MSG is unicode, you would scan the "__substg1.0_001A001F" stream, and check for the patterns mentioned above.

The MSG file is an OLE Structured Storage file that contains streams and storages. To get at the streams, use an OLE Storage library like OpenMCDF if you are in the C# world. There are similar ones for java, python, etc.

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+1 for nice answer –  MByD Apr 23 '12 at 22:36
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This doesn't say to just check for English words, as described in my original post... which is what I assume you are referring to. Even if it were documented as I had described, it wouldn't be a good idea; no matter how authoritative the one recommending the practice was. –  Michael J. Gray Apr 25 '12 at 0:01

To open the message and look into, I suggest you to use Outlook Redemption. This is what I use and it works without Outlook installed on the server. If the GetMessageFromMsgFile method returns an RDOEncryptedMessage, it means your mail is encrypted or signed.

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This blog post describes the format pretty well and another post by the same author describes exactly what you're after, which is information on rights managed mail messages.

Essentially as long as the message conforms to the file format these posts and specifications should give you all you need to check for signatures and encryption.

Checking for English words is a bad idea. What if users don't write in English and what if a psuedo-random stream of encrypted data happens to create words like "or" or "and" in some encoding they're using? It's just not reliable.

EDIT:

To clarify what I mean when I say that checking for English words is a bad idea, I mean to say that simply scanning over the file and verifying if a certain set of words is present is the bad idea. Since someone down voted this solution, I feel that they may have misunderstood what I was saying because of this ambiguity.

As another user indicated in their answer, parsing the object out and actually handling conditions in the data is fine. You can see from their post that it is the documented method and works fine, because it's based on the standards. This is similar to the information I gave here with the two posts and the format specification.

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@MichaelJ.Gray Thanks for your answer. I think it's a good one and i'm also with you about the english words parsing. However I will wait a bit more with accepting the answer to see if something more comes in. –  gsharp Apr 26 '12 at 15:50

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