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Possible Duplicate:
Preventing non-const lvalues from resolving to rvalue reference instead of const lvalue reference
Conflict between copy constructor and forwarding constructor

I have these classes that I need for storing std::unique_ptr (adapted boost::any):

class any
{
public:
  any()
    : content(0)
  {
  }

  any(any const&) = delete;

  any(any && other)
    : content(other.content)
  {
    content = 0;
  }

  template<typename ValueType>
  any(ValueType const& value)
    : content(new holder<ValueType>(value))
  {
  }

  template<typename ValueType>
  any(ValueType && value,
    typename std::enable_if<!std::is_lvalue_reference<ValueType>::value,
    void>::type* = 0)
    : content(new holder<ValueType>(std::move(value)))
  {
  }

  ~any()
  {
    delete content;
  }

public: // modifiers

  any & swap(any & rhs)
  {
    std::swap(content, rhs.content);
    return *this;
  }

  any & operator=(const any &) = delete;

  any & operator=(any && rhs)
  {
    return swap(rhs);
  }

  template<typename ValueType>
  any & operator=(ValueType const& rhs)
  {
    any(rhs).swap(*this);
    return *this;
  }

  template<typename ValueType>
  typename std::enable_if<!std::is_lvalue_reference<ValueType>::value,
    any&>::type operator=(ValueType && rhs)
  {
    any(std::move(rhs)).swap(*this);
    return *this;
  }

public: // queries

  bool empty() const
  {
    return !content;
  }

  const std::type_info & type() const
  {
    return content ? content->type() : typeid(void);
  }

private: // types

  class placeholder
  {
  public: // structors

  virtual ~placeholder()
  {
  }

  public: // queries
    virtual const std::type_info & type() const = 0;
  };

  template<typename ValueType>
  class holder : public placeholder
  {
  public: // structors
    template <class T>
    holder(T && value)
      : held(std::forward<T>(value))
    {
    }

    holder & operator=(const holder &) = delete;

  public: // queries
    virtual const std::type_info & type() const
    {
      return typeid(ValueType);
    }

  public:

    ValueType held;
  };

private: // representation

  template<typename ValueType>
  friend ValueType * any_cast(any *);

  template<typename ValueType>
  friend ValueType * unsafe_any_cast(any *);

  placeholder * content;
};

and this test case:

any a;
any b(a);

b = a;

and this one:

std::map<int, int> map({{1,1},{2,2}});
any b(map);
std::cout << map.size() << std::endl; // displays 0

To my horror, under gdb, I've noticed that the move constructor and the move assignment operator are called when constructing and assigning b (even from map), even though I did not tag a with std::move and it is not a temporary. Can someone explain why?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Konrad Rudolph, Luc Danton, Howard Hinnant, Nicol Bolas, Bo Persson Apr 13 '12 at 16:10

This question was marked as an exact duplicate of an existing question.

1  
Some consistent indentation would be really helpful. – Konrad Rudolph Apr 13 '12 at 8:41
    
I've edited the boost::any hack for posterity. – user1095108 Apr 13 '12 at 15:15

My first answer was wrong. After reading through your very unreadable code again I see that you have explicitly provided a move and default constructor, but no copy constructor. If a class has any user defined constructor (of which you have two), the compiler will not generate any other constructors for that class. Hence, your class does not have a copy constructor.

Edit: So, back to my original answer (prompted by your comment). §12.8/7 [class.copy] says:

A member function template is never instantiated to perform the copy of a class object to an object of its class type. [Example:

struct S { 
    template<typename T> S(T); 
    template<typename T> S(T&&);
    S(); 
}; 

S f(); 
const S g; 

void h() { 
    S a( f() );          // does not instantiate member template; 
                         // uses the implicitly generated move
    constructor S a(g);  // does not instantiate the member template; 
                         // uses the implicitly generated copy constructor
}

—end example ]

Since your copy contructor is a member-template, but your move constructor is not, the later is chosen here (your case is different from the example in that respect).

share|improve this answer
    
This constructor is not chosen, as explained in my edit. – Björn Pollex Apr 13 '12 at 9:02
    
The move template constructor is called, not the any move constructor, also check the construction from map, why is it moved? – user1095108 Apr 13 '12 at 9:06
    
Hm, then I do not know. Perhaps you could provide a minimal program so that we can reproduce your problem locally? – Björn Pollex Apr 13 '12 at 9:08
    
@user1095108: If you want help, you have to put some work into your question. This includes providing a program that I can copy/paste and then compile and execute to reproduce your problem. Also, which compiler and boost-version are you using? – Björn Pollex Apr 13 '12 at 9:13
    
The correct answer is that ˙T&&˙ is a catch-all parameter in template functions and apparently also constructors. See stackoverflow.com/questions/7748104/… for solution. – user1095108 Apr 13 '12 at 12:06

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