Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have spent a few days learning Objective-C and have a few questions about @property. I have experience with C# so understand the need for pointers, initialization etc.

So as an example:

 @interface MyClass : NSObject
 {
      IBOutlet UIImageView *image;
 }

 @property (retain, nonatomic) UIImageView *image

 @end

 @implementation MyClass
      @synthesise image
 @end

I understand that @synthesise is used to create the @property. But I have a few questions just to help me clear things up:

  1. Does the @property duplicate or replace my original definition, or does it merely set up the mutibility and atomicity of the original?
  2. Does @synthesise remove my need to use image = [[UIImageView alloc] init]?
  3. If I do not provide a @property and still go ahead creating and destroying my variable manually, does that make any difference?

Ultimately, is the difference between the 2, @property gives you more flexibility with regards to memory management and multi-threading and the normal one gives you the defaults.

share|improve this question
2  
@prototype is not an Objective-C keyword. Do you mean @property? – zpasternack Apr 13 '12 at 7:59
    
You mean @property, right – willc2 Apr 13 '12 at 8:00
    
Yes sorry, was typing on mobile phone. Will change it shortly. Thanks for spotting it. – Dominic Zukiewicz Apr 13 '12 at 8:10
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Does the @prototype duplicate or replace my original definition, or does it merely set up the mutibility and atomicity of the original?

The ivar declaration of image is redundant when using the most recent compiler releases.

The former declares an ivar (type + name + instance storage).

The property declaration specifies the type, name, storage (in more recent compiler releases), declares the accessor methods (e.g. - (UIImageView *)image; and - (void)setImage:(UIImageView *)pImage;), and other property specifiers (which are used when the accessors are generated by the compiler).

Does @synthesise remove my need to use image = [UIImageView alloc]?

No. You still need to implement your initializer and dealloc (in MRC) appropriately.

If I do not provide an @property and still go ahead creating and destroying my variable manually, does that make any difference?

That would be fine, when you do not want/need boilerplate accessor methods generated for you. It's a design choice. Not every ivar needs accessor methods.

Ultimately, is the difference between the 2, @property gives you more flexibility with regards to memory management and multi-threading and the normal one gives you the defaults.

The biggest reason they exist is convenience. Properties save a lot of boilerplate code.

There is no more flexibility with properties -- properties implement the most practical uses.

It's infrequent that atomicity (in this context) is equivalent to proper thread safety and correct concurrent execution.

share|improve this answer

1) The property does not replace the class member. A property is a declaration that you want the accessors (getter and setter) for a class member to perform certain "automatic" tasks and have a certain name.

For example:

@interface MyClass : NSObject
{
    NSInteger __myInt;
}
@property (assign) NSInteger myInt;
@end

@implementation MyClass
    @synthesize myInt=__myInt;
@end

The above code, for all intents and purposes, is causing the following methods to be automatically generated at compile time:

-(NSInteger) myInt
{
    return self->__myInt;
}
-(void) setmyInt:(NSInteger)val_
{
    self->__myInt = val_;
}

Of course, what happens "in the background" when Xcode compiles your program is a bit different and more nuanced, but this is basically what happens.

2) I'm not entirely clear what you mean by this one... You always need to alloc and init your variables, regardless of accessor synthesis.

3) No. Properties/synthesis are only needed for a) convenience, be it syntactic or atomicity for multithreading, and b) external access to members inside your class.

EDIT:
To clarify on multithreading and properties, declaring a property nonatomic does a great deal for thread safety. This, and my response to #3, addresses your last concern in your question.

share|improve this answer

You can do this:

 @interface MyClass : NSObject
 @property (retain, nonatomic) IBOutlet UIImageView *image;
 @end

 @implementation MyClass
 @synthesize image;
 @end

Does the @prototype duplicate or replace my original definition, or does it merely set up the mutibility and atomicity of the original?

The property adds things on-top of the ivar like KVO and thread safety if it's atomic.

Does @synthesise remove my need to use image = [UIImageView alloc]?

No

If I do not provide an @property and still go ahead creating and destroying my variable manually, does that make any difference?

If you don't make a property you lose out on the things a property gets you like KVO, it's a judgment and api call on how the variable will be used. Under arc it is much easier to use straight up ivars because you don't have to replicate the retaining and releasing the property did automatically.

share|improve this answer

The 'image' in @property (retain, nonatomic) UIImageView *image line is just a name of the property and IBOutlet UIImageView *image; is an ivar which you access through self.image. I always name an ivar for property the same as the name but add _ :

UIImage * image_;
@property (retain, nonatomic) UIImageView *image;
@synthesize image = image_;

If you will not create an ivar for your property the Xcode do it automatically for you (the name of the ivar will be the same as the name of property)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.