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interface IExecutor
{
   void Execute();
}

class Executor2<T> where T : IExecutor
{
    public void Execute()
    {
        var ex = (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T));
        ex.Execute();
    }
}

It was a question at an interview. They told me that sometimes this code falls (causes exceptions) and there are at least 3 reasons that could cause the problems. It's unknown what exceptions were there. But the method Execute was created good, its implementation has no fault.

Does anybody have a suggestion about that?

Edit: There are at least 3 reasons that could cause the problems. What are these reasons?

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Is the question what 3 faults could have occurred? –  Adam Houldsworth Apr 13 '12 at 8:20
    
There are at least 3 reasons that could cause the problems. What are these reasons? –  Alexandre Apr 13 '12 at 8:43
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

On the face of it I can see a few issues.

  1. The code doesn't compile, but I can ignore that and make it compile.
  2. The code doesn't do what you think it does.

To explain 2: you specify a type T at the class definition with a constraint on IExecutor, but you then define another type T at the method level without a constraint. This doesn't compile.

If I fix this and remove the <T> definition from the method I can see a number of reasons for it failing without much warning:

  1. ex is null.
  2. Type T doesn't have a public parameterless constructor defined.
  3. Perhaps it cannot load the DLL containing T.

As spotted by Jakub:

  1. T could be an interface (no constructor).
  2. T could be an abstract class, these don't allow instances to be created directly.

The first can be guarded against using a null check if (ex != null) and the second can be guarded against using another generic constraint new():

class Executor2<T> where T : IExecutor, new()
{
}

Obviously you could also amend your code to including exception logging. This might be useful in figuring out what the actual problems are instead of just stabbing in the dark:

public void Execute<T>()
{
    try
    {
        var ex = (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T));
        ex.Execute();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Log(ex); // Mystical logging framework.
        throw;
    }
}

This is the only answer I can cobble together considering I didn't understand the question.

If I were asked this in an interview I'd likely say I couldn't name all 3, but I'd know how to change the code to be more maintainable and tell me what was wrong. Then I'd likely walk for asking pointless interview questions.

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1  
Type T doesn't have a public parameterless constructor defined. exactly! What else? –  Alexandre Apr 13 '12 at 8:40
    
@AlexMaslakov I'm quite confused about this question. Do you already know the answers and are just quizzing people? –  Adam Houldsworth Apr 13 '12 at 8:41
1  
I only knew the answer about parameterless constructor. –  Alexandre Apr 13 '12 at 8:50
    
+1 for the new() constraint. –  Mel Padden Apr 13 '12 at 8:50
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Is it assumed that there is no fault in T's design? By which I mean, if T defines a static constructor which does Bad Stuff, type initialisation for T will fail giving a different exception to that which would occur if it did not have a parameterless constructor.

For that matter, if T defines a parameterless constructor which will fail then it's also broken.

Also, if the type has a private constructor you will get an error. Or if the type inherits from a type which will cause a TypeInitialisationException

[Edit]

Try this:

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            try { 
                new Executor2<IExecutor>().Execute();
            }
            catch { Console.WriteLine("Failed IExecutor"); }

            try { new Executor2<AbstractExecutorWithImpl>().Execute(); }
            catch { Console.WriteLine("Failed AbstractExecutorWithImpl"); }

            try { new Executor2<AbstractExecutorWithNoImpl>().Execute(); }
            catch { Console.WriteLine("Failed AbstractExecutorWithNoImpl"); }

            try { new Executor2<ConcreteExecutor>().Execute(); }
            catch { Console.WriteLine("Failed ConcreteExecutor"); }

            try { new Executor2<DerivedExecutor>().Execute(); }
            catch { Console.WriteLine("Failed DerivedExecutor"); }

            try { new Executor2<DerivedExecutorWithBadConstr>().Execute(); }
            catch { Console.WriteLine("Failed DerivedExecutorWithBadConstr"); }

            try { new Executor2<DerivedExecutorWithPrivateConstr>().Execute(); }
            catch { Console.WriteLine("Failed DerivedExecutorWithPrivateConstr"); }

            try { new Executor2<DerivedExecutorWithPublicBadConstr>().Execute(); }
            catch { Console.WriteLine("Failed DerivedExecutorWithPublicBadConstr"); }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }


    interface IExecutor
    {
        void Execute();
    }

    abstract class AbstractExecutorWithImpl : IExecutor
    {
        public void Execute()
        {
            Console.Write("Executing AbstractExecutorWithImpl ");
        }
    }
    abstract class AbstractExecutorWithNoImpl : IExecutor
    {
        public abstract void Execute();
    }

    class ConcreteExecutor : IExecutor
    {
        public void Execute()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Executing ConcreteExecutor");
        }
    }

    class DerivedExecutor : AbstractExecutorWithNoImpl
    {
        public override void Execute()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Executing DerivedExecutor");
        }
    }

    class DerivedExecutorWithBadConstr : IExecutor
    {
        static DerivedExecutorWithBadConstr() { throw new Exception("Static initialisation Exception"); }
        public void Execute()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Executing DerivedExecutorWithBadConstr");
        }
    }

    class DerivedExecutorWithPrivateConstr : DerivedExecutor
    {
        private DerivedExecutorWithPrivateConstr() { }
    }
    class DerivedExecutorWithPublicBadConstr : DerivedExecutorWithBadConstr
    {
        public DerivedExecutorWithPublicBadConstr() : base() { }
    }

    class Executor2<T> where T : IExecutor
    {
        public void Execute()
        {
            var ex = (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T));
            ex.Execute();
        }
    }
}
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T may be an interface or abstract class - and you cannot create instances of them, or T doesn't have a parameterless constructor.

Also, var ex = (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T)); could be rewritten as var ex = Activator.CreateInstance<T>();

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Didn't consider the interface or abstract class part, although when I think about it, the former is sort of covered when you assume a public parameterless constructor. –  Adam Houldsworth Apr 13 '12 at 8:53
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