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If we return pointers from functions, we can write either

const X* f();

or

X* const f();

,in this way controlling whether the pointer can be reassigned or if the class can be modified internally. But when returning references, these two seems to have the same meaning:

const X& f();
X& const f();

It seems impossible to return a reference where you can modify X, but not re-assign it? And if it is indeed impossible, why should we ever return references when pointers seem potent in this area?

UPDATE: As been pointed out, references cannot be reassigned. However this makes me even more bewildered, as the following code prints 33 55, not 33 33 as I would expect. How does that match with that references cannot be reassigned?

struct X
{
   X(int i_) { i = i_;} 
   int i;
};

struct Y
{
    X& get2() {tmp2 = new X(55); return *tmp2;} 
    X& get() {tmp = new X(33); return *tmp;}    
    void print () {cout << tmp->i << endl;}
    X* tmp;
    X* tmp2;
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Y y;    
    X& tmp2 = y.get2();
    X& tmp = y.get();       
    y.print();
    tmp = tmp2;
    y.print();
    return 0;
} 
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X& const f(); is nonsense see: parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/const-correctness.html –  EdChum Apr 13 '12 at 8:40
    
Why do you expect "33 33", you've assigned tmp2 to tmp? –  Charles Bailey Apr 13 '12 at 9:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It seems impossible to return a reference where you can modify X, but not re-assign it?

References can never be re-assigned. They keep referring the same referent to which they are bound at initialization.

why should we ever return references when pointers seem potent in this area?

Reference usage is more intuitive, the caller of functions can use references simply like variables unlike pointers where the user has to deal with the dereferencing etc.

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4  
Another good reason for returning references over pointers is that it will point to a valid object/function since null references are not allowed (in sensible C++). Hence calling code does not have to handle a NULL case and you avoid problems like dereferencing a NULL pointer. Of course, if your calling code knows a-priori that the function will never return a NULL pointer, it doesn't need to worry about the NULL case, however, using a reference instead "documents" this guarantee explicitly. –  Preet Kukreti Apr 13 '12 at 8:30
    
@PreetKukreti: Yes, thats true indeed. –  Alok Save Apr 13 '12 at 8:37
    
Ok, I updated my question with what I wouldnt excpect if references were non-reassignable –  Frank Apr 13 '12 at 8:46
    
@PreetKukreti: Well sure null wont be returned true, but still what the reference points at could be destroyed at a later occasion, so some sort of checking is normally still needed, right? If you return a pointer, checking if it is null is a good way to know if the object is still valid, in my opinion. –  Frank Apr 13 '12 at 9:12
1  
@Frank yes! the entire point is that you might then have one of two versions: X* getSomeInternal() which can return an uninitialised pointer, or X& getSomeInternal() which guarantees that the returned value is valid. The idea is to define your interface based on what postconditions your functions can guarantee. If your function might not be able to always return a valid resource, return a pointer (with NULL signalling it is invalid). Else use a reference. Its a way of documenting your code and avoiding ambiguity; it provides semantic value much the same way as good variable naming does. –  Preet Kukreti Apr 13 '12 at 11:07

Your first two examples are NOT the same. You probably meant

const X* f();
X const* f();

and you can in fact write the same with references:

const X& f();
X const& f();

The declaration X* const f(); doesn't make a lot of sense. You can't change the returned pointer anyway. It's just a value. You can either use the value (i.e. f()->foo()) or store it (i.e. X* copy = f();). And if you store the value, then the const-ness depends only on the variable in which you stored the value, not the value itself. Compare int x = 4; - x doesn't become const just because 4 is a constant.

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Re the update question: When you do tmp = tmp2; in the main function, you are not assigning the reference to tmp2 to tmp. Rather, you are copying the whole object.

To see this, give X copy constructor that prints something. Something like this should work:

X(X& that)
{
    std::cout << "X is being copied" << std::endl;
    *this = that;
}
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Thanx I finally got what was happening. I should have printed the pointer values instead, then it would have been obvious :) –  Frank Apr 13 '12 at 9:03

It seems impossible to return a reference where you can modify X, but not re-assign it?

Indeed. A reference is an alias for a variable, and cannot be reseated (ie, be changed to alias another variable).

And if it is indeed impossible, why should we ever return references when pointers seem potent in this area?

It is less a matter of potency and more a matter of semantics, and responsibility.

A pointer:

  • may be null
  • may mean that you need to take ownership of the object (ie, it was created by new and you have to dispose of it)

A reference has none of those issues, so it is simpler. And simplicity is good. So when you do not need the power of a pointer, spare yourself its woes and use a reference.

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