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# coding: utf-8

def func():
    print 'x is', x
    #x = 2   #if I add this line, there will be an error, why?
    print 'Changed local x to', x
x = 50
func()
print 'Value of x is', x 
  1. I don't add the global x in func function, but it can still find x is 50, why?
  2. When I add the x=2 line in the func function, there will be an error (UnboundLocalError: local variable 'x' referenced before assignment), why?
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What is the error? –  Marcin Apr 13 '12 at 10:11
    
@Marcin if I add the x = 2, the error is "UnboundLocalError: local variable 'x' referenced before assignment" –  Tanky Woo Apr 13 '12 at 10:14
    
Then put that in your question. –  Marcin Apr 13 '12 at 10:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The trick here is that local names are detected statically:

  • As long as the name x is not assigned in the function, references to x resolve to the the global scope
  • If the name x is assigned anywhere in the function, Python assumes that x is thus a local name everywhere in the function. As a consequence, the first line becomes an error because local name x is used before being assigned.

In other words: assigned name is treated as local everywhere in the function, not just after the point of assignment.

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The global keyword is required only to write to globals.

There is an error because assigning to a variable which is not declared global creates a local variable of that name. You refer to x in that scope before it is assigned to, so you are attempting to read a local variable which has not yet been assigned.

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1  
Downvoter: What do you consider incorrect? –  Marcin Apr 13 '12 at 10:54

Python uses fairly typical variable scoping. Non-local variables are visible within a function.

You only need global keyword if you want to assign to a variable within global scope. Also you have to note the difference between global and outer scope. Consider implications:

x = 'global'
def f():
    x = 'local in f'
    def g():
        global x 
        x = 'assigned in g'
    g()
    print x

Upon execution of f() above code will print local in f, while x in global scope is set to 'assigned in g'.


As of Python 3, there is also nonlocal keyword, which allows you assigning to variable from outer scope.

x = 'global'
def f():
    x = 'local in f'
    def g():
        nonlocal x 
        x = 'assigned in g'
    return g
    print(x)

Upon execution of f() above code will print 'assigned in g(which is the value ofxin local scope off()), while value ofx` in global scope remains untouched.

It's also worth to note, that Python uses lexical (static) scoping, thus following code does not modify the x in the global scope:

x = 'global'
def f():
    x = 'local in f'
    def g():
        nonlocal x 
        x = 'assigned in g'
    return g
g = f()
g()
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1  
If you want to discuss the technical merits of something, do it constructively and maturely. Don't get into kiddish name-calling and fighting. Thanks. –  BoltClock Apr 13 '12 at 11:55
    
@BoltClock'saUnicorn I don't see the disrespect you mention on this answer. oh..wait (checks English dictionary for typical ) ah .. tehre it is - it looks like this word has a negative cognation in English it does not get in other languages - Vartec, being a non-native speaker probably was not aware of that. """ 1. being or serving as a representative example of a particular type; characteristic the painting is a typical Rembrandt 2. considered to be an example of some undesirable trait that is typical of you!"""}(collins dict) - around the World, the first meaning is more spread) –  jsbueno Apr 13 '12 at 13:17
    
(I edited the answer to remove the offending word) –  jsbueno Apr 13 '12 at 13:18
    
@jsbueno: Well, it wasn't really an issue with the answer... it was something else. –  BoltClock Apr 13 '12 at 13:20

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