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I have several classes (A, B, C, ...) that all use a List<AnotherClass> to store references to 'other' objects. But 'other' is different for each of the classes A, B, C. So Class A contains List<Class_X> Class B contains List<Class_Y> Class C contains List<Class_Z>

Instead of implementing Add / Delete / Search (etc) functions in A, B, C it seems logical to me to create a class ListRef<T> from List<T>

public class ListRef<T>: List<T>
{
    protected ListRef<T> ListOfObjects = null;
    protected string name = null;

    public ListRef<T>
    {
        ListOfObjects = new ListRef<T>();
    }
}

Using the code above (is this the right code for what I want?) I don't know how I can supply the right class (Class_X, Class_Y, Class_Z) replacing/specifying <T> in the constructor of each class (A, B, C) that will use ListRef.

In the constructor of class A I would like to write something like:

public A() : base<Class_X>
{
}

How can I specify from WITHIN class A what kind of objects need to be stored in ListOfObjects?

I prefer NOT to write

public A()
{
    ListOfObjects = new ListRef<Class_X();
}

as I would like to have ListOfObjects declared private instead of protected


Inside Listref I JUST want to be able to Add, Delete, Search objects. So I'm not actually using those classes (Class_X, Class_Y, Class_Z).

currently I have

public class A
{
     private List<Class_X> ListOfObjects = null;
     A()
     {
         ListOfObjects = new List<Class_X>();
     }

     public void Add(string Name)
     {
        Class_X Object = new Class_X(Name);
        ListOfObjects.Add(Object);
     }
     public void Delete(Class_X Object)
     {
        ListOfObjects.Remove(Object);
     }
}

and the same kind of code for class B (using Class_Y) and for class C (using class_Z). To me it seems logical to use ONE class ListRef to perform the Add and Delete operations and maintain the list for all classes I use. (of course the real code is more complicated)

share|improve this question
1  
Why are you inheriting from List and then using your subclass inside your class? This seems to be quite circular. – Daniel A. White Jun 18 '09 at 17:09
    
It might help if you showed how you are using this class so we get a better understanding of what you're trying to make it do. – CoderDennis Jun 18 '09 at 17:12
    
Inside Listref I JUST want to be able to Add, Delete, Search objects. So I'm not actually using those classes (Class_X, Class_Y, Class_Z). Currently I have public class A { private List<Class_X> ListOfObjects = null; A() { ListOfObjects = new List<Class_X>(); } public void Add(string Name) { Class_X Object = new Class_X(Name); ListOfObjects.Add(Object); } public void Delete(Class_X Object) { ListOfObjects.Remove(Object); } } – SoftwareTester Jun 18 '09 at 17:27
    
hmmm comments are hard to read here if containing code; I will add it to the question – SoftwareTester Jun 18 '09 at 17:29
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understand you question correctly, it sounds like what you want to do is create a group of classes A, B, C, etc.. that each manage a collection of some other type (X, Y, Z) - but you don't want to duplicate some of the list management logic across A, B, and C.

There are two different ways to achieve this.

First, the inheritance approach: you could give A, B, and C a common generic base class that is parameterized on the type of the item each will manage. Here's a code example:

public abstract class ABCBase<T>
{
   protected IList<T> m_List = new List<T>();

   // methods that manage the collection
   // I chose to make the virtual so that derived 
   // classes could alter then behavior - may not be needed
   public virtual void Add( T item )    { ... }
   public virtual void Remove( T item ) { ... }
   public virtual int  Find( T item )   { ... } 
}

public class A : ABCBase<X> { ... }

public class B : ABCBase<Y> { ... }

public class C : ABCBase<Z> { ... }

Second, is the composition approach: create a manager class for your colleciton that implements the operations on the child list, and aggregate that in each of A, B, and C:

public class ListManager<T>
{
   private IList<T> m_List = new List<T>();

   public void Add( T item )    { ... }
   public void Remove( T item ) { ... }
   public int  Find( T item )   { ... }
}

public class A
{
   public ListManager<X> ListOfX { get; protected set; }

   public A() { ListOfX = new ListManager<X>(); }
}

public class B
{
   public ListManager<Y> ListOfX { get; protected set; }

   public B() { ListOfY = new ListManager<Y>(); }
}

public class C
{
   public ListManager<Z> ListOfX { get; protected set; }

   public C() { ListOfX = new ListManager<Z>(); }
}

You could also choose to mix both of these approaches - creating a list management class but also creating base class (or interface) for A, B, C - so that each exposes a consistent property ChildList (or some such) that consumers could use without always having to know the type actual types A, B, C.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you understood my question correctly. I don't want(can) to use the inheritance approach as one of the classes (B) has been derived already and multiple inheritance isn't allowed in C# (of course I can solve that by introducing still another class). The composition approach seems better for me, although I have to use ListOfX.Add(item); instead of just Add(item); Any idea how I can avoid that? – SoftwareTester Jun 18 '09 at 17:44
    
If you just want this for syntactic purposes, define an interface that A, B, and C implement with the Add(), Remove(), Find(), methods etc. And forward the call into the ListManager aggregated instance. It's a little clunky, but I think that's the best you can do if you can't change the inheritance trees for A,B,C. – LBushkin Jun 18 '09 at 17:57
    
Thanks for answers(s) . IMO it is the best (I can't 'vote' yet) and I'm using the composition method now. In fact it also has advantages using public ListManager<X> ListOfX as it makes it more clear what kind of list is maintained and used compared to ListOfObjects. – SoftwareTester Jun 18 '09 at 18:44

Here is how I would recommend doing it...

public class ABC_Base<TChild>
{
    public IEnumberable<TChild> Children { get; set; }

    public void AddChild(TChild item) 
    {
    }

    public void RemoveChild(TChild item)
    {
    }

    //etc
}

public class A : ABC_Base<X> // X is the type for your child
{

}

//Used like so...
A myA = new A();

myA.AddChild(new X());

// or if you are wanting to specify when created then this...

public class A<TChild> : ABC_Base<TChild>
{
}

//Used like so...
A myA = new A<X>();
A myOtherA = new A<Y>();

myA.Addchild(new X());
myOtherA.AddChild(new Y());
share|improve this answer

How about

public interface ISomeOtherClass
{
}

public class Class_X : ISomeOtherClass
{
}

public class Class_Y : ISomeOtherClass
{
}

public class BaseClass<T> where T : ISomeOtherClass
{
   public ListRef<T> OtherObjects { get; set; }
}

public class A : BaseClass<Class_x>
{
}

public class B : BaseClass<Class_Y>
{
}
share|improve this answer

I hope I am correctly understanding your problem. Here is how I would do it:

interface ILetter<T>
{
    IList<T> OtherObjects { get; }
}

class A : ILetter<Class_X> 
{
    public IList<Class_X> OtherObjects
    {
    	get { /* ... */ }
    }
}

class B : ILetter<Class_Y> 
{
    public IList<Class_X> OtherObjects
    {
    	get { /* ... */ }
    }
}

// etc...

With this interface you can be sure that each type has a public IList<T> property that you can use for any operations you wish.

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