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lets say I had a file(.csh)

File Contents

Script_1
{
 code of script1
}

Script_2
{
    code of script2
 }
.
.
.

Script_n
{

 code of script_n

}

Now the thing is if we run like

 ./file.csh -script1 <other arguments>

it should execute only script 1 code Like wise , if we run

./file.csh  -script2 <other arguments>

it should execute only script 2 code

Can any one tell the idea how to accomplish that?

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3  
Why would you want to do this? Files are cheap; put each script in its own file name. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 13 '12 at 10:43
    
Just to help the idea of, rather than carrying multiple scripts. its better to have as a master single script! –  user1228191 Apr 13 '12 at 10:47
    
It makes the scripts slower; all the scripts have to be fully parsed before the one you want to run can be run. Granted, you can use common 'functions' (fragments of script -- does csh have functions like POSIX shells do?). I have hundreds of programs, many of them scripts, in my private $HOME/bin directory (528 entries in total; 12 sub-directories; 132 executables; 384 scripts, therefore). –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 13 '12 at 10:53
2  
People still use csh? –  Sorpigal Apr 13 '12 at 13:26
    
@Sorpigal Which one is the trend now, is perl OK! –  user1228191 Apr 13 '12 at 18:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can grab command line parameters via $n where n is integer > 0 in order of argument passed

#!/bin/csh
if ($#argv < 1) then
    echo "Usage: $0 (-script1|-script2) <args>"
    exit 0
endif

if ($1 == '-script1') then
# run Script_1
else
# run Script_2
endif;

If you'd like to get all arguments except the first one together, you can use shift:

#!/bin/csh

// without argument by default operates on $argv which is all the arguments 
// passed via command line
shift 

echo $argv // now contains all arguments but the first
share|improve this answer
    
Can you shift the arguments so that the -script1 is lost leaving the other arguments to be processed by the sub-script (which is quite different from a subscript, of course). –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 13 '12 at 10:42
    
@JonathanLeffler edited –  SiGanteng Apr 13 '12 at 10:48
    
Dude, it was reporting error "if: Malformed file inquiry." Anything Wrong!! –  user1228191 Apr 13 '12 at 11:16
    
@user1228191 which line and what does the line look like? –  SiGanteng Apr 13 '12 at 11:16
    
i ran with -script1 as argument, why i tried to debug back with -xf , it ends here: if ( 2 < 1 ) then if ( -script1 == -script1 ) then if: Malformed file inquiry. –  user1228191 Apr 13 '12 at 11:18

Here's my solution, Hope it will help.

Using all_script file to store all content. My sample file content is:

Script_1
{
 echo executing script1
 echo 1st arg = $1
 echo 2nd arg = $2
 echo rest arg = $*
}

Script_2
{
 echo script2  
 echo 1st arg = $1
 echo 2nd arg = $2
 echo rest arg = $*

}

Script_3
{
echo script3
 echo 1st arg = $1
 echo 2nd arg = $2
 echo rest arg = $*
}

My script to run this:

#! /bin/csh -f


set script_name = `echo $argv[1] | sed 's/-s/S/g' | sed 's/t/t_/g'`
set script_arg =  "$argv[2-$#argv]"  

#grep the relevent script
grep -A1000 $script_name all_script | grep -B1000 -m1 "}" | sed 's/Script_[0-9]//g' | sed 's/{//g' | sed 's/}//g' > myscript 
csh ./myscript $script_arg

echo "DONE :)"

Change the number 1000 based on maximum length of your script. Also, Please be advised that you have used Script_1 as your script name in file. while you are trying to access it with argument -script1. My script takes care of this, however it would be better to use either one of the format and case should also be uniform... or else you will be inviting un necessary complexity.

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