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I need to write a program that create pipe send filename from command line to child process. In child read that file and send it back using pipe. Parent process should print the file. if error occur in child process error must be send to parent process.

here is my code, it print some junk along file file (and also it disable scrolling in terminal emulator when I run it).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>

void main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
   int pipefd[2];
   char buff[100];
   int childpid;
   int size;
   FILE *file;

   if (argc != 2) {
      printf("usage:\n%s <filename>\n", argv[0]);
      exit(1);
   }
   if (pipe(pipefd) < 0) {
       perror("can't open pipe\n");
   }
   if ((childpid = fork()) == 0) {
      sleep(1);
      size = read(pipefd[0], buff, sizeof(buff));
      file = fopen(buff, "r");
      if (file == NULL) {
         write(pipefd[1], "Can't open file", 15);
         exit(1);
      }
      while (!feof(file)) {
         if (fgets(buff, sizeof(buff), file) == NULL) {
            write(pipefd[1], "Error reading file", 18);
         } else {
            write(pipefd[1], buff, sizeof(buff));
         }
      }
   } else if (childpid > 0) {
      size = strlen(argv[1]);
      if (write(pipefd[1], argv[1], size) != size) {
         perror("Error writing to pipe\n");
      }
      wait(NULL);
      while ((size = read(pipefd[0], buff, sizeof(buff))) > 0) {
         write(1, buff, size);
      }
   }
   exit(0);
}
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It should be int main(int argc, char *argv[]). –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 13 '12 at 10:55
    
Could you tell us what problem are u facing? –  Pavan Manjunath Apr 13 '12 at 10:55
    
If the file is big enough, you have a deadlock; the parent waits for the child to die, but the child may be hung waiting for the parent to read the pipe. You're assuming bi-directional pipes; these are not standard yet (though they're available on Linux, I believe). Your parent process should close the write end of its pipe when it's done writing to it; arguably, the child should close the read end of its pipe when its done reading it. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 13 '12 at 10:59
2  
Your code looks weird : the while(fgets..) { ... } else { ...} part. Don't get it. How can it compile ? It doesn't on my linux box... –  huelbois Apr 13 '12 at 11:02
    
Sorry I updated the code, there was while (!feof(file)) { if but I wanted to shrink the code. I compile when I made this changes but I forget to save the file, I din't notice that. –  jcubic Apr 13 '12 at 21:19
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your program works as intended after quite a few changes. Lets list out what all changes are required and why-

I) Both in the child and parent, close the respective pipes as soon as you are done with them. From man page of read(3),

If some process has the pipe open for writing and O_NONBLOCK is clear, read() shall block the calling thread until some data is written or the pipe is closed by all processes that had the pipe open for writing.

So do something like this in your code everywhere where the job pipes is over,

  size = read(pipefd[0], buff, sizeof(buff));
  close(pipefd[0]);

  write(pipefd[1], buff, strlen(buff));
  close(pipefd[1]);

  if (write(pipefd[1], argv[1], size) != size) {
     perror("Error writing to pipe\n");
  }
  close(pipefd[1]);

  while ((size = read(pipefd[0], buff, sizeof(buff))) > 0) 
  {
     write(1, buff, size);
  }
  close(pipefd[0]);

You hadn't closed the write end of of the pipe in the child and your parent was blocking in the read

II) You are using something like while(fgets(...)) in a loop to read data from file. This will bomb when there are newlines in the file and fgets returns multiple times, overwriting the buffer everytime during the process

I always use simple fgetc and feof combination to read from file. So, change your file reading mechanism to something like

unsigned count=0;
while (!feof(file) && count < sizeof(buff))
    buff[count++]=fgetc(file);
if (feof(file)) 
    buff[--count]=0;
else
    buff[sizeof(buff)-1]=0;

III) While writing the file data from the child, you should use strlen(as we have already made sure buffer is null terminated, see above ) and not sizeof as the buffer may not be full at all and you will end up writing junk. So, change

  write(pipefd[1], buff, sizeof(buff));

to

  write(pipefd[1], buff, strlen(buff));

IV) Follow a safe exit from the child and parent after their job is done. Something like

close(pipefd[1]);
_exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);   // in child

and

close(pipefd[0]);
exit(EXIT_SUCCESS); // in parent

PS: I've changed the file reading logic, so your compiler error is gone now and do follow the advice given by n.m.

share|improve this answer
    
And probably use two pipes. In the current code, both parent and child read and write to the same pipe. –  JeremyP Apr 13 '12 at 13:03
    
Nice suggestion @JeremyP. Though it doesn't affect in this current example, its a good thing to do! –  Pavan Manjunath Apr 13 '12 at 14:27
    
Be wary of using feof() in the main loop logic. The only time you normally use feof() is in error handling code which needs to distinguish between EOF and file read/write error after getting a problem indication from a function such as fgets(). Anything else is somewhat dubious. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 13 '12 at 21:05
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You cannot write sizeof(buf) meaningful bytes if fgets returned less than that. The rest will be filled with junk.

Moreover, mixing string-oriented fgets with binary read/write is a bad style. Use read or fread to read the file. They return number of bytes read, use this number as an argument to write.

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This code does not compile:

  while (fgets(buff, sizeof(buff), file) != NULL) {
        write(pipefd[1], "Error reading file", 18);
     } else {
        write(pipefd[1], buff, sizeof(buff));
     }

You can't have an else clause there.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I have if statement but I remove it. –  jcubic Apr 13 '12 at 20:43
    
@jcubic: It's hard enough debugging other people's code; it is much harder to debug something that isn't the code that they are running. Learn how to reduce your code to a minimal test case that demonstrates your problem and can be pasted into the question. It should be as short as possible (but no shorter); a goal should 20-50 lines, with shorter being better and longer being OK if necessary, but if it gets longer than about 100 lines, you probably haven't minimized it enough. Can any line or declaration be removed? –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 13 '12 at 21:03
    
Sorry I just updated the code. I thought that this code is small enogh to put it without shrinking. And I also thought that this kind of code will be trivial to someone that know C and Linux. –  jcubic Apr 13 '12 at 21:17
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