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I have the following code:

loadOpportunities: function () {
    return $.getJSON("/Opportunity/GetAll").pipe(function (result) {
        //do stuff
    });
},

loadTypes: function () {
    return $.getJSON("/OpportunityTypes/GetAll", null, function (result) {
      //do stuff
    });
},

loadView: function () {
    var self = this;
    var deferred = $.Deferred();
    if (!self.viewLoaded) {
        imp2.mainViewModel.loading(true);
        deferred.pipe($.get('/Opportunities/Opportunity/GetView')
        .done(function (data) {
            $('div#opportunity').html(data);
        }));
        deferred.pipe(self.loadTypes);
        deferred.pipe(self.loadOpportunities)
        .done(function () {
            imp2.mainViewModel.loading(false);
        });
    }
    return deferred.resolve();
},

I want to do something when loadView has finished completely, including all callbacks. In other words: I want to execute some code when the GetView ajax call, the loadTypes function and the loadOpportunities function including their callbacks are all done.

The following then callback function fires when not all is completed. How can I do this?

self.loadView.then(function () {
    //Do something after ALL stuff, including all callbacks is done in loadView
});
share|improve this question
    
One possible solution: in each callback, have it trigger an event, This event will call your final function, but only run the function when all three events have triggered. –  tkone Apr 13 '12 at 11:50
    
i wouldn't return deffered.resolve(); –  Daniel A. White Apr 13 '12 at 12:33
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I sense there may be a little confusion on the use of deferred, promises, and pipes here.

I think what you want is something like this (http://jsfiddle.net/JohnMunsch/ghdgD/):

var testObject = {
  loadOpportunities: function () {
    // This is basically saying that we're getting something via AJAX, but we want to take a swipe at changing it
    // before anyone else gets it, so by using pipe we're returning a different promise than the AJAX promise and
    // the value returned from that is what we want others to get.
    return $.ajax({
        url: "/echo/json/",
        data: opportunities,
        type: "POST"
      }).pipe(
        function (result) {
          console.log("[1]", result);

          // Change the result in some way and then return the changed result. Otherwise there's no point in using
          // a pipe() here, a done() would work as well.
          result.opportunities[0].name = "meat packer";

          return result;
        }
      );      
  },

  loadTypes: function () {
    // This example is different from loadOpportunities in that it isn't using a pipe() so what is returned from
    // this function is the same promise that $.ajax() gave us. Any call to .done() just echos back the same
    // promise you gave it.
    return $.ajax({
        url : "/echo/json/",
        data : opportunityTypes,
        type : "POST"
      }).done(
        function (result) {
          console.log("[1]", result);

          // We can do something with the data received here, but outside of this function, anything that tied to
          // the promise from the $.ajax() will see the original data, not any changes we might make here.                    
        }
      );
  },

  loadView: function () {
    // The self = this, scope = this, etc. that you see at the start of functions is only necessary if there are
    // closures below where this might be something else. This code doesn't have that so this line is unneeded.
    //
    // Be careful about cargo-cult programming and just doing something because you do it everywhere else or you
    // see someone else do something. Try to understand why it's there.
    // var self = this;

    if (!this.viewLoaded) {
      console.log("loading");
      var viewPromise = $.ajax({
          url : "/echo/json/",
          data : view,
          type : "POST"
      }).done(
        function (result) {
          console.log("[1]", result);

          // We might take this and dump it in a <div> somewhere.
        }
      );

      var typesPromise = this.loadTypes();
      var opportunitiesPromise = this.loadOpportunities();

      // The following line hands back a single promise (that's what $.when() does) that wraps all three of the
      // other promises and only fires when all three have completed OR when any one of them has failed.
      return $.when(typesPromise, opportunitiesPromise, viewPromise).done(
        function () {
          // Here I've tied a function to the promise as soon as I've created it. But since I'm handing back the
          // promise, I can also tie functions to it later as well, even after the promise has resolved or been
          // rejected.
          console.log("[2]", "All done loading types, views, and opportunities");
        }
      );
    }

    return true;
  }
};

// Note: Unlike with all the steps labeled [1], I don't believe there is a formal ordering for the
// .done()'s attached to the same promise like both [2] and [3]. So it may be possible for those two steps to
// happen [2]/[3] or [3]/[2] although they always happened [2]/[3] in my testing.
$.when(testObject.loadView()).done(
  function () {
    console.log("[3]", "This will only trigger after all the steps in load view have completed.");
  }
);

Note: I changed the style of your AJAX calls but that was just because I needed to build a working example in jsFiddle. Click on the link above to see this in action over there. It works and it orders things as you expect. You probably don't need pipe as much as you think unless you plan to manipulate the AJAX results before anyone tied to the promise sees the results. Otherwise, .done(), .fail(), and .when() will handle most situations.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a bundle. Indeed there was some confusion. An additional question: When the this.viewLoaded is true in the loadView function it won't work. How do I resolve that? –  RolandG Apr 13 '12 at 18:39
    
Actually, my code handles that without any problems and here's why... $.when() is smart, so if you hand it a promise or a set of them, it returns one promise that is tied to all of them. However, if you hand it something that isn't a promise it immediately creates a new Deferred object and resolves it using the value that it got instead of a promise. So when you call testObject.loadView() and it simply returns "true" then the $.when() just completes immediately and it will perform [3]. You can try it for yourself just by putting a "this.viewLoaded = true" up at the top of the loadView(). –  John Munsch Apr 13 '12 at 19:21
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