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i've found an awesome interpretation for using the APNS with cocoa. APNS Pusher Now i don't want to select my SecIdentityRef everytime (because i'm lazy) i tried putting the SecIdentityRef into NSData and save it to the defaults. next time the app starts i'm loading it again, it always gets exc_bad_access. here's the code i've added:

// For saving
NSData *secRefData = [NSData dataWithBytes:[SFChooseIdentityPanel sharedChooseIdentityPanel].identity length:sizeof([SFChooseIdentityPanel sharedChooseIdentityPanel].identity)];
[[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] setValue:secRefData forKey:@"identity"];

//For loading
NSData *secRefData = [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] valueForKey:@"identity"];
if([secRefData length] != 0) {
     [[APNS sharedAPNS] setIdentity:(SecIdentityRef)CFRetain([secRefData bytes])];
}

How can i get this to work? Is there another way i should store the identity?

Edit

So i've found a solution by saving the Name of the Identity and when starting the app it looks which of the available identities has this name and uses the one with the right name. Here's the code:

//For loading
    NSString *lastIdentityName = [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] valueForKey:@"identityName"];
    if([lastIdentityName length] != 0) {
        NSArray *allIdentities = [self identities];
        for (id object in allIdentities) {
            NSString *theName = [[[X509Certificate extractCertDictFromIdentity:(SecIdentityRef)object] valueForKey:@"Subject"] objectForKey:@"CommonName"];
            if([theName isEqualToString:lastIdentityName]) {
                [[APNS sharedAPNS] setIdentity:(SecIdentityRef)CFRetain((__bridge_retained SecIdentityRef)object)];
                [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] setValue:[self identityName] forKey:@"identityName"];
                // KVO trigger
                [self willChangeValueForKey:@"identityName"];
                [self didChangeValueForKey:@"identityName"];
            }
        }
    }

//For saving
    [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] setValue:[self identityName] forKey:@"identityName"];
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2 Answers 2

This is all messed up. A SecIdentityRef is an opaque reference to an internal object. You're treating it as though it were the pointer to that object, but it could just be an index into a table or whatever.

Second, you don't know the size of the internal object. Your sizeof expression is yielding the size of the pointer, not the object it refers to. There's no way to get the actual size because the type is opaque.

Lastly, there's no reason to believe the object is "scalar" data that be written to file and then read out and be intact. Quite possibly, the object contains internal pointers which don't make sense in another process's address space. Not to mention the fact that you haven't saved and restored whatever those pointers might point to.

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Many thanks. but how can i store the selected identity properly? –  tommynator128 Apr 13 '12 at 12:09
    
I'm not sure. I see that there's SecIdentityCopyCertificate() and SecCertificateCopyData(), then in the other direction SecCertificateCreateWithData() and SecIdentityCreateWithCertificate(). However, I'm not deeply familiar with this stuff and I'm not sure if you'd breach security by saving a certificate's data to user defaults. The docs for SecIdentityCopyCertificate() also say the output can be cast to a SecKeychainItemRef and I see SecKeychainItemCreatePersistentReference(), which looks promising. Then, in reverse, SecKeychainItemCopyFromPersistentReference(). –  Ken Thomases Apr 13 '12 at 12:40

Use SecKeychainItemCreatePersistentReference() and SecKeychainItemCopyFromPersistentReference() -- they can be passed between processes or persisted. There are some caveats, though:

  1. You cannot persist an identity, only a certificate, so you have to go through extra hops to convert between the two.
  2. You'll get NSData with long and opaque data chunk, so you must store it as such, not e.g. as a string; and forget about being able to edit this setting manually.

That's how I do it in my PDF-signing app and so far it works flawlessly. Here are relevant parts of the code:

- (NSData*) identityToPersistent:(SecIdentityRef)ident
{
    OSStatus status;
    SecCertificateRef cert;
    CFDataRef data = nil;

    status = SecIdentityCopyCertificate(ident, &cert);
    if (status != noErr)
        return nil;
    status = SecKeychainItemCreatePersistentReference((SecKeychainItemRef)cert, &data);
    CFRelease(cert);
    if (status != noErr)
        return nil;

    return CFBridgingRelease(data);
}

- (SecIdentityRef) identityFromPersistent:(NSData*)data
{
    OSStatus status;
    SecKeychainItemRef cert;
    SecIdentityRef ident = nil;

    status = SecKeychainItemCopyFromPersistentReference((__bridge CFDataRef)data, &cert);
    if (status != noErr)
        return nil;
    status = SecIdentityCreateWithCertificate(NULL, (SecCertificateRef)cert, &ident);
    CFRelease(cert);

    return ident;
}


- (SecIdentityRef) getPreferredIdentity
{
    NSData *data = [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] dataForKey:@"SigningIdentity"];
    if (!data)
        return nil;
    return [self identityFromPersistent:data];
}

- (void) setPreferredIdentity:(SecIdentityRef)ident
{
    NSData *data = [self identityToPersistent:ident];
    [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] setObject:data forKey:@"SigningIdentity"];
}
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