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Objects in my open-source toolkit are all based on the class AbstractObject. I want to add a function into AbstractObject which will create and return object of the exact same class.

This is different from cloning, because the property values are not copied. I thought about calling it duplicate but it is confusing when working with ActiveRecord classes (as duplicate would be used to duplicate record, not object).

form2 = form1->createObjectWithSameClass()

Please suggest a single-word (preferably) name for this. I appreciate your time!

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Is the new object related to the one on which the method is called in any way besides sharing its type? –  larsmans Apr 13 '12 at 12:10
    
they share same parent in object run-time tree. (like a dom tree) other than that - no. –  romaninsh Apr 13 '12 at 13:33
    
make_sibling? –  larsmans Apr 13 '12 at 14:29
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on the information here, this sounds like you want another plain object of the same type as a variable in scope, and that type is the only context needed when creating the object.

In that case, this sounds like a valid case for a Factory instead of a method hanging off of an instance. You could do, perhaps:

myFactory.create(form1)

or

myFactory.create(form1.getClass())

EDIT: this is not a direct answer to your question, but because you are concerned with naming, and therefore I assume with clarity of code, one of the big benefits of a pattern is clarity (everyone knows what a Factory is, so they won't be confused by whatever name you end up choosing).

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thanks. im looking forward to some alternatives. –  romaninsh Apr 13 '12 at 13:34
    
Ok, using existing convention as my muse, you should call the method newInstance(), simply because newInstance() is the same name as Class.newInstance(). If a reader of your code understands the behavior of Class.newInstance(), then I hope they think your own newInstance() method does the same thing. –  sethcall Apr 13 '12 at 15:29
    
Awesome. That is the perfect name. Thanks a lot. –  romaninsh Apr 15 '12 at 0:09
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