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I have an array e.g. string[] ccsplit.

I want to add all of these into a string, so I use stringbuilder:

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
foreach (string str in ccsplit)
{
    builder.Append(str);
}

But the only problem is that I don't want the string ccsplit[0] to be added to the stringbuilder, how could I achieve this?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can start the index at 1 all the time and append it to stringbuilder.

for(int i=1; i<lengthOfArray;i++)
{
    //Do your stuff.
}
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Thank you, that is just what I was looking for :) –  user1326461 Apr 13 '12 at 12:31

There's not even a need to use a StringBuilder or a loop.

 string result = String.Concat(ccsplit.Skip(1));

Will do the job. You do need Fx 4 or later.

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One Line Answer

string str = string.Join("", ccsplit.Skip(1).ToArray());
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If you can use Linq, you could use the Skip extension method:

foreach (string str in ccsplit.Skip(1)) 
{
    builder.Append(str);
}

or, without Linq:

for (int i = 1; i < ccsplit.Length; i++) {
    builder.Append(ccsplit[i]);
}
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You can use Skip() http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb358985.aspx

 StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (string str in ccsplit.Skip(1))
        {
            builder.Append(str);
        }
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This is how you could do it without LINQ.

for (var i = 1; i < ccsplit.Length; i++){
    builder.Append(ccsplit[i]);
}
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You could also use LINQ to concat all strings:

String result = ccsplit.Skip(1).Aggregate((s1, s2) => s1 + s2);

Edit: Here's a version that uses StringBuilder:

String result = ccsplit.Skip(1).Aggregate(new StringBuilder(),
                (sb, str) => sb.Append(str),
                (sb) => sb.ToString());

Enumerable.Aggregate

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1  
Using LINQ for that is like using a cannon to shoot flies :P KISS –  SiliconMind Apr 13 '12 at 12:37
    
What reason to use here Aggregate, if we can just Join or Concat? Also, no reason to use StringBuilder here, Concat is already optimized for full-length result string. –  Harm Apr 13 '12 at 12:42
    
@Harm: String.Concat is only optimized(using a StringBuilder internally) if you're not concatenating in a loop. Ok, i've missed the simple String.Join :) –  Tim Schmelter Apr 13 '12 at 12:48

using System.Linq;

...

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(); 
foreach (string str in ccsplit.Skip(1)) 
{ 
    builder.Append(str); 
} 
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You probably need a string in the end, so just use appropriate string.Join overload instead of StringBuilder and a loop:

string combined = string.Join(string.Empty, ccsplit, 1, ccsplit.Length - 1);
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Use for loop :

  StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    for(int i = 1; i < ccsplit.Length; i++)
    {
         builder.Append(ccsplit[i]);
    }
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You can do it like this:

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(); 
for (int ccsplitIndex = 1; ccsplitIndex < ccsplit.Length; ccsplitIndex++) 
{ 
    builder.Append(ccsplit[ccsplitIndex]); 
} 
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Change the foreach by a for starting the index at 1 instead of 0

for (int i = 1; i <= ccsplit.Length-1; i++)
{
   builder.Append(ccsplit[i]);
}
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