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Sure enough there are more than a way to convert the following strings either form left to right or vice versa

"content-management-systems" <=> "Content Management Systems"

What's the ruby way here ?

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erm sorry can you rephrase the question it simply doesn't make sense –  krystan honour Apr 13 '12 at 12:41
    
Given the string "content-management-systems" how do you get "Content Management Systems" string with Ruby ? Then given "Content Management Systems" how do you get "content-management-systems" ? –  Luca G. Soave Apr 13 '12 at 12:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is tricky one:

puts "content-management-systems".split("-").map(&:capitalize).join(" ").
     tap{ |str| puts str}.
     split.map(&:downcase).join("-")

#=> Content Management Systems
#=> content-management-systems

The simplified variant:

"content-management-systems".split("-").map(&:capitalize).join(" ") 
#=> Content Management Systems

"Content Management Systems".split.map(&:downcase).join("-")
#=> content-management-systems

The clean variant (from Micheal):

"content-management-systems".split("-").map(&:capitalize).join(" ").
split(" ").map(&:downcase).join("-")
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2  
And the complete round-trip: "content-management-systems".split("-").map(&:capitalize).join(" ").split(" ").map(&:downcase).join("-") –  Michael Berkowski Apr 13 '12 at 12:56
    
Wow! That's great, you rocks! –  Luca G. Soave Apr 13 '12 at 12:57
    
@Micheal, you're right, but you can't see the results –  megas Apr 13 '12 at 12:58
    
@megas Was only a joke. –  Michael Berkowski Apr 13 '12 at 13:00
    
vice versa yeah :-) –  Luca G. Soave Apr 13 '12 at 13:20

gsub regexp matches can be manipulated in block mode.

"content-management-systems".
  gsub(/(\w+)(-)?/) { ($2 ? $1 + " " : $1).capitalize! }.
  gsub(/(\w+)(\s)?/) { ($2 ? $1 + "-" : $1).downcase! }

and as these benchmark shows not much difference between regexp and noregexp versions.

require 'benchmark'

STR = "content-management-systems".freeze

Benchmark.bmbm(10) do |x|
  x.report("noregexp") {
    STR.split("-").map(&:capitalize).join(" ").
    split(" ").map(&:downcase).join("-")
  }

  x.report("rgexp") {
    STR.
    gsub(/(\w+)(-)?/) { ($2 ? $1 + " " : $1).capitalize! }.
    gsub(/(\w+)(\s)?/) { ($2 ? $1 + "-" : $1).downcase! }
  }
end

__END__

Rehearsal ----------------------------------------------
noregexp     0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000032)
rgexp        0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000035)
------------------------------------- total: 0.000000sec

                 user     system      total        real
noregexp     0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000051)
rgexp        0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000058)
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I appreciate regexp, ... but see my answer ... –  Luca G. Soave Apr 13 '12 at 13:26
    
@LucaG.Soave I know, added only to show another way. –  Selman Ulug Apr 13 '12 at 13:31
    
yeah, regex was missing here, thank you. –  Luca G. Soave Apr 13 '12 at 13:38

I post this just to remember that ... regex just double computation time :

1.9.2p290 :014 > time = Benchmark.measure do
1.9.2p290 :015 >     puts "content-management-systems".split("-").map(&:capitalize).join(" ").
1.9.2p290 :016 >          tap{ |str| puts str}.
1.9.2p290 :017 >          split.map(&:downcase).join("-")
1.9.2p290 :018?>   end
Content Management Systems
content-management-systems
 =>   0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000077)

1.9.2p290 :019 > time = Benchmark.measure do
1.9.2p290 :020 >     "content-management-systems".gsub(/(\w+)(-)?/) { ($2 ? $1 + " " : $1).capitalize! }
1.9.2p290 :021?>   "Content Management Systems".gsub(/(\w+)(\s)?/) { ($2 ? $1 + "-" : $1).downcase! }
1.9.2p290 :022?>   end
 =>   0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000164)

and I'd like to thanks all contribution :-)

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1  
Thanks for the data! Regexp is never as fast as manual manipulation, but it is pretty fancy... and maybe faster in coding if you know regexp well –  texasbruce Apr 13 '12 at 13:31
    
@Luca G. Soave, In this case you don't need to use 'tap{ |str| puts str}' –  megas Apr 13 '12 at 13:36
    
@megas correct, in that case is even a bit faster (0.000010 less) –  Luca G. Soave Apr 13 '12 at 13:50

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