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As title said:

I have form with 2 trackbars. One for frequency and one for amplitude. I set up timer for on-the-fly changing.

private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        float amplitude, frequency;

        amplitude = Convert.ToSingle(trackBar1.Value) / 100;
        label1.Text = amplitude.ToString() + " V";

        frequency = trackBar2.Value;
        label2.Text = frequency.ToString() + " Hz";
    }

I have also 4 radio-buttons to decide, which type of signal will be displayed (sine, square, triangle, sawthoot)

Now I have this implemented with ImageList (change image of signal).

How can I draw type of signal and regulate it with with trackbars? So it will be like in osciloscope.

Thanks for your answers and code.

share|improve this question
    
Are you asking for the formula to plot a line or how to actually put the line on your form? – carny666 Apr 13 '12 at 12:56
1  
What is this timer thing? Why don't you listen on the TrackBar.ValueChanged event? – Nicolas Repiquet Apr 13 '12 at 13:01
1  
@Nicolas: Timer is for other part of code. I put the exactly values(amplitude, frequency) to hardware output, so it will be sending values to output on-the-fly. Trying visualize real hardware output signal. – Ing. Michal Hudak Apr 13 '12 at 14:11
    
@carny666: how to draw line and change line depending on the trackbars – Ing. Michal Hudak Apr 13 '12 at 14:14
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Lets start by creating the different signal types, this is a function that creates one wavelength of amplitude 1:

private PointF[] CreateBaseSignal(SignalType signalType)
{
  switch (signalType)
  {
    case SignalType.Sine:
      const int oversampling = 32;
      PointF[] signal = new PointF[oversampling];
      for (int i = 0; i < signal.Length; i++)
      {
        signal[i].X = (float) i / oversampling;
        signal[i].Y = Convert.ToSingle(Math.Sin((double) i / oversampling * 2 * Math.PI));
      }
      return signal;

    case SignalType.Square:
      return new PointF[]
      {
        new PointF(0.0f, -1.0f),
        new PointF(0.5f, -1.0f),
        new PointF(0.5f, 1.0f),
        new PointF(1.0f, 1.0f),
      };

    case SignalType.Triangle:
      return new PointF[]
      {
        new PointF(0.0f, -1.0f),
        new PointF(0.5f, 1.0f),
      };

    case SignalType.Sawtooth:
      return new PointF[]
      {
        new PointF(0.0f, -1.0f),
        new PointF(1.0f, 1.0f),
      };

    default:
      throw new ArgumentException("Invalid signal type", "signalType");
  }
}

Then we create the actual signal with the selected amplitude and frequency:

private PointF[] CreateSignal(PointF[] baseSignal, float frequency, float amplitude)
{
  PointF[] signal = new PointF[Convert.ToInt32(Math.Ceiling(baseSignal.Length * frequency))];
  for(int i = 0; i < signal.Length; i++)
  {
    signal[i].X = baseSignal[i % baseSignal.Length].X / frequency + (i / baseSignal.Length) / frequency;
    signal[i].Y = baseSignal[i % baseSignal.Length].Y * amplitude;
  }
  return signal;
}

Before attempting to plot this signal to a PictureBox, we scale the signal to fit the width and height:

private PointF[] ScaleSignal(PointF[] signal, int width, int height)
{
  const float maximumAmplitude = 10.0f;
  PointF[] scaledSignal = new PointF[signal.Length];
  for(int i = 0; i < signal.Length; i++)
  {
    scaledSignal[i].X = signal[i].X * width;
    scaledSignal[i].Y = signal[i].Y * height / 2 / maximumAmplitude;
  }
  return scaledSignal;
}

Using Graphics.DrawLine to plot the signal is way better than Bitmap.SetPixel, since the data points will be connected even at high frequencies. Bitmap.SetPixel is also very slow, you really need to use Bitmap.LockBits and unsafe code for manipulating single pixels to achieve any decent performance. Using Graphics.DrawLine, you also have control over line width, anti-aliasing etc.

Since we have stored the signal in a PointF array, we can use the simple Graphics.DrawLines method to plot the signal instead of iterating over the data points:

private void PlotSignal(PointF[] signal, PictureBox pictureBox)
{
  Bitmap bmp = new Bitmap(pictureBox.ClientSize.Width, pictureBox.ClientSize.Height);
  signal = ScaleSignal(signal, bmp.Width, bmp.Height); // Scale signal to fit image

  using(Graphics gfx = Graphics.FromImage(bmp))
  {
    gfx.SmoothingMode = SmoothingMode.HighQuality;
    gfx.TranslateTransform(0, bmp.Height / 2); // Move Y=0 to center of image
    gfx.ScaleTransform(1, -1); // Make positive Y axis point upward
    gfx.DrawLine(Pens.Black, 0, 0, bmp.Width, 0); // Draw zero axis
    gfx.DrawLines(Pens.Blue, signal); // Draw signal
  }

  // Make sure the bitmap is disposed the next time around
  Image old = pictureBox.Image;
  pictureBox.Image = bmp;
  if(old != null)
    old.Dispose();
}

If you redraw the signal often, you probably want to reuse the the Bitmap and Graphics objects instead of creating new ones each time. Just remember to call Graphics.Clear between each redraw.

Putting everything together in one big statement:

PlotSignal(
  CreateSignal(
    CreateBaseSignal(signalType),
    frequency,
    amplitude),
  thePictureBox);
share|improve this answer

If you're after a fast plotting library, I really like Dynamic Data Display

Dynamic Data Display

This is a WPF component, but for fast, smooth drawing applications I really think it is worthwhile to port to WPF sooner rathar than later. It feels like you're not too far into your project at the moment anyway.

Development for WPF seems to have stopped for this component (although it continues to be worked on for Silverlight). The documentation is terrible but the source code is available from the link above so you can extend it as needed (it's quite well written and very extensible) and the source is invaluable as a substitute for the near complete lack of any documentation.

share|improve this answer

Assuming you want to plot a sin wave on a picture box control, create a picture box control on your form then perform the following:

    int width = pictureBox1.Width;
    int height = pictureBox1.Height;
    Bitmap b = new Bitmap(width, height);

    for (int i = 0; i < width; i++)
    {
        int y = (int)((Math.Sin((double)i * 2.0 * Math.PI / width) + 1.0) * (height - 1) / 2.0);
        b.SetPixel(i, y, System.Drawing.Color.Red);
    }
    pictureBox1.Image = b;
share|improve this answer
    
This draw sine line, and how can I regulate anplitude and frequency ? I am asssuming that bold values will change Amplitude and frequency. What are ratios ? How to calculate them? int y = (int)((Math.Sin((double)i * 2.0 * Math.PI / width) + 1.0) * (height - 1) / 2.0); – Ing. Michal Hudak Apr 13 '12 at 14:34

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