Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using Spring since a few months for now, and I thought dependency injection with the @Autowired annotation also required a setter for the field to inject.

So, I am using it like this:

@Controller
public class MyController {

    @Autowired
    MyService injectedService;

    public void setMyService(MyService injectedService) {
        this.injectedService = injectedService;
    }

    ...

}

But I've tried this today:

@Controller
public class MyController {

    @Autowired
    MyService injectedService;

    ...

}

And oh surprise, no compilation errors, no errors at startup, the application is running perfectly...

So my question is, is the setter required for dependency injection with the @Autowired annotation?

I'm using Spring 3.1.1.

share|improve this question
2  
Seems like you've answered your own question. –  darrengorman Apr 13 '12 at 13:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You don't need a setter with the @Autowired, the value is set by reflection.

Check this post for complete explanation How does Spring @Autowired work

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick reply ! –  Tony Apr 13 '12 at 13:02
    
Don't forget to up the linked post ;) –  Arnaud Gourlay Apr 13 '12 at 13:05
    
Field can be private and Spring Autowired works without setter too. –  chalimartines Apr 13 '12 at 13:17

No, if Java security policy allows Spring to change the access rights for the package protected field a setter is not required.

share|improve this answer
package com.techighost;

public class Test {

    private Test2 test2;

    public Test() {
        System.out.println("Test constructor called");
    }

    public Test2 getTest2() {
        return test2;
    }
}


package com.techighost;

public class Test2 {

    private int i;

    public Test2() {
        i=5;
        System.out.println("test2 constructor called");
    }

    public int getI() {
        return i;
    }
}


package com.techighost;

import java.lang.reflect.Field;

public class TestReflection {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws ClassNotFoundException, InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException {
        Class<?> class1 = Class.forName("com.techighost.Test");
        Object object = class1.newInstance();
        Field[] field = class1.getDeclaredFields();
        field[0].setAccessible(true);
        System.out.println(field[0].getType());
        field[0].set(object,Class.forName(field[0].getType().getName()).newInstance() );
        Test2 test2 = ((Test)object).getTest2();
        System.out.println("i="+test2.getI());

    }
}

This is how it is done using reflection.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.