Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a nested for-loop structure and right now I am re-declaring the vector at the start of each iteration:

void function (n1,n2,bound,etc){

    for (int i=0; i<bound; i++){
             vector< vector<long long> > vec(n1, vector<long long>(n2));
             //about three more for-loops here
    }
}

This allows me to "start fresh" each iteration, which works great because my internal operations are largely in the form of vec[a][b] += some value. But I worry that it's slow for large n1 or large n2. I don't know the underlying architecture of vectors/arrays/etc so I am not sure what the fastest way is to handle this situation. Should I use an array instead? Should I clear it differently? Should I handle the logic differently altogether?

EDIT: The vector's size technically does not change each iteration (but it may change based on function parameters). I'm simply trying to clear it/etc so the program is as fast as humanly possible given all other circumstances.

EDIT:

My results of different methods:

Timings (for a sample set of data):
reclaring vector method: 111623 ms
clearing/resizing method: 126451 ms
looping/setting to 0 method: 88686 ms
share|improve this question
    
post the 'three more for loops', the type of data structure you should use depends on what you plan on doing with it –  Justin Kirk Apr 13 '12 at 13:22
    
AFAIK the fastest way to clear a vector is to std::swap it (std::swap(vec, vector<long>()). Could be wrong though. imho without knowing more about your algorithm, it's hard to say, as Justin says. –  Robinson Apr 13 '12 at 13:22
    
How large are bound, n1 and n2 in relation to each other? –  leftaroundabout Apr 13 '12 at 13:23
    
There's another i-to-bound for loop and then a few other smaller ones that are trivial (in other words, it's O(n^2)). n1 is in the millions and bound is around there, too. –  John Smith Apr 13 '12 at 13:25

8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Here is some code that tests a few different methods.

#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
  typedef std::chrono::high_resolution_clock clock;

  unsigned n1 = 1000;
  unsigned n2 = 1000;

  // Original method
  {
    auto start = clock::now();
    for (unsigned i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
    {
      std::vector<std::vector<long long>> vec(n1, std::vector<long long>(n2));
      // vec is initialized to zero already

      // do stuff
    }
    auto elapsed_time = clock::now() - start;

    std::cout << elapsed_time.count() << std::endl;
  }


  // reinitialize values to zero at every pass in the loop
  {
    auto start = clock::now();
    std::vector<std::vector<long long>> vec(n1, std::vector<long long>(n2));
    for (unsigned i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
    {
      // initialize vec to zero at the start of every loop
      for (unsigned j = 0; j < n1; ++j)
        for (unsigned k = 0; k < n2; ++k)
            vec[j][k] = 0;

      // do stuff
    }
    auto elapsed_time = clock::now() - start;

    std::cout << elapsed_time.count() << std::endl;
  }

  // clearing the vector this way is not optimal since it will destruct the
  // inner vectors
  {
    auto start = clock::now();
    std::vector<std::vector<long long>> vec(n1, std::vector<long long>(n2));
    for (unsigned i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
    {
      vec.clear();
      vec.resize(n1, std::vector<long long>(n2));

      // do stuff
    }
    auto elapsed_time = clock::now() - start;

    std::cout << elapsed_time.count() << std::endl;
  }

  // equivalent to the second method from above
  // no performace penalty
  {
    auto start = clock::now();
    std::vector<std::vector<long long>> vec(n1, std::vector<long long>(n2));
    for (unsigned i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
    {
      for (unsigned j = 0; j < n1; ++j)
      {
        vec[j].clear();
        vec[j].resize(n2);
      }

      // do stuff
    }
    auto elapsed_time = clock::now() - start;

    std::cout << elapsed_time.count() << std::endl;
  }
}

Edit: I've updated the code to make a fairer comparison between the methods. Edit 2: Cleaned up the code a bit, methods 2 or 4 are the way to go.

Here are the timings of the above four methods on my computer:

16327389
15216024
16371469
15279471

The point is that you should try out different methods and profile your code.

share|improve this answer
    
I need to reset the values each iteration though somehow, and quickly, since my bound is large –  John Smith Apr 13 '12 at 13:51
    
Given the code you posted originally, you have to be doing that somewhere inside the loops anyway, correct? I edited my answer to show how vec might be initialized somewhere in your inner loop. –  James Custer Apr 13 '12 at 13:53
4  
Can the downvoter explain what's wrong with this? –  James Custer Apr 13 '12 at 14:07
    
@JohnSmith I've added some timings to the various methods in my answer. –  James Custer Apr 13 '12 at 14:24
    
I do a lot of adding-to-element operations in my inner loops and so clearing is a necessity in this case -- I can't use the second method. –  John Smith Apr 13 '12 at 14:31

I have a clear preference for small scopes (i.e. declaring the variable in the innermost loop if it’s only used there) but for large sizes this could cause a lot of allocations.

So if this loop is a performance problem, try declaring the variable outside the loop and merely clearing it inside the loop – however, this is only advantageous if the (reserved) size of the vector stays identical. If you are resizing the vector, then you get reallocations anyway.

Don’t use a raw array – it doesn’t give you any advantage, and only trouble.

share|improve this answer
    
A raw array is indeed bad, but it does give the advantage of no heap allocations. std::array is often a great compromise. –  leftaroundabout Apr 13 '12 at 13:25
1  
@leftaroundabout You are talking about statically allocated arrays, that’s completely different. And yes, using those would have an advantage. I’m assuming that the OP is talking about dynamic sizes and there a raw array also uses heap allocations. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 13 '12 at 13:26
    
Actually the vector's size doesn't change each iteration, editing OP –  John Smith Apr 13 '12 at 13:30
1  
@John clear kills the size but doesn’t actually free up any memory. Hence, reallocation doesn’t happen. clear followed by resize reinitialises the vector’s elements without costly heap allocations. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 13 '12 at 14:19
1  
@JohnSmith did you clear the whole outer std::vector? That does call all the destructors of the inner std::vectors, so most of the reallocations still take place with this approach. Only with calling clear on each of the elements you get the no-reallocations bahaviour. –  leftaroundabout Apr 13 '12 at 15:34

When choosing a container i usually use this diagram to help me:

enter image description here

source


Other than that,

Like previously posted if this is causing performance problems declare the container outside of the for loop and just clear it at the start of each iteration

share|improve this answer
4  
Diagram = happiness :D –  Alex Z Apr 13 '12 at 13:31
    
A nice guide, but in this case the OP is already at the best node shown for his problem (std::vector), which may however not actually be the best option there is. –  leftaroundabout Apr 13 '12 at 13:34
    
I don’t see how this diagram is relevant to the question. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 13 '12 at 13:35
    
He has not indicated what is happening in the contents of his for loop, how could you possibly know that vector is the best node ?, It's relevant because as he states "I don't know the underlying architecture of vectors/arrays/etc" –  Justin Kirk Apr 13 '12 at 13:37
1  
Even with my caveat mentioned above, and even with bames’, I fail to understand the downvotes on this answer … –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 13 '12 at 14:45

In addition to the previous comments :

if you use Robinson's swap method, you could go ever faster by handling that swap asynchronously.

share|improve this answer

Why not something like that :

{
    vector< vector<long long> > vec(n1, vector<long long>(n2));

    for (int i=0; i<bound; i++){

         //about three more for-loops here

         vec.clear();
    }
}

Edit: added scope braces ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
See my answer. This has the (admittedly, relatively small) problem of scope leak. In a moderately complicated code, keeping track of variables (their state, and what they do) is vastly easier the smaller their scope is. I have written code where decreasing a variable’s scope has made a big difference in debuggability and understandability. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 13 '12 at 13:34
    
For some reason my program crashes when I try this? –  John Smith Apr 13 '12 at 13:49
1  
That's because when you clear the vector, the size of the vector is also cleared. That is, vec.size() == 0. If you clear the vector you must resize it. –  James Custer Apr 13 '12 at 13:52
    
Is there an efficient way to clear it without resizing it? Or is simply redeclaring the vector like I've been doing the best I can do? –  John Smith Apr 13 '12 at 13:56
    
@John: Clearing erases all the existing elements, so it would make no sense for the size to be anything but 0 since all the contained objects were already destroyed! The right course of action would be clear followed by resize, or just recreating the vector. –  danielkza Apr 16 '12 at 16:56

Well if you are really concerned about performance (and you know the size of n1 and n2 beforehand) but don't want to use a C-style array, std::array may be your friend.

EDIT: Given your edit, it seems an std::array isn't an appropriate substitute since while the vector size does not change each iteration, it still isn't known before compilation.

share|improve this answer
    
I am very much concerned about performance; these loops are large and I must optimize for speed –  John Smith Apr 13 '12 at 13:33
    
clear won't do the trick on its own though. You'd have to resize back out to the needed dimensions again, and at that point you might as well do it the obvious way that the OP already uses. –  Mark B Apr 13 '12 at 14:27

Since you have to reset the vector values to 0 each iteration, in practical terms, this question boils down to "is the cost of allocating and deallocating the memory for the vector cheap or expensive compared to the computations inside the loops".

Assuming the computations are the expensive part of the algorithm, the way you've coded it is both clear, concise, shows the intended scope, and is probably just as fast as alternate approaches.

If however your computations and updates are extremely fast and the allocation/deallocation of the vector is relatively expensive, you could use std::fill to fill zeroes back into the array at the end/beginning of each iteration through the loop.

Of course the only way to know for sure is to measure with a profiler. I suspect you'll find that the approach you took won't show up as a hotspot of any sort and you should leave the obvious code in place.

share|improve this answer

The overhead of using a vector vs an array is minor, especially when you are getting a lot of useful functionality from the vector. Internally a vector allocates an array. So vector is the way to go.

share|improve this answer
2  
The overhead of operating on std::vectors is minor, but they have quite a lot of overhead in allocation because they reside on the heap. –  leftaroundabout Apr 13 '12 at 13:27
1  
@leftaroundabout I am referring to dynamically allocated arrays which are allocated on the heap. The function in the loop is being passed both as variable values (n1, n2). –  ManiP Apr 13 '12 at 13:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.