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Using this code example

#!/usr/bin/ruby
paragraph = "champion xylophone excellent"
paragraph = paragraph.gsub("ch","tj")
words = paragraph.split(/ /)
words.each do |word|
   if word[0,1] == "x"
     word[0.1] = "z" 
   end
end
paragraph = words.join(" ")
paragraph.gsub("x","ks")
print paragraph

The output will be 'tjampion zylophone excellent' rather than 'tjampion zylophone ekscellent'

The same applies if the gsub is applied within the each to the individual words. I don't understand why it acts at the beginning but not at the end.

Edit

Second case is a distinct issue from the first:

#!/usr/bin/ruby
paragraph = "champion xylophone excellent"
paragraph = paragraph.gsub("ch","tj")
words = paragraph.split(/ /)
words.each do |word|
   if word[0,1] == "x"
     word[0.1] = "z" 
   end
   word = word.gsub("x","ks")
end
paragraph = words.join(" ")
print paragraph
share|improve this question
    
See below I updated. One line of code can do all operations. – texasbruce Apr 13 '12 at 14:42
up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you first use gsub you are assigning it to paragrah

paragraph = paragraph.gsub("ch","tj")

The second time you are missing the assignment

change paragraph.gsub("x","ks") to

paragraph = paragraph.gsub("x","ks")
share|improve this answer
5  
or change to 'paragraph.gsub!("x","ks")' – megas Apr 13 '12 at 13:39
    
What a plonker, you are right! Any thoughts about the second case as that seems to be different altogether? – jaz9090 Apr 13 '12 at 13:40

Your code is working by accident. The working parts use methods on strings that modify the string; the not working parts use methods that produce a new string (which is discarded). This is confusing; a better way would be to use map if the desired result is an array. It would contain the results of the block, either modified strings or new ones.

paragraph = "champion xylophone excellent"
words = paragraph.split(' ').map do |word|
  word.gsub('ch','tj') #new string
  word[0.1] = "z" if word.start_with?('x') #modified string
  word.gsub!('x','ks') #modified string
end
puts words.join(' ')
share|improve this answer
paragraph.gsub!("x","ks")
puts paragraph

Or use RegExp (one line operation can do all):

paragraph = "champion xylophone excellent"
paragraph = paragraph.gsub("ch","tj").gsub(/([\A\s])x(\w*)/){$1 + 'z'+ $2}.gsub("x","ks")

puts paragraph
share|improve this answer
    
does using the assignment operator create a new 'word' element in my code ? – jaz9090 Apr 13 '12 at 13:48
    
No. obj.each only pass the "VALUE" of the reference (rather than pass by reference; a bit confusing and worth a bit digging deep). For example, [1,2].each { |x| x += 1} will still give [1,2] – texasbruce Apr 13 '12 at 13:54

If you want your gsub to be destructive, i.e. to change the value of the variable on which it was called, use gsub!. so:

paragraph.gsub!('ch', 'tj')

rather than:

paragraph = paragraph.gsub('ch', 'tj')

It's more concise, and Ruby developers recognize bang (!) methods as destructive. And in your case, you need the gsub! method in place of both calls to gsub

share|improve this answer
    
Why does word = word.gsub("x","ks") not work though? – jaz9090 Apr 13 '12 at 13:42
    
there is a typo in the second example, not sure if it causes the problem though: word[0.1] = "z" shouldn't the . be a ,? – Patrick Klingemann Apr 13 '12 at 13:44
    
Doesn't seem to be the issue, fixing it results in the same output – jaz9090 Apr 13 '12 at 13:47

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