Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a VS2008 I want to copy certain files from a directory into my /bin/ folder. I have set the files (located in /common/browserhawk/) to "Copy to Output Directory". However, it copies the folder structure as well: the files are copied to /bin/common/browserhawk/

How do I get these files to copy to just /bin/? I do not want to store these in the root of the website to get them to copy correctly.

Related Question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1013419/visual-studio-adds-dll-and-pdb-to-project-after-compiling/1013561

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 49 down vote accepted

You can add a Post Build Event to copy the files. Goto project properties, Build Events tab and add the following to the Post-build event command line:

copy "$(ProjectDir)\common\browserhawk*.*" "$(TargetDir)"

Be sure to include the quotes if your project path has spaces in it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that advice, as it has just worked for me in VS2012 as well. –  Dib Sep 30 '14 at 5:40

Since I cannot comment on previous answers, I will put the solution here:

Adding to what @PaulAlexander provided, add the following to your .csproj/.vbproj file:

<ItemGroup>
    <AvailableItemName Include="RootContent">
      <Visible>false</Visible>
    </AvailableItemName>  
</ItemGroup>
<Target Name="AfterBuild">
    <Copy
        DestinationFolder="$(OutputPath)"
        SourceFiles="@(RootContent)"
        SkipUnchangedFiles="true"
        />  
</Target>

This allows you to select "RootContent" as the Build Action in the Properties window, and all can be accessed via the GUI. A more complete explanation: the "AvailableItemName" option basically creates a new named-list that you can assign items in the project to under the "Build Action" property in the Properties window. You can then use this newly created list in any Target you like (eg via "@(RootContent)").

share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer, just used this myself to success! –  Chris Marisic Jan 21 '11 at 17:57
    
Also note that VS 2010 (not sure about older versions) will complain about AvailableItemName being an invalid element if you edit the project file within VS; just ignore the warning, it works anyway. –  Aaronaught Oct 8 '11 at 12:39
    
Unfortunately this only copies the file into the output directory of the project the file belongs to - and not in the output directory of the startup project. This is important when using this in a library project. –  Sebastian Krysmanski Sep 5 '12 at 13:08
    
@SebastianKrysmanski that means you don't have the output directories for your projects set to point to the same directory. –  Jonathon Reinhart Sep 13 '12 at 17:18
2  
This works great for building in release and debug mode with vs2008 but it does not seem to work when using one click publishing. Any suggestions? –  Soenhay Apr 17 '13 at 17:38

If you edit the .csproj / .vbproj in a text editor, you can control where the file is placed in the output directory, and also what name the file will have in the output directory. For example:

<None Include="content\someContent.txt">
  <Link>someContentInOutputDirectory.txt</Link>
  <CopyToOutputDirectory>PreserveNewest</CopyToOutputDirectory>
</None>

This will put the file content\someContent.txt into bin\someContentInOutputDirectory.txt. You can also choose a subdirectory in bin if you want; simply add it to the Link element.

share|improve this answer
3  
Wow, was I lucky to need this now and not two days ago. Thanks; this is great! –  Yuki Izumi Feb 6 '14 at 5:49
    
I don't think that's what the 'Link' property does. I believe it is used to include files external files into your project without copying those in your project ? –  toong Apr 9 '14 at 6:50
2  
Oh my god, thank you. I just spent 6 hours trying to fix some corner-case garbage where VS wasn't copying .dll's in an intelligent way. This is the real answer to life, the universe and everything. –  Brandon May 8 '14 at 15:50
3  
This is by far the best solution –  PhilHdt Jun 20 '14 at 20:11
2  
This should be set as the correct answer –  Durden81 Jul 23 '14 at 8:48

I believe the XCOPY command handles directories and files better. Therefore,

    XCOPY "$(ProjectDir)common/browserhawk" "$(TargetDir)" /E /I /F /Y

Which allows for creating folders off the target directory.

    XCOPY "$(ProjectDir)Templates" "$(TargetDir)" /E /I /F /Y

The Project folder/file structure of:

    A:\TEMP\CONSOLEAPPLICATION3\TEMPLATES
    ├───NewFolder1
    ├───NewFolder2
    │       TextFile1.txt
    │       TextFile2.txt
    └───NewFolder3
            TextFile1.txt
            TextFile2.txt
            TextFile3.txt

Becomes:

    A:\TEMP\CONSOLEAPPLICATION3\BIN\DEBUG
    │   ConsoleApplication3.exe
    │   ConsoleApplication3.pdb
    │   ConsoleApplication3.vshost.exe
    │   ConsoleApplication3.vshost.exe.manifest
    ├───NewFolder1
    ├───NewFolder2
    │       TextFile1.txt
    │       TextFile2.txt
    │
    └───NewFolder3
            TextFile1.txt
            TextFile2.txt
            TextFile3.txt
share|improve this answer
1  
Easiest solution. And works for VS Express! thanks. –  CrazyTim Jun 6 '12 at 6:35

Add the following to your .csproj/.vbproj file

<Target Name="AfterBuild">
    <Copy
        DestinationFolder="$(OutputPath)"
        SourceFiles="@(RootContent)"
        SkipUnchangedFiles="true"
        />  
</Target>

Then change the Build Action of any files you want in the root folder to RootContent.

share|improve this answer
    
Great! Can you access this through the VS 2008 dialogs? –  bobobobo Feb 21 '10 at 16:41
    
Not through the dialogs...but you can edit your project in VS. Right-click the project and select Unload Project. Then right click and select Edit. Then you can edit the MSBuild file that is your project. –  Paul Alexander Feb 21 '10 at 18:15
2  
Thanks, this looks useful. Unfortuntely, even after adding your snippet to the .vbproj file, RootContent does not show up in the "Build Action" dropdown list and entering it manually results in a "Property value is not valid" error from Visual Studio. What did I miss? –  Heinzi May 19 '10 at 14:07
    
Not working with Visual Studio 2010 C# Console Application project. –  AMissico Jul 29 '10 at 15:58
    
Not working with Visual Studio 2010 VB.NET Console Application project. –  AMissico Jul 29 '10 at 16:00

I ended up adding a step to the nant build file to copy after successful compliation

<target name="action.copy.browserhawk.config" depends="compile.source">
	<copy todir="${App.Web.dir}/bin/" includeemptydirs="false">
		<fileset basedir="${browserhawk.config.dir}">
			<include name="bhawk_bb.dat" />
			<include name="bhawk_sp.dat" />
			<include name="browserhawk.properties" />
			<include name="maindefs.bdd" />
			<include name="maindefs.bdf" />
			<include name="BH_PRO.lic" />
		</fileset>
	</copy>
	<echo message="COPY BROWSERHAWK CONFIG: SUCCESS   ${datetime::now()}" />
</target>
share|improve this answer
3  
-1; Because answer relies on NAnt. –  AMissico Jul 29 '10 at 17:40
    
what is a nant? –  nawfal Sep 29 '12 at 10:14
2  
+1 because for someone using nant this is still a helpful answer –  Hainesy Nov 2 '12 at 10:03

You could build a batch file to copy the files and execute it as a post-build event.

share|improve this answer
    
I ended up doing this for one of my projects (although I used a Python script rather than a bat). –  Fire Lancer Apr 6 '10 at 22:37

I have been using this in VS2010. I prefer this solution because:

  1. The XML is reusable in any project
  2. The "RootContent" is chosen as a Build Action in the Visual Studio UI, just like any other "Content"
  3. The "CopyToOutputDirectory" is obeyed, just as you would expect
  4. The RootContent is added to the project's output: gets carried through Project-References, obeys "Clean", etc.

Toward the beginning of project file:

  <ItemGroup>
    <AvailableItemName Include="RootContent">
      <!-- Add "RootContent" as a choice in the "Build Action" dropdown. -->
      <Visible>False</Visible>
    </AvailableItemName>
  </ItemGroup>

Borrowed From This Answer

After the Microsoft .targets Import:

  <PropertyGroup>
    <AssignTargetPathsDependsOn>
      $(AssignTargetPathsDependsOn);
      IncludeRootContentAsContent;
    </AssignTargetPathsDependsOn>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <Target Name="IncludeRootContentAsContent">
    <CreateItem Include="@(RootContent)" AdditionalMetadata="TargetPath=%(Filename)%(Extension)">
      <Output ItemName="ContentWithTargetPath" TaskParameter="Include" />
    </CreateItem>
  </Target>

Borrowed From This Answer

share|improve this answer
    
This is good - I would swap out RootContent which implies "hard coded" to CustomContent to indicate this is specialized content we're adding to this project and we need copied in this particular way. Also as an aside, I needed TargetPath=%(RecursiveDir)%(Filename)%(Extension) to recreate the folder structure from the specified CustomContent files to the output path. –  Jonno May 5 at 0:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.