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I have a Java method with a switch statement.

It’s working fine, but I have a lot of cases, perhaps 20 or more, as shown below.

switch (result)  // result is of type Enum
{
    case 1:
        break;

    case 2:
        break;

    //----
    //----
    //----

    default:
        break;
}  // End of Switch 

Please let me know how to shift these cases into another file.

share|improve this question
2  
Yes, cut + paste? What do you mean "shift" these case statements? – Kirk Woll Apr 13 '12 at 13:50
    
yeah yeah , assume i did cut paste , how can i refer them back from another file ?? – Gajjini Apr 13 '12 at 13:51
    
What do you mean, "refer back from another file"? – Kirk Woll Apr 13 '12 at 13:52
    
It's not a direct answer, but you could use methods to keep the case compact: switch(flag) { case 1: doSomething(); break; } – Carlo Apr 13 '12 at 13:55
    
can you explain what is done inside each case? maybe then it will be easier to find something common – adranale Apr 13 '12 at 13:59
up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, Java does not have an #include facility like C does.

You're better off simply refactoring your logic. The fact that you're asking at all tells me you may well need some better abstractions.

But, at a minimum you could do:

public class HandleCases {

    public static Result handleCase1(...parameters...) {
        ...
    }

    public static Result handleCase2(...parameters...) {
        ...
    }

    public static Result handleCase3(...parameters...) {
        ...
    }
}

and then:

Result r = null;

switch(flag) {

    case 1:
        r = HandleCases.handleCase1( ... );
        break;

    case 2:
        r = HandleCases.handleCase1( ... );
        break;

    case 3:
        r = HandleCases.handleCase1( ... );
        break;
    ...
 }

The Result holder is where you can get back any values you need.

But overall this is a patchwork, your design could probably use some work.

share|improve this answer
    
That's what I wanted to suggest for a quick solution (+1). About the redesign, maybe Java's dynamic dispatch can do the switch (see my post below). – DaveFar Apr 13 '12 at 14:22

if the switch condition is an actual enum, you can implement a method on the enum, e.g.

public enum Colors {
    RED { public void run() { /* do stuff for red */ } },
    GREEN { public void run() { /* do stuff for green */ } },
    BLUE { public void run() { /* do stuff for blue */ } },

    public abstract void run();  
}

your switch would then be a method call:

Color result = ...;
// was switch (result) { case RED: ... }
result.run();

The result is the "switch" is in a separate file. Enums make it easy, but still have all the "switch" code in one file, just now the enum's file. You could follow the same pattern, defining each constant in its own singleton class, and all implement the same interface/abstract class, to get each condition in a separate file.

If you have lots of switches that do different things with the same constants, another option to explore is the visitor pattern. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visitor_pattern

share|improve this answer

You can't do that. What you can do, however, is that if you have multiple case statements for the same condition, then you can group them together. This is called Fall Through.

switch(flag) {
    case 1:
    case 3:
    case 5:
        System.out.println("Odd");
        break;
    case 2:
    case 4:
    case 6:
        System.out.println("Even");
        break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
What's wrong, @downvoter? – adarshr Apr 13 '12 at 14:08

For an immediate solution without redesign, you can use Will's solution. But as he already pointed out, it seems you should do a redesign.

For this, consider the following code example from http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?SwitchStatementsSmell, which uses dynamic dispatch instead of a manual switch statement:

method foo(int thingType) {
    switch (thingType) {
        case TYPE_ONE:
            oneFoo();
            break;
        case TYPE_TWO:
            twoFoo();
            break;
        case TYPE_THREE:
            threeFoo();
            break;
        case TYPE_FOUR:
            fourFoo();
            break;
    }
}


method oneFoo() {
}


method twoFoo() {
}


method threeFoo() {
}


method fourFoo() {
}


method bar(int thingType) {
    switch (thingType) {
        case TYPE_ONE:
            oneBar();
            break;
        case TYPE_TWO:
            twoBar();
            break;
        case TYPE_THREE:
            threeBar();
            break;
        case TYPE_FOUR:
            fourBar();
            break;
    }
}


method oneBar() {
}


method twoBar() {
}


method threeBar() {
}


method fourBar() {
}

versus

class one extends base {
    method foo() {
    }
    method bar() {
    }
}
class two extends base {
    method foo() {
    }
    method bar() {
    }
}
class three extends base {
    method foo() {
    }
    method bar() {
    }
}
class four extends base {
    method foo() {
    }
    method bar() {
    }
}

Then you can simply call anObjectOfTypeBase.foo() and anObjectOfTypeBase.bar().

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It depends on how you want to do it.

First, if the logic is related to the same class (and it is tightly coupled), then no, you can't just shift it out to another one. However, if you want to separate the logic from this class to another one, then it's possible to create a static method in another class to just perform the switch statement.

Alternatively, you can revisit and refactor your code such that a switch statement of 20 isn't necessary.

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No, you can't. In Java the entire code of the same class has to be on the same file, even more the code of the same method or statement.

What you can do, if you have many cases is too trasform your "switch" approach in an HashMap approach. You can create for example an abstract Action class, and put in the Map many actions, that are different classes on different files. Then in your code you can do something like this:

Action action = map.get(result);
if (action != null)
   action.execute();
else
   // default case

This pattern is called Command Pattern.

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