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I've got a general question about AJAX. Is it okay to send JavaScript in an AJAX response and execute it? Or is the only elegant way to respond either with JSON or plain HTML? My problem is that I am searching for the best way to handle AJAX requests which are leading to the insertion of HTML OR the execution of JavaScript, depending on user data.

Thanks a lot.

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Is your connection always secured? –  Phil H Apr 13 '12 at 14:12
    
No, it is a normal HTTP connection –  linsenfips Apr 13 '12 at 14:32

3 Answers 3

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I would think that the JavaScript function that would be executed after the AJAX response would be standard for everyone aside from some variable. If that is the case, you should include the JavaScript function in your scripts file that gets loaded normally in the . Then have the AJAX response come back with the variable that you need, like the user ID. Then use that variable to call the JavaScript function normally instead of injecting a new function each time.

If HTML is returned you can insert it directly into the DOM on a successful AJAX request.

I think the way to go would be to always return JSON even if it's an HTML response. The JSON response could be something like:

{"responseType":"HTML", "varID":null, "payload":"<div>some html</div>"}

If the response were type JS then the varID could have that variable and the payload could be null. That's just an example but you could do something similar to standardize the response but handle both scenarios.

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How can I determine, if my AJAX respond is JSON or HTML? –  linsenfips Apr 13 '12 at 14:26
    
It's hard to say without knowing more about how your program functions. You could use two different AJAX methods, one that only returns HTML and one that returns a variable to execute the JavaScript, or you could include something in the response that lets you know what type of response it is, so just a variable that either says 'HTML' or 'JS' then check that variable when the response comes back to take the appropriate action. –  Matt Mombrea Apr 13 '12 at 14:32
    
But this variable would then be part of JSON. So I have to have the HTML embedded in JSON. Or is it possible to have an additional variable besides the response payload? –  linsenfips Apr 13 '12 at 14:35
    
Ya, I think the way to go would be to always return JSON even if it's an HTML response. The JSON response could be something like {"responseType":"HTML", "varID":null, "payload":"<div>some html</div>"} if the response were type JS then the varID could have that variable and the payload could be null. That's just an example but you could do something similar to standardize the response but handle both scenarios. –  Matt Mombrea Apr 13 '12 at 14:48
    
Ok, I just did it like this. Works fine! Thanks –  linsenfips Apr 13 '12 at 15:18

No it's ok to do so, in jQuery $.getScript do just that, it get the file via ajax and then evaluate it. Which is why no script tags are ever added when using getScript

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Executing javascript received by an ajax call is a bad idea as this can lead to XSS style attacks (eval is evil and all that jazz).

An AJAX response is best served up in JSON format and then the client side scripting can act in accordance with the JSON it receives.

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