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See subject of positing for question.

1) I recall seeing a really cool option in VB.NET using LINQ to match using "LIKE%'

2) I know regular expressions will work and I suspect that will result in the shortest code and probably won't be too hard to read for such a simple test.

Here's what I did. Warning: You're gonna hate it.

Private Shared Function FileNameIsOk(ByVal fileName As String) As Boolean

    For Position As Integer = 0 To fileName.Length - 1

        Dim Character As String = fileName.Substring(Position, 1).ToUpper
        Dim AsciiCharacter As Integer = Asc(Character)

        Select Case True

            Case Character = "_" 'allow _
            Case Character = "." 'allow .
            Case AsciiCharacter >= Asc("A") And AsciiCharacter <= Asc("A") 'Allow alphas
            Case AsciiCharacter >= Asc("0") AndAlso AsciiCharacter <= Asc("9") 'allow digits

            Case Else 'otherwise, invalid character
                Return False

        End Select

    Next

    Return True

End Function
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8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Old now, but I saw this and just had to add a new answer. The current accepted and other answers are just way more complicated than needed. In fact, it can be reduced to a single line:

Public Shared Function FilenameIsOK(ByVal fileName as String) as Boolean
    Return Not (Path.GetFileName(fileName).Intersect(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()).Any() OrElse Path.GetDirectoryName(fileName).Intersect(Path.GetInvalidPathChars()).Any()) 
End Function

Though I wouldn't recommend writing it that way. Break it up just a little bit to improve readability:

Public Shared Function FilenameIsOK(ByVal fileName as String) as Boolean
    Dim file As String = Path.GetFileName(fileName)
    Dim directory As String = Path.GetDirectoryName(fileName)

    Return Not (file.Intersect(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()).Any() _
                OrElse _ 
                directory.Intersect(Path.GetInvalidPathChars()).Any()) 
End Function

One other point here, is that often the best way to deal with file system issues is to let the file system tell you: just try to open or create the file in question, and deal with the exception. This works especially well, because you'll likely have to do this anyway. Anything you do here is duplicated effort for work you'll still have to put into an exception handler.

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Never to late to improve. Thanks. –  ChadD Jan 17 at 21:48

How about Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars and Path.GetInvalidPathChars?

Public Shared Function FilenameIsOK(ByVal fileNameAndPath as String) as Boolean
    Dim fileName = Path.GetFileName(fileNameAndPath)
    Dim directory = Path.GetDirectoryName(fileNameAndPath)
    For each c in Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()
        If fileName.Contains(c) Then
            Return False
        End If
    Next
    For each c in Path.GetInvalidPathChars()
        If directory.Contains(c) Then
            Return False
        End If
    Next
    Return True
End Function
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A surprise answer! Well done! –  ChadD Jun 19 '09 at 2:04
    
how can this possibly work? Because if the filename already has invalid characters in it, then attempting to get the Filename (line 1) is going to exception, because GetFilename calls CheckInvalidPathChars and therefore throws the exception –  Paul Farry Sep 13 '10 at 2:18
1  
I know this is an old question but the comment by Paul Farry above made me doubt the solution given, so I'd like to correct it in case anyone else has the same doubts. If you look at the definition for CheckInvalidPathChars it really only looks for 5 possible invalid characters while GetInvalidFileNameChars() returns a significantly longer list of invalid characters. So the method above is definitely going to catch all the issues while relying on Path.GetFilename to call CheckInvalidPathChars is not. –  Paul Sainsbury Apr 28 '11 at 10:45
    
Does not work with files that have Cantonese characters in name. I should probably start a new thread with a specific separate question; was hoping this would work. –  chaltahai Oct 22 '13 at 19:50

It is a regex and C# but:

using System;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

/// <summary>
/// Gets whether the specified path is a valid absolute file path.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="path">Any path. OK if null or empty.</param>
static public bool IsValidPath( string path )
{
    Regex r = new Regex( @"^(([a-zA-Z]\:)|(\\))(\\{1}|((\\{1})[^\\]([^/:*?<>""|]*))+)$" );
    return r.IsMatch( path );
}
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Is this OS independent? I'd be cautious just if the app ever gets run under Mono. –  Bob King Jun 22 '09 at 13:46
1  
+1 for being a two lines solutions, -1 for being English compatible only... :) –  Hertzel Guinness Dec 1 '10 at 14:47

Even though this is quite old, it's still valid, and I ended up here looking for the solution to how to check the filename for invalid characters. I looked at the accepted answer and found a few holes.

Hopefully these modifications are of some use to someone else.

Public Function FilenameIsOK(ByVal fileNameAndPath As String) As Boolean
    Dim fileName As String = String.Empty
    Dim theDirectory As String = fileNameAndPath

    Dim p As Char = Path.DirectorySeparatorChar

    Dim splitPath() As String
    splitPath = fileNameAndPath.Split(p)
    If splitPath.Length > 1 Then
        fileName = splitPath(splitPath.Length - 1)
        theDirectory = String.Join(p, splitPath, 0, splitPath.Length - 1)
    End If

    For Each c As Char In Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()
        If fileName.Contains(c) Then
            Return False
        End If
    Next

    For Each c As Char In Path.GetInvalidPathChars()
        If theDirectory.Contains(c) Then
            Return False
        End If
    Next
    Return True
End Function
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Frankly, I'd just use the FileInfo object built in to .NET, and check for an exception for invalidity. See this reference for details.

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The code might be trying to validate a path that it doesn't have access to though. –  patjbs Jun 18 '09 at 18:11
    
Exactly. As in my case. –  ChadD Jun 18 '09 at 18:17
2  
Using exceptions to handle control flow is bad practice! –  Bob King Jun 19 '09 at 13:27
1  
@BobKing: tell it to microsoft; it'd be great to have a validate() method on their FileInfo, but they've chosen to go with the exception route. –  Paul Sonier Jun 19 '09 at 18:05

try this

Public Function IsValidFileName(ByVal fn As String) As Boolean
    Try
        Dim fi As New IO.FileInfo(fn)
    Catch ex As Exception
        Return False
    End Try
    Return True
End Function
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You should never plan to use exceptions as part of the normal operation of your application - When passed an invalid filename, this would cause the CLR to generate a full stack trace (amongst other things) which is expensive. –  Basic Jan 7 '13 at 10:06
    
Bad practise or computational expense never stopped Microsoft! –  gls123 Jan 11 '13 at 9:45

Ok. Good ideas. But manual iteration of 'invalid' chars is not the best way, when you work with thousands of files.

Public BadChars() As Char = IO.Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars

For m = 0 To thousands_of_files - 1
    '..
    if currFile.Name.ToCharArray.Intersect(BadChars).Count > 1 Then
         ' the Name is invalid - what u gonna do? =)
    end if
    '..
    '..
Next
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Try this

Function IsValidFileNameOrPath(ByVal name As String) As Boolean

Dim i As Integer Dim dn, fn As String

    i = InStrRev(name, "\") : dn = Mid(name, 1, i) : fn = Mid(name, i + 1)
    MsgBox("directory = " & dn & " : file = " & fn)

    If name Is Nothing Or Trim(fn) = "" Then
        MsgBox("null filename" & fn)
        Return False
    Else
        For Each badchar As Char In Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars
            If InStr(fn, badchar) > 0 Then
                MsgBox("invalid filename" & fn)
                Return False
            End If
        Next
    End If

    If dn <> "" Then
        If InStr(dn, "\\") > 0 Then
            MsgBox("duplicate \ =  " & dn)
            Return False
        End If
        For Each badChar As Char In Path.GetInvalidPathChars
            If InStr(dn, badChar) > 0 Then
                MsgBox("invalid directory=  " & dn)
                Return False
            End If
        Next
        If Not System.IO.Directory.Exists(dn) Then
            Try
                Directory.CreateDirectory(dn)
                'Directory.Delete(dn)
            Catch
                MsgBox("invalid path =  " & dn)
                Return False
            End Try
        End If
    End If
    Return True
End Function
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