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it is rather strange, I had thought we should always put high chance clause into the front of nested if-elses, until today.

Brief setup:

an array Zoo[] contains 10,000 objects of 5 classes, based on the weights, e.g. 4,3,2,1,0 (means 4000 Cats, 3000 Dogs, 2000 Chickens, 1000 Rabbits, 0 Owls) and it can either be shuffled or not (exactly in order).

Then Use if-else to check each array members.

Results: Time (ms)

  Weights         43210  01234  22222  43210  01234  22222
  Shuffle         Yes    Yes    Yes    No     No     No
  Polymorphism    101    100    107    26     26     27
  If Else         77     28     59     17     16     17
  If Else Reverse 28     77     59     16     17     16
  Switch          21     21     21     18     19     18

It caught my eye when I see the If-Else reverse is much better than if-else. Here if-else exams Cat->Dog->Chicken->Rabbit->Owl, reversed version checks them in reverse order.

Also, could someone explain in the non shuffle version every method gain great improvement? (I would assume due to cache or better hit rate in memory?)

Update

  Weights         27 9 3 1 0   0 1 3 9 27  27 9 3 1 0  0 1 3 9 27
  Shuffle         Yes          Yes         No          No
  Polymorphism    84           82          27          27
  If Else         61           20          17          16
  If Else Reverse 20           60          16          17
  Switch          21           21          18          18

Code follows:

class Animal : AnimalAction
{
    public virtual int Bart { get; private set; }
    public int Type { get; private set; }
    public Animal(int animalType)
    {
        this.Type = animalType;
    }
}
interface AnimalAction
{
    int Bart { get; }
}

class Cat : Animal
{
    public Cat()
        : base(0)
    {
    }
    public override int Bart
    {
        get
        {
            return 0;
        }
    }
}
class Dog : Animal
{
    public Dog()
        : base(1)
    {
    }
    public override int Bart
    {
        get
        {
            return 1;
        }
    }
}
class Chicken : Animal
{
    public Chicken()
        : base(2)
    {
    }
    public override int Bart
    {
        get
        {
            return 2;
        }
    }
}
class Rabbit : Animal
{
    public Rabbit()
        : base(3)
    {
    }
    public override int Bart
    {
        get
        {
            return 3;
        }
    }
}
class Owl : Animal
{
    public Owl()
        : base(4)
    {
    }
    public override int Bart
    {
        get
        {
            return 4;
        }
    }
}

class SingleDispatch
{
    readonly Animal[] Zoo;
    int totalSession;

    SingleDispatch(int totalSession, int zooSize)
    {
        this.totalSession = totalSession;
        Zoo = new Animal[zooSize];
        int[] weights = new int[5] { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 };
        int totalWeights = weights.Sum();
        int[] tiers = new int[4];
        int accumulated = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        {
            accumulated += weights[i] * zooSize / totalWeights;
            tiers[i] = accumulated;
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < tiers[0]; i++)
        {
            Animal nextAnimal = new Cat();
            Zoo[i] = nextAnimal;
        }
        for (int i = tiers[0]; i < tiers[1]; i++)
        {
            Animal nextAnimal = new Dog();
            Zoo[i] = nextAnimal;
        }
        for (int i = tiers[1]; i < tiers[2]; i++)
        {
            Animal nextAnimal = new Chicken();
            Zoo[i] = nextAnimal;
        }
        for (int i = tiers[2]; i < tiers[3]; i++)
        {
            Animal nextAnimal = new Rabbit();
            Zoo[i] = nextAnimal;
        }
        for (int i = tiers[3]; i < zooSize; i++)
        {
            Animal nextAnimal = new Owl();
            Zoo[i] = nextAnimal;
        }

        Zoo.FisherYatesShuffle();
    }

    public static void Benchmark()
    {
        List<Tuple<string, double>> result = new List<Tuple<string, double>>();
        SingleDispatch myBenchmark = new SingleDispatch(1000, 10000);

        result.Add(TestContainer.RunTests(10, myBenchmark.SubClassPoly));

        result.Add(TestContainer.RunTests(10, myBenchmark.Ifelse));
        result.Add(TestContainer.RunTests(10, myBenchmark.IfelseReverse));

        result.Add(TestContainer.RunTests(10, myBenchmark.Switch));

        foreach (var item in result)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0,-30}{1:N0}", item.Item1, item.Item2);
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
    }

    void SubClassPoly()
    {
        long sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < totalSession; i++)
        {
            foreach (var myAnimal in Zoo)
            {
                sum += myAnimal.Bart;
            }
        }
    }

    void Ifelse()
    {
        long sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < totalSession; i++)
        {
            foreach (var myAnimal in Zoo)
            {
                if (myAnimal.Type == 0)
                {
                    sum += 0;
                }
                else if (myAnimal.Type == 1)
                {
                    sum += 1;
                }
                else if (myAnimal.Type == 2)
                {
                    sum += 2;
                }
                else if (myAnimal.Type == 3)
                {
                    sum += 3;
                }
                else
                {
                    sum += 4;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    void IfelseReverse()
    {
        long sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < totalSession; i++)
        {
            foreach (var myAnimal in Zoo)
            {
                if (myAnimal.Type == 4)
                {
                    sum += 4;
                }
                else if (myAnimal.Type == 3)
                {
                    sum += 3;
                }
                else if (myAnimal.Type == 2)
                {
                    sum += 2;
                }
                else if (myAnimal.Type == 1)
                {
                    sum += 1;
                }
                else
                {
                    sum += 0;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    void Switch()
    {
        long sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < totalSession; i++)
        {
            foreach (var myAnimal in Zoo)
            {
                switch (myAnimal.Type)
                {
                    case 0:
                        sum += 0;
                        break;
                    case 1:
                        sum += 1;
                        break;
                    case 2:
                        sum += 2;
                        break;
                    case 3:
                        sum += 3;
                        break;
                    case 4:
                        sum += 4;
                        break;
                    default:
                        break;
                }
            }
        }
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
IfElse() and IfelseReverse() use different loops. Fix that first. –  Henk Holterman Apr 13 '12 at 14:42
1  
Way too much code for the core question. –  Henk Holterman Apr 13 '12 at 14:42
1  
I suspect your polymorphic code is slower because in all your other examples, you're not invoking the property. –  Matthew Apr 13 '12 at 14:43
    
@HenkHolterman: i don't get ur first comment. "different loops"? for ur second comment, i agree that I have included some non core code, however most of those are very simple. –  colinfang Apr 13 '12 at 14:48
    
@Matthew: I am fine with polymorphic code is slower than if-else/switch counterpart, as it brings some overheads. But seems u r suggesting it can be improved further? –  colinfang Apr 13 '12 at 14:50
show 2 more comments

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

Branch Prediction. http://igoro.com/archive/fast-and-slow-if-statements-branch-prediction-in-modern-processors/

For the non shuffled case it is much easier to understand. Assume we have a very simple predictor that guesses that the next result will be the same as the previous result:

e.g. (c=cat,d=dog,o=owl)

animal: CCCCC DDDDD OOOOO

prediction: *CCCC CDDDD DOOOO

Correct: NYYY NYYY NYYYY

As you can see the predictions are only wrong when the animal changes. So, with a thousand animals of each type the predictor is right over 99% of the time.

But, the predictor doesn't really work that way,

What is really happening** is that each if branch is being predicted to be true or false. Assuming a (40%,30%,20%,10%,0%) distribution like in your example:

if (Animal.Type == MostCommonType) true less than half the time (40%) 40 out of 100 (40+30+20+10+0) else if (animal.Type == SecondMostCommonType) //true 50% of the time, 30 out of 60 (30+20+10 + 0) else if (animal.Type == ThirdMostCommonType) // true 66% of the time 20 out of 30 (20+10) else if (animal.Type == FourtMostCommonType) // true 100% of the time 10 out of 10 (10 +0)

40%, 50%, and 60% odds don't give the predictor much to work with, and the only good prediction (100%) is on the least common type and least common code path.

However, if you reverse the if order:

if (animal.Type == FifthMostCommonType) //False 100% of the time 0 out of 100 (40+30+20+10+0) else if (animal.Type == FourtMostCommonType) //False 90% of the time 10 out of 100 (40+30+20+10) else if (Animal.Type == MostCommonType) //False 77% of the time 20 out of 90 (40+30+20+) else if (animal.Type == SecondMostCommonType) //true 57 % of the time, 30 out of 70 (40+30) else if (animal.Type == ThirdMostCommonType) // true 100% of the time 40 out of 40 (40+)

Nearly all comparisons are highly predicable.

Predicting that the next animal will NOT be the least common animal will be correct more than any other prediction.

In short, the total cost of the missed branch predictions in this case is higher than the cost of doing more branches (i.e. if statements)

I hope that clears it up a little. Please let me know if any parts are unclear, I'll try to clarify.

**well not really really, but much closer to the truth.

Edit:

The branch predictor in newer processor is fairly complex you can see more detail at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branch_predictor#Static_prediction

Shuffling confounds the predictor by removing the groups of similar data and making each guess or prediction likely to be correct. Imagine a brand new deck of cards. A friend picks up each card and asks you to guess if it is red or black.

At this point a fairly good algorithm would be to guess whatever the last card was. You would guess right nearly every time. > 90%

After shuffling the deck however, this algorithm would only give 50% accuracy. In fact no algorithm will give you significantly better than 50%. (as far as I know, counting the number of reds and blacks left is the only way to get an edge in this situation.)

Edit : Re Sub classing

I would guess that this is because of CPU / L1/2/etc cache misses. Since each class implements the return value as a constant i.e. return 0 the return value is part of the function. I suspect if you re implemented the class as shown below you would force a cache miss on every call and see the same (bad) performance shuffled or not.

  class Rabbit : Animal
{
    int bartVal; // using a local int should force a call to memory for each instance of the class
    public Rabbit():base(3)
    {
    bartVal = 3;
    }
    public override int Bart
    {
        get
        {
            return bartVal;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for the excellent explanation. Would you be able also to share some knowledge regarding the fact that shuffled polymorphism runs slow than non-shuffled version. –  colinfang Apr 18 '12 at 21:02
    
Also, you should try experimenting with making one of the animals very common (like 90%) and see how that affects your timings :) –  Jason Hernandez Apr 18 '12 at 23:24
    
This answer is correct. I did a similar benchmark of this some time ago. –  usr Apr 18 '12 at 23:40
    
@JasonHernandez In my comment I mean polymorphism (not if-else) method, which does not use branch Prediction I guess? –  colinfang Apr 18 '12 at 23:48
1  
@Usr: Thanks, It's always nice to have some confirmation. –  Jason Hernandez Apr 18 '12 at 23:58
show 1 more comment

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