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Is there an inexpensive way to concatenate integers in csharp?

Example: 1039 & 7056 = 10397056

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6  
Just a note - many of these (string parsing) solutions can have an OverflowException if the combined string is greater than the max integer value (or lower than the min). –  Ryan Versaw Jun 18 '09 at 18:28
    
Why did I get voted down? –  CountCet Jun 18 '09 at 19:11
    
Because you didn't give any motiviation WHY you would WANT to concatenate numbers? –  Cade Roux Jun 18 '09 at 19:38
2  
What is the concatenation of -1039 and 7056? 1039 and -7056? -1039 and -7056? Concatenation doesn't really make a lot of sense for integers. –  patros Jun 18 '09 at 21:21
1  
Then I hope you're using uints. The question led to some good answers, but using ints (or even uints) as an id is a bit of a code smell. Are all the ID's the same number of digits? If not you risk colliding on things like 1 & 11, 11 and 1 vs 111. –  patros Jun 19 '09 at 16:00
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10 Answers

up vote 31 down vote accepted

If you can find a situation where this is expensive enough to cause any concern, I'll be very impressed:

int a = 1039;
int b = 7056;

int newNumber = int.Parse(a.ToString() + b.ToString())

Or, if you want it to be a little more ".NET-ish":

int newNumber = Convert.ToInt32(string.Format("{0}{1}", a, b));

int.Parse is not an expensive operation. Spend your time worrying about network I/O and O^N regexes.

Other notes: the overhead of instantiating StringBuilder means there's no point if you're only doing a few concatenations. And very importantly - if you are planning to turn this back into an integer, keep in mind it's limited to ~2,000,000,000. Concatenating numbers gets very large very quickly, and possibly well beyond the capacity of a 32-bit int. (signed of course).

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1  
You only need to call .ToString() on one of the integers. –  Brandon Jun 18 '09 at 18:15
    
I agree. This should do the trick. If performance is really important in that part of your code I'd try to profile different solutions to this problem. –  Meta-Knight Jun 18 '09 at 18:16
4  
@Brandon technically true, but the compiler does the same string conversion either way, so it's only saving a few keystrokes at best. –  Rex M Jun 18 '09 at 18:17
    
True, either way +1. :) –  Brandon Jun 18 '09 at 18:18
    
+1: it often surprises me how many people look for micro-optimizations on code like this instead of doing what just works. –  Juliet Jun 18 '09 at 19:29
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  1. string ConcatInt(int x,int y){return String.Format("{0}{1}",x,y);}
    
  2. int ConcatInt(int x,int y){
       return (x * Math.Pow(10, y.length)) + y;
    }
    

Edit Note: Fixes some mistypes. There are more type issues left. I'm just giving an outline of the answer

The second method should actually be:

static int ConcatInt2(int x, int y) {
   return (int)(x * Math.Pow(10, y.ToString().Length)) + y;
}
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#2 seems like it would be faster than a parsing to strings –  tooleb Jun 18 '09 at 18:17
    
Not sure how much faster this second method really is, since you are already parsing one int to string anyway (just to get its length). I think in order for this to be really faster than just concatenating two strings, you should use the "old fashion" approach of determining numbers length. –  David Božjak Jun 18 '09 at 19:46
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inexpensive? String concatenation or formatted string is probably going to be considerably faster.

Otherwise you can do something like:

Math.Pow(10,Math.Ceiling(Math.Log10(second)))*first+second

provided first and second are integers. This is about the only way you'll do it not involving converting to a string and back, but I am extremely doubtful that it will be faster.

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+1 Good call on the Ceiling. –  C. Ross Jun 18 '09 at 19:14
    
I agree, great catch on the Ceiling, and this is just about the only thing I'd be able to believe to be faster than parsing int values to strings and concatenating them. –  David Božjak Jun 18 '09 at 19:51
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If you want to concatenate many ints to a String

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(1039);
sb.Append(7056);
sb.Append(1234);
sb.Append(1235);
....
sb.Append(9999);
sb.ToString();
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I don't think you can get any simpler than this:

static uint Concat (uint a, uint b)
{
  uint
    pow = 1;

  while (pow < b)
  {
    pow = ((pow << 2) + pow) << 1;
    a = ((a << 2) + a) << 1;
  }

  return a + b;
}

which has no memory allocations, string conversions or multiplies; or maybe:

static uint Concat (uint a, uint b)
{
  uint
    pow = 1;

  while (pow < b)
  {
    pow = ((pow << 2) + pow) << 1;
  }

  return a * pow + b;
}

If you want to concatenate two binary numbers:

static uint Concat (uint a, uint b)
{
  uint
    mask = uint.MaxValue;

  while ((mask & b) != 0)
  {
    mask <<= 1;
    a <<= 1;
  }

  return a | b;
}
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4  
Can't get any simpler? I could believe this is the fastest approach, and the shifting is clever, but I'm not sure it deserves the label "simple." ;) –  Doug McClean Jun 18 '09 at 19:29
    
Also, for a really tight loop you would want to profile (or at least disassemble) to see if the JIT reduces-in-strength constant multiplies by 10 to the shift pattern you have here. It might be that "pow *= 10" results in very similar results to "pow = ((pow << 2) + pow) << 1" or even that the multiply is faster for some arcane reason. –  Doug McClean Jun 18 '09 at 19:33
    
Using the "*10" version on IA32, the compiler/JIT might use the intructions: lea eax,[eax*4+eax] ; add eax,eax. It's a long shot though. –  Skizz Jun 19 '09 at 8:21
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If we want integer result then:

int result = int.Parse(input1.ToString() + input2.ToString());

For a string result do this:

string result = input1.ToString() + input2.ToString();
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The "Mathy" and "No String" method follows:

    int a = 1039;
    int b = 7056;

    int bLen = (int)Math.Ceiling(Math.Log10(b));
    int ab = (a * ((int)Math.Pow(10, bLen))) + b;

Note that it may still be slow because of the Log10 call.

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1  
+1 although I'm not 100% convinced that this is faster in practice than string concatenation –  Tamas Czinege Jun 18 '09 at 18:19
    
Honestly, I'm not convinced it is either. But it works and it's probably worth a try. –  C. Ross Jun 18 '09 at 19:02
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how about this?

int c = b;
while(c > 0) {
   a *= 10;
   c /= 10;
}
a += b;
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Not really inpexpensive, but:

string con = string.Format("{0}{1}",int1,int2);

or

string con = int1.ToString() + int2.ToString();

If you use this in a loop, I think I would use Option 1, which uses a StringBuilder internally.

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public int ConcatInts(int int1, int int2)
{
    return (int)(int1 * Math.Pow(10, int2.ToString().Length)) + int2;
}

Edit: Guess I wasn't the first with this solution!

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