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I'm having a problem with arrays and pointers, and although I thin I know what I'm doing wrong I'm unable to find a simple solution.

I have this piece of code:

void faceRotateACW(char *face[CUBE_DIM][CUBE_DIM]){
    char tempFace[CUBE_DIM][CUBE_DIM];
    for (int y=0;y<CUBE_DIM;y++){
        for (int x=0;x<CUBE_DIM;x++){
            tempFace[y][CUBE_DIM-x]=face[x][y];
        }
    }
    for (int a=0;a<CUBE_DIM;a++){
        for (int b=0;b<CUBE_DIM;b++){
            face[a][b]=tempFace[a][b];
        }
    }
}

Now I know that the problem is that I'm trying to assign a char pointer to a char and that is a no-no, but how can I duplicate, then modify the array and push it back into the one passed by reference? How do I get at the values within the array I'm passing into the function?

Ok, all is going well, at least I'm starting to understand the problem better now (thanks folks). I need to give more info though as the way I'm using this function is probably not the best way either, let me clarify.

I define the array as:

char *faces[NUM_FACES][CUBE_DIM][CUBE_DIM]={{{"o","o","o"},{"o","o","o"},{"o","o","o"}},
        {{"o","o","o"},{"o","o","o"},{"o","o","o"}},
        {{"o","o","o"},{"o","o","o"},{"o","o","o"}},
        {{"o","o","o"},{"o","o","o"},{"o","o","o"}},
        {{"o","o","o"},{"o","o","o"},{"o","o","o"}},
        {{"o","o","o"},{"o","o","o"},{"o","o","o"}}}; 

However when I call the function I'm trying to strip off the outer array like so:

 faceRotateACW(faces[currentFace]);

Sorry for mucking you all about folks, It's my first post :)

share|improve this question
    
It's not quite clear what you want to do - do you want to pass an array of arrays (aka matrix) of char-pointers and simply swap these char pointers in your matrix? If so, why do you create a matrix of chars and not a matrix of char-pointers? –  Anthales Apr 13 '12 at 15:26
    
I'm trying to pass in the matrix values, rotate them and replace the values passed in. Am I passing pointers rather than values within the matrix? –  Phil Holden Apr 13 '12 at 15:43
    
The question is what the values actually are. Are the values chars or are they char *s? If they are chars read Johns answer, if they are char *s, read dbaupps and Yakovs answers. Or who am I kidding - read all answers! ;) –  Anthales Apr 13 '12 at 15:45
1  
@PhilHolden - so your argument is 2D array of strings and the signutare is ->void faceRotateACW(char* face[CUBE_DIM][CUBE_DIM]) My solution deals with this case –  Yakov Apr 13 '12 at 16:06

4 Answers 4

Let's start from the top.

In your main function (or whoever calls faceRotateACW), you have an array like

char theFace[CUBE_DIM][CUBE_DIM];

Except when it is the operand of the sizeof or unary & operators, or is a string literal being used to initialize another array in a declaration, an expression of type "N-element array of T" will be converted to / replaced with / "decay" to an expression of type "pointer to T" whose value is the address of the first element of the array.

If you call your function as

rotateFaceACW(theFace);

the expression theFace in the function call will be replaced with an expression of type "pointer to CUBE_DIM-element array of char", or char (*)[CUBE_DIM]. Thus, your function prototype would need to look something like

void rotateFaceACW(char (*face)[CUBE_DIM]) {...}

or

void rotateFaceACW(char face[][CUBE_DIM]) {...}

which in this context is the same thing. You'd treat it as a normal array in the function:

void rotateFaceACW(char (*face)[CUBE_DIM])
{
  char tempFace[CUBE_DIM][CUBE_DIM];
  ...
      tempFace[y][(CUBE_DIM-1)-x] = face[x][y];  // thanks Anthales
  ...
      face[x][y] = tempFace[x][y];

Since face is a pointer to the first element of the array theFace, any changes made in rotateFaceACW will be reflected in theFace.

Since it looks like you're always going to be dealing with NxN matrices whose size is constant (CUBE_DIM), you probably don't need to pass the number of rows explicitly, but in the general case you would need to.

If you wanted to deal with 2D arrays of any number of rows and columns, you'll have to take a different approach, which I won't go into here since it doesn't seem relevant to your issue.

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1  
Adding obligatory comment about writing CUBE_DIM-1-x instead of CUBE_DIM-x. –  Anthales Apr 13 '12 at 15:58
    
@Anthales: Gah, thanks. I'll edit the example code. –  John Bode Apr 13 '12 at 16:07
    
I didn't even see the overflow until I read Yakovs answer, so no credit to me please ;) –  Anthales Apr 13 '12 at 16:08

As I understand you try to transpose "in reverse columns order " the matrix of strings. Following implementation does it in O(1) space and O(CUBE_DIM^2) time

void faceRotateACW(char* face[CUBE_DIM][CUBE_DIM])
{
    for (int i = 0;i< CUBE_DIM;++i) {
        for (int j = i; j<CUBE_DIM;++j) {
            char* tmpFace = face[i][j];
            face[i][j] = face[j][i];
            face[j][i] = tmpFace;
        }
        for (int j = 0;j < CUBE_DIM/2;++j) {
            char* tmpFace = face[i][j];
            face[i][j] = face[i][CUBE_DIM - 1 - j];
            face[i][CUBE_DIM - 1 - j] = tmpFace;
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a much better algorithm to use, but it doesn't actually answer the question, because face is meant to contain just chars not char*s. –  dbaupp Apr 13 '12 at 15:42
    
@dbaupp - so he has to "transpose" the 2D matrix of chars,when he gets a pointer to this matrix? –  Yakov Apr 13 '12 at 15:49
    
I believe so, your code is correct after replacing char* face with char (*face), face with (*face) elsewhere, and char* tmpFace with char tmpFace. –  dbaupp Apr 13 '12 at 15:53
    
Umm, maybe not... yours might be correct as is :) –  dbaupp Apr 13 '12 at 16:05
    
@dbaupp-pls look at his comment - the argument is 2D array of strings –  Yakov Apr 13 '12 at 16:07

You should use pointer array. The syntax will be like this faceRotateACW(char *face[],int cube_dim) then you can access all values in the multi-dimentional array and then change those values.

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As you have defined it, you are passing a CUBE_DIM×CUBE_DIM matrix of pointers to chars, not a pointer to a CUBE_DIM×CUBE_DIM matrix of chars. To fix this, you should use

char (*face)[CUBE_DIM][CUBE_DIM]

to indicate that face is the pointer, rather than the values stored in the array. Once you've done this, the code will no longer compile because face[x][y] (it is char[]) is the wrong type to assign to, and be assigned from, tempFace[_][_] (which is a char).

You can tell this because face[x] dereferences the outer layer of pointers of face (with an offset of x), and so has type char[][]. The [y] now strips off one layer of [] so the type of face[x][y] is char[], not char.

To fix this, we need to get to the array that face points to before we start indexing, i.e. we need to dereference face and then index. That is:

(*face)[x][y]

So the final code is:

void faceRotateACW(char (*face)[CUBE_DIM][CUBE_DIM]){
    char tempFace[CUBE_DIM][CUBE_DIM];
    for (int y=0;y<CUBE_DIM;y++){
        for (int x=0;x<CUBE_DIM;x++){
            tempFace[y][CUBE_DIM-1-x]=(*face)[x][y];
        }
    }
    for (int a=0;a<CUBE_DIM;a++){
        for (int b=0;b<CUBE_DIM;b++){
            (*face)[a][b]=tempFace[a][b];
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
One might add, that a call to this function looks like faceRotateACW(&mat) if mat is declared as char mat[CUBE_DIM][CUBE_DIM]. Also there's an overflow in the first loop; should read CUBE_DIM-1-x –  Anthales Apr 13 '12 at 15:41

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