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I need a C# .NET function to evaluate whether a typed or scanned barcode is a valid Global Trade Item Number (UPC or EAN).

barcode check digit

The last digit of a bar code number is a computer Check Digit which makes sure the bar code is correctly composed. GTIN Check Digit Calculator

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What have you tried? –  Guffa Apr 13 '12 at 15:21
1  
@Zack I assume you have an answer by now, but I would like to point out that if your system intends to deal with the ISBN-10 codes (which will eventually go away as older books fall off the market) you need to include a check for this. Your question is specific to GTIN, but ISBN-10 can be converted to ISBN-13 which is equivalent to EAN / GTIN-13. Why: ISBN-10 is modulo 11 and as such uses the letter 'X' as a possible check digit to represent the number 10. Only looking for numbers would fail here, unless you convert to ISBN-13 first. –  Zack Jannsen Apr 25 '13 at 11:15
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8 Answers

public static bool IsValidGtin(string code)
{
    if (code != (new Regex("[^0-9]")).Replace(code, ""))
    {
        // is not numeric
        return false;
    }
    // pad with zeros to lengthen to 14 digits
    switch (code.Length)
    {
        case 8:
            code = "000000" + code;
            break;
        case 12:
            code = "00" + code;
            break;
        case 13:
            code = "0" + code;
            break;
        case 14:
            break;
        default:
            // wrong number of digits
            return false;
    }
    // calculate check digit
    int[] a = new int[13];
    a[0] = int.Parse(code[0].ToString()) * 3;
    a[1] = int.Parse(code[1].ToString());
    a[2] = int.Parse(code[2].ToString()) * 3;
    a[3] = int.Parse(code[3].ToString());
    a[4] = int.Parse(code[4].ToString()) * 3;
    a[5] = int.Parse(code[5].ToString());
    a[6] = int.Parse(code[6].ToString()) * 3;
    a[7] = int.Parse(code[7].ToString());
    a[8] = int.Parse(code[8].ToString()) * 3;
    a[9] = int.Parse(code[9].ToString());
    a[10] = int.Parse(code[10].ToString()) * 3;
    a[11] = int.Parse(code[11].ToString());
    a[12] = int.Parse(code[12].ToString()) * 3;
    int sum = a[0] + a[1] + a[2] + a[3] + a[4] + a[5] + a[6] + a[7] + a[8] + a[9] + a[10] + a[11] + a[12];
    int check = (10 - (sum % 10)) % 10;
    // evaluate check digit
    int last = int.Parse(code[13].ToString());
    return check == last;
}
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Right, the last digit in UPC codes is a "modulo check" digit. A really approachable explanation of this can be found in Petzold's book Code. –  ybakos Apr 13 '12 at 15:22
    
I hope you don't intend to scan an ISBN-10 barcode on this system (books used this in the past before ISBN-13). ISBN-10 is modulo 11. I can have a letter 'X' as a check digit to represent the number 10. Possible Solution: either convert to ISBN-13 first (equivalent to EAN-13 / GTIN-13). –  Zack Jannsen Apr 25 '13 at 11:23
    
NOTE: ISBN-10 was replaced January 1, 2007 by ISBN-13. That does not mean that the books on currently on the shelf will not carry both codes (backward compatibility). If this system has a human entry interface and has any chance of dealing with books you will want to safeguard against them picking the ISBN-10 code. –  Zack Jannsen Apr 25 '13 at 11:35
    
The conversion from ISBN-10 to EAN-13 is possible by adding 978 to the front of the number. NOTE: 978 and 979 are designated for ISBN ranges and 979 will not be used until 978 is used up. 979, however, will not carry a 10 digit counterpart so you are safe to build code that takes a 10 digit ISBN by adding 978. Just note you will need to calculate the check digit for the new number based on GTIN-13 modulus 10 rules. –  Zack Jannsen Apr 25 '13 at 13:15
    
A bit cumbersome approach. Using a single loop would work better, in my opinion –  ThunderGr Sep 26 '13 at 6:48
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GS1 US publishes the check digit calculation algorithm for GTIN in a PDF document (removed the constantly changing link).

The following code uses linq to check the last digit for GTIN barcodes: GTIN-8, GTIN-12 (UPC), GTIN-13 (EAN) and GTIN-14 (ITF-14).

private static Regex _gtinRegex = new System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex("^(\\d{8}|\\d{12,14})$");
public static bool IsValidGtin(string code)
{
    if (!(_gtinRegex.IsMatch(code))) return false; // check if all digits and with 8, 12, 13 or 14 digits
    code = code.PadLeft(14, '0'); // stuff zeros at start to garantee 14 digits
    int[] mult = Enumerable.Range(0, 13).Select(i => int.Parse(code[i].ToString()) * ((i % 2 == 0) ? 3 : 1)).ToArray(); // STEP 1: without check digit, "Multiply value of each position" by 3 or 1
    int sum = mult.Sum(); // STEP 2: "Add results together to create sum"
    return (10 - (sum % 10)) % 10 == int.Parse(code[13].ToString()); // STEP 3 Equivalent to "Subtract the sum from the nearest equal or higher multiple of ten = CHECK DIGIT"
}
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Variable length EANs

    public static bool IsValidEan13(string eanBarcode)
    {
        return IsValidEan(eanBarcode, 13);
    }

    public static bool IsValidEan12(string eanBarcode)
    {
        return IsValidEan(eanBarcode, 12);
    }

    public static bool IsValidEan14(string eanBarcode)
    {
        return IsValidEan(eanBarcode, 14);
    }

    public static bool IsValidEan8(string eanBarcode)
    {
        return IsValidEan(eanBarcode, 8);
    }

    private static bool IsValidEan(string eanBarcode, int length)
    {
        if (eanBarcode.Length != length) return false;
        var allDigits = eanBarcode.Select(c => int.Parse(c.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture))).ToArray();
        var s = length%2 == 0 ? 3 : 1;
        var s2 = s == 3 ? 1 : 3;
        return allDigits.Last() == (10 - (allDigits.Take(length-1).Select((c, ci) => c*(ci%2 == 0 ? s : s2)).Sum()%10))%10;
    }

    [Test]
    [TestCaseSource("Ean_13_TestCases")]
    public void Check_Ean13_Is_Valid(string ean, bool isValid)
    {
        BlinkBuilder.IsValidEan13(ean).Should().Be(isValid);
    }

    private static IEnumerable<object[]> Ean_13_TestCases()
    {
        yield return new object[] { "9781118143308", true };
        yield return new object[] { "978111814330", false };
        yield return new object[] { "97811181433081", false };
        yield return new object[] { "5017188883399", true };
    }

    [Test]
    [TestCaseSource("Ean_8_TestCases")]
    public void Check_Ean8_Is_Valid(string ean, bool isValid)
    {
        BlinkBuilder.IsValidEan8(ean).Should().Be(isValid);
    }

    private static IEnumerable<object[]> Ean_8_TestCases()
    {
        yield return new object[] { "12345670", true };
        yield return new object[] { "12345679", false };
        yield return new object[] { "55432214", true  };
        yield return new object[] { "55432213", false };
        yield return new object[] { "55432215", false };
    }

EDIT

The project I was building this code for is now up and running - it's part of a comprehensive barcode database and toolset - and includes a bulk barcode validator (100 in a batch for non-reg users, 10,000 for registered) - https://blinked.in/tools/validator

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/// <summary>
/// Validates a GTIN (UPC/EAN) using the terminating check digit
/// </summary>
/// <param name="code">the string representing the GTIN</param>
/// <returns>True if the check digit matches, false if the code is not 
/// parsable as a GTIN or the check digit does not match</returns>
public static bool IsValidGtin(string code)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(code))
        return false;
    if (code.Length != 8 && code.Length != 12 && code.Length != 13 
        && code.Length != 14)
        // wrong number of digits
        return false;

    int sum = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < code.Length - 1 /* do not include check char */; i++)
    {
        if (!char.IsNumber(code[i]))
            return false;

        var cchari = (int)char.GetNumericValue(code[i]);
        // even (from the right) characters get multiplied by 3
        // add the length to align right
        if ((code.Length + i) % 2 == 0)
            sum += cchari * 3;
        else
            sum += cchari;
    }

    // validate check char
    char checkChar = code[code.Length - 1];
    if (!char.IsNumber(checkChar))
        return false;

    int checkChari = (int)char.GetNumericValue(checkChar);
    return checkChari == (10 - (sum % 10)) % 10;
}

Test cases:

    [TestMethod()]
    public void IsValidGtinTest_Valid()
    {
        string[] valid = new[] {
            "085126880552",
            "0085126880552",
            "00085126880552",
            "0786936226355",
            "0719852136552"
        };
        foreach (var upc in valid)
            Assert.IsTrue(IdentifierUtilities.IsValidGtin(upc), upc);
    }

    [TestMethod()]
    public void IsValidGtinTest_Invalid()
    {
        string[] invalid = new[] {
            "0058126880552",
            "58126880552",
            "0786936223655",
            "0719853136552",
            "",
            "00",
            null,
            "123456789123456789123456789",
            "1111111111111"
        };
        foreach (var upc in invalid)
            Assert.IsFalse(IdentifierUtilities.IsValidGtin(upc), upc);
    }
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    private bool ValidateCheckDigit()
    {

        Int32 _num = 0;
        Int32 _checkdigit = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < CurrentUpcInfo.UpcCode.Length; i++)
        {
            if (i % 2 == 0)
            {
                _num += (3 * Convert.ToInt32(CurrentUpcInfo.UpcCode.Substring(i, 1)));
            }
            else
            {
                _num += Convert.ToInt32(CurrentUpcInfo.UpcCode.Substring(i, 1));
            }

        }
        _num = Math.Abs(_num) + 10;  // in case num is a zero
        _checkdigit = (10 - (_num % 10)) % 10;


        if (Convert.ToInt32(CurrentUpcInfo.Checkdigit) == _checkdigit)
            return true;

        return false;

    }
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The solutions above calculate the check digit and compare it to the given digit, ignoring the fact that it is designed to be validated in a much simpler way.

  1. Multiply all digits, including check digit, by 3 or 1 and sum.
  2. Check if the sum is a multiple of 10

Based on Luciano's answer:

private static Regex _gtinRegex = new Regex("^(\\d{8}|\\d{12,14})$");
public static bool IsValidGtin(string code)
{
    if (!(_gtinRegex.IsMatch(code))) return false;
    code = code.PadLeft(14, '0');
    int sum = code.Select((c,i) => (c - '0')  * ((i % 2 == 0) ? 3 : 1)).Sum();
    return (sum % 10) == 0;
}
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I had a similar problem and google brought me to this page. I needed to calculate the check digit for a large number of barcodes for a label generating program. I first started with a variation of Luciano Carvalho's answer above, but I was a little curious of the casting of the string to a char to an int. I suspected I might be able improve the performance a bit.

Please note that validating is happening outside of this function. This function is built more for speed since I am generating a large number of barcodes.

int CalculateCheckDigit(ulong label)
{
    int sum = 0;
    bool isEven=true;
    while(label>0)
    {
        if(isEven)
            sum += (int)(label % 10) * 3;
        else
            sum += (int)(label % 10) * 1;
        isEven = !isEven;
        label /= 10;
    }

    return (10 - (sum % 10)) % 10;
}
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private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string code = textBox1.Text;
    string sBarcode = string.Empty;
    sBarcode = IsValidGtin(code);
    lblBarCode.Text = sBarcode;
}
public static string IsValidGtin(string code)
{

    //if (code != (new Regex("[^0-9]")).Replace(code, ""))
    //{
    //    // is not numeric
    //    return false;
    //}
    // pad with zeros to lengthen to 14 digits
    switch (code.Length)
    {
        case 2:
            code = code + "000000000";
            break;
        case 3:
            code = code + "00000000";
            break;
        case 4:
            code = code + "0000000";
            break;
        case 5:
            code = code + "000000";
            break;
        case 6:
            code = code + "00000";
            break;
        case 7:
            code = code + "0000";
            break;
        case 8:
            code = code + "000";
            break;
        case 9:
            code = code + "00";
            break;
        case 10:
            code = code + "0";
            break;
        case 11:
            break;
        case 12:
            code = code.Substring(0, 11);
            break;
        //default:
        // wrong number of digits
        //  return false;
    }
    // calculate check digit
    int[] a = new int[12];
    a[0] = int.Parse(code[0].ToString()) * 3;
    a[1] = int.Parse(code[1].ToString());
    a[2] = int.Parse(code[2].ToString()) * 3;
    a[3] = int.Parse(code[3].ToString());
    a[4] = int.Parse(code[4].ToString()) * 3;
    a[5] = int.Parse(code[5].ToString());
    a[6] = int.Parse(code[6].ToString()) * 3;
    a[7] = int.Parse(code[7].ToString());
    a[8] = int.Parse(code[8].ToString()) * 3;
    a[9] = int.Parse(code[9].ToString());
    a[10] = int.Parse(code[10].ToString()) * 3;
    //a[11] = int.Parse(code[11].ToString());
    //a[12] = int.Parse(code[12].ToString()) * 3;
    int sum = a[0] + a[1] + a[2] + a[3] + a[4] + a[5] + a[6] + a[7] + a[8] + a[9] + a[10];
    string check = Convert.ToString((10 - (sum % 10)));
    // evaluate check digit
    // int last = int.Parse(code[13].ToString());
    // return check == last;
    code = code + check;
    return code;
}
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3  
dear god what is this abomination... –  surjikal Feb 6 '13 at 0:24
1  
This code is a very poor approach to the solution of the problem. It could only be used if the programmer does not have access to loop structures, for some reason. The comment "pad with zeros to lengthen to 14 digits" is inconsistent with the code that pads to 11 and, the bulk of EAN codes is expected to have 13 digits, anyway. I do not know what @Adi Lester edited but this code does not provide a correct solution to the problem. –  ThunderGr Sep 26 '13 at 6:20
    
@ThunderGr I merely fixed the answer's formatting. You can see the revision history by clicking the "edited..." link –  Adi Lester Sep 26 '13 at 9:53
    
This code should be submitted to "DailyWTF" :) –  Sam Jul 4 at 11:33
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