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What is the most efficient way given to raise an integer to the power of another integer in C?

// 2^3
pow(2,3) == 8

// 5^5
pow(5,5) == 3125
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When you say "efficiency," you need to specify efficient in relation to what. Speed? Memory usage? Code size? Maintainability? –  Andy Lester Oct 2 '08 at 17:26
    
Doesn't C have a pow() function? –  jalf May 30 '09 at 13:07
5  
yes, but that works on floats or doubles, not on ints –  Nathan Fellman May 30 '09 at 13:46
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13 Answers 13

up vote 154 down vote accepted

Exponentiation by squaring.

int ipow(int base, int exp)
{
    int result = 1;
    while (exp)
    {
        if (exp & 1)
            result *= base;
        exp >>= 1;
        base *= base;
    }

    return result;
}

This is the standard method for doing modular exponentiation for huge numbers in asymmetric cryptography.

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With maybe break-out special cases for small exponents known to have better algorithms: turns out the questioner doesn't expect overflow anyway, so these are presumably common. –  Steve Jessop Sep 19 '08 at 13:18
1  
Thanks for the code Elias. I beautified the code a bit for better presentation. –  Ashwin May 30 '09 at 12:58
9  
You should probably add a check that "exp" isn't negative. Currently, this function will either give a wrong answer or loop forever. (Depending on whether >>= on a signed int does zero-padding or sign-extension - C compilers are allowed to pick either behaviour). –  user9876 Jul 28 '09 at 16:42
6  
I wrote a more optimized version of this, freely downloadable here: gist.github.com/3551590 On my machine it was about 2.5x faster. –  nightcracker Aug 31 '12 at 11:18
6  
@AkhilJain: It's perfectly good C; to make it valid also in Java, replace while (exp) and if (exp & 1) with while (exp != 0) and if ((exp & 1) != 0) respectively. –  Ilmari Karonen Apr 8 '13 at 16:38
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Note that exponentiation by squaring is not the most optimal method. It is probably the best you can do as a general method that works for all exponent values, but for a specific exponent value there might be a better sequence that needs fewer multiplications.

For instance, if you want to compute x^15, the method of exponentiation by squaring will give you:

x^15 = (x^7)*(x^7)*x 
x^7 = (x^3)*(x^3)*x 
x^3 = x*x*x

This is a total of 6 multiplications.

It turns out this can be done using "just" 5 multiplications.

n*n = n^2
n^2*n = n^3
n^3*n^3 = n^6
n^6*n^6 = n^12
n^12*n^3 = n^15

I don't remember the source now, but I vaguely remember that there are no efficient algorithms to find this optimal sequence of multiplications.

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@JeremySalwen: As this answer states, binary exponentiation is not in general the most optimal method. There are no efficient algorithms currently known for finding the minimal sequence of multiplications. –  Eric Postpischil Dec 27 '13 at 21:32
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Exponentiation by squaring might be worth taking a look at.

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Here is the method in Java

private int ipow(int base, int exp)
{
    int result = 1;
    while (exp != 0)
    {
        if ((exp & 1) == 1)
            result *= base;
        exp >>= 1;
        base *= base;
    }

    return result;
}
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An extremly specialized case is, when you need say 2^(-x to y), where x, is of course is negative and y is too large to do shifting on an int. You can still do 2^x in constant time by screwing with a float.

struct IeeeFloat
{

    unsigned int base : 23;
    unsigned int exponent : 8;
    unsigned int signBit : 1;
};


union IeeeFloatUnion
{
    IeeeFloat brokenOut;
    float f;
};

inline float twoToThe(char exponent)
{
    // notice how the range checking is already done on the exponent var 
    static IeeeFloatUnion u;
    u.f = 2.0;
    // Change the exponent part of the float
    u.brokenOut.exponent += (exponent - 1);
    return (u.f);
}

You can get more powers of 2 by using a double as the base type. (Thanks a lot to commenters for helping to square this post away).

There's also the possibility that learning more about Ieee floats, other special cases of exponentiation might present themselves.

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Nifty solution, but unsigend?? –  paxdiablo Sep 19 '08 at 12:37
    
Yeah, my bad. :) thanks for pointing it out. –  Doug T. Sep 19 '08 at 12:39
    
An IEEE float is base x 2 ^ exp, changing the exponent value won't lead to anything else than a multiplication by a power of two, and chances are high it will denormalize the float ... your solution is wrong IMHO –  Drealmer Sep 19 '08 at 12:50
    
*= won't work either, exponent can be null –  Drealmer Sep 19 '08 at 12:55
2  
Base 10? Uh no, it's base 2, unless you meant 10 in binary :) –  Drealmer Sep 19 '08 at 13:02
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Just as a follow up to comments on the efficiency of exponentiation by squaring.

The advantage of that approach is that it runs in log(n) time. For example, if you were going to calculate something huge, such as x^1048575 (2^20 - 1), you only have to go thru the loop 20 times, not 1 million+ using the naive approach.

Also, in terms of code complexity, it is simpler than trying to find the most optimal sequence of multiplications, a la Pramod's suggestion.

Edit:

I guess I should clarify before someone tags me for the potential for overflow. This approach assumes that you have some sort of hugeint library.

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If you need to raise 2 to a power. The fastest way to do so is to bit shift by the power.

2 ** 3 == 1 << 3 == 8
2 ** 30 == 1 << 30 == 1073741824 (A Gigabyte)
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Is there an elegant way to do this so that 2 ** 0 == 1 ? –  Rob Smallshire Nov 23 '11 at 21:39
3  
2 ** 0 == 1 << 0 == 1 –  Jake Dec 30 '11 at 18:22
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int pow( int base, int exponent)
{
    if (exponent == 0) return 1;  // base case;
    int temp = pow(base, exponent/2);
    if (exponent % 2 == 0)
        return temp * temp; 
    else
        return (base * temp * temp);
}
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If you want to get the value of an integer for 2 raised to the power of something it is always better to use the shift option:

pow(2,5) can be replaced by 1<<5

This is much more efficient.

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As I recall, math.h contains a pow(x, y) function

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yeah but this one works with doubles –  Drealmer Sep 19 '08 at 12:34
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One more implementation (in Java). May not be most efficient solution but # of iterations is same as that of Exponential solution.

public static long pow(long base, long exp){        
    if(exp ==0){
        return 1;
    }
    if(exp ==1){
        return base;
    }

    if(exp % 2 == 0){
        long half = pow(base, exp/2);
        return half * half;
    }else{
        long half = pow(base, (exp -1)/2);
        return base * half * half;
    }       
}
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more generic solution considering negative exponenet

private static float pow(int base, int exponent) {
    System.out.println("exp: " + exponent);
    long result = 1L;
    if (exponent == 0)
        return result; // base case;

    if (exponent < 0)
        return 1 / pow(base, -exponent);
    float temp = pow(base, exponent / 2);
    if (exponent % 2 == 0)
        return temp * temp;
    else
        return (base * temp * temp);
}
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Ignoring the special case of 2 raised to a power, the most efficient way is going to be simple iteration.

int pow(int base, int pow) {
  int res = 1;
  for(int i=pow; i<pow; i++)
    res *= base;

  return res;
}

EDIT: As has been pointed out this is not the most efficient way... so long as you define efficiency as cpu cycles which I guess is fair enough.

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O(N) where O(log N) is possible - see yarrkov –  MSalters Sep 19 '08 at 13:06
    
This could actually be the most efficient. N can't be arbitrarily large. Its maximum is either 31 or 63 (depending on your int size). Its like how insertion sort beats quicksort for low N. –  paperhorse Sep 27 '08 at 22:01
    
This code doesn't work as written, i should be initialized to 0 not pow. @paperhorse, N is pow, ie 0 to INT_MAX. –  Greg Rogers Oct 11 '08 at 13:54
    
i=pow; i<pow; i++, i is already intialised to pow and then iterating to pow, the loop will run only once, you should decrement i. isn't it? –  Akhil Jain Dec 16 '12 at 5:55
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