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I've got a Maven plugin that depends on slf4j for logging. The default behavior is too chatty for my liking but I can't figure out how to add my logback.xml to the plugin's classpath.

<plugin>
  <dependencies>
  </dependencies>
</plugin>

allows you to add dependencies to the plugin's classpath, but how do you add local (resource) directories?

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Can you tell us which plugin? –  khmarbaise Apr 13 '12 at 17:43
    
@khmarbaise: It shouldn't matter, but in my case it's jooq.org –  Gili Apr 13 '12 at 18:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have to wrap your logback.xml into a proper Maven artifact (i.e. a jar) and install it to local repository or deploy to your shared repository, or use systemPath in your dependency declaration to point to a jar placed somewhere inside of your project, which is highly not recommended.

The reason for this is reusability of your build. Think how others would be able to reproduce it.

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Are you honesty telling me that I need to create an entire artifact to contain logback.xml? There would be not reusability problem if I was allowed to add the project's resources directory to the plugin's classpath. –  Gili Apr 13 '12 at 16:05
    
It will take you less then a minute to create a jar with your logback.xml in it. There are a lot of happening in Maven under the hood, so adding project folders to plugin classpath is not exactly fit into the Maven plugin model. Unlike a folder, an artifact is a versioned entity, maybe it is unimportant in your case, but it is critical for an overall Maven's plugin classpath resolution. –  Eugene Kuleshov Apr 13 '12 at 19:32

You don't. You must package them up as an artifact and add it as a dependency.

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