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After creating .NET assemblies in SQL Server 2005, is there anything I need to do when .NET service packs/bug fixes are released by MS and then installed via the usual Microsoft Updates? Is the SQL Assembly a link to the original .NET .dll or does SQL Server take its own private copy?

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After creating .NET assemblies in SQL Server 2005, is there anything I need to do when .NET service packs/bug fixes are released by MS and then installed via the usual Microsoft Updates?

It depends. SQL Server CLR Integration does not support every .NET assembly see Support policy for untested .NET Framework assemblies in the SQL Server CLR-hosted environment. If you limit yourself to supported assemblies (below) then you don't have to do anything.

  • Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll
  • Mscorlib.dll
  • System.Data.dll
  • System.dll
  • System.Xml.dll
  • Microsoft.VisualC.dll
  • CustomMarshalers.dll
  • System.Security.dll
  • System.Web.Services.dll
  • System.Data.SqlXml.dll
  • System.Transactions.dll
  • System.Data.OracleClient.dll
  • System.Configuration.dll

If however you reference an untested assembly you may get an error because

When the CLR loads an assembly, the CLR verifies that the same assembly is in the GAC. If the same assembly is in the GAC, the CLR verifies that the Module Version IDs (MVIDs) of these assemblies match. If the MVIDs of these assemblies do not match, you receive the error message that the "Symptoms" section mentions.

When an assembly is recompiled, the MVID of the assembly changes. Therefore, if you update the .NET Framework, the .NET Framework assemblies have different MVIDs because those assemblies are recompiled. Additionally, if you update your own assembly, the assembly is recompiled. Therefore, the assembly also has a different MVID.

From Error message when you execute a CLR routine or use an assembly in SQL Server 2005: "Assembly in host store has a different signature than assembly in GAC. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131050)" http://support.microsoft.com/kb/949080

If you do encounter this all you need to do is use the ALTER ASSEMBLY Statement to repoint to the new assembly

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I am definitely using some unsupported .NET assemblies. (I wrote a CLR Trigger to print on record insertion, using WPF printing.) –  Conrad Apr 13 '12 at 19:27

is there anything I need to do when .NET service packs/bug fixes are released by MS and then installed via the usual Microsoft Updates?

No. Fixes are usually applied to the runtime itself, so you don't need to rebuild your assemblies or anything.

Is the SQL Assembly a link to the original .NET .dll or does SQL Server take its own private copy?

SQL Server keeps copies for itself that you can see in the sys.assembly_files view.

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