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I have this 2 interfaces:

public interface Attribute<N> {

    Class<N> getAttributeType();
}

public interface FieldSubscriber<N> {

    void notifySubscriber(N value);
}

now I have a FieldRelationsManager class that will handler different kinds of Fields relations, for example it will provides a subscription feature where a FieldSubscriber could subscribe to be informed of the value change of some value holder. So the manager will need a list of FieldSubscribers for a given attribute in order to know which subcriptions it has to notify. So FieldRelationsManager looks like:

public class FieldRelationsManager {

    private Map<Attribute<?>, List<FieldSubscriber<?>>> subscribers;
    .....
    .....
}

in order to assure that the client of the manager provides a FieldSubscriptor to the attribute for the same N, I'm trying to provide a method like:

public <N> void subscribe(Attribute<N> attr, FieldSubscriber<N> subscriber){

    if(subscribers==null){
       subscribers=new HashMap<Attribute<?>, List<FieldSubscriber<?>>>();
    }
    List<FieldSubscriber<N>> list=subscribers.get(attr);
    ....
    ....
}

This will not compile because: subscribers.get(attr); returns:

 List<FieldSubscriber<?>> 

and can not be cast to:

List<FieldSubscriber<N>>

so the question is, are there any other way I could code this in order to assure that N parameter would be the same?

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2  
When using generics in Java, type information is erased and unavailable at runtime. There's no elegant way of getting around this. If you really need the type info, you have to explicitly require the client code to pass a Class argument. –  jpm Apr 13 '12 at 17:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Java generics info are used only at compilation time. Then once the program runs Java works with a List of Objects.

So define your method like this, using <N>, without any problem

public <N> void subscribe(Attribute<N> attr, FieldSubscriber<N> subscriber) {

In this way, you can be sure that compiler, at compilation time, checks that in your code the method is always called with both N type arguments.

But inside the method work with the list, using <?>

List<FieldSubscriber<?>> list = subscribers.get(attr);
if (list == null) {
  list = new ArrayList<FieldSubscriber<?>>();
  subscribers.put(attr, list);
}
list.add(subscriber);

Once within the method you can work and be sure that the arguments are of the type that you desire.

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You could try:

public <N extends Iface> void subscribe(Attribute<N> attr,
    FieldSubscriber<N> subscriber)
{
  if(subscribers==null){       
    subscribers=new HashMap<Attribute<? extends Iface>,
      List<FieldSubscriber<? extends Iface>>>();       
  }       
  List<FieldSubscriber<? extends Iface>> list=subscribers.get(attr);
  list.add(subscriber);
  ....       
  ....       
}

public interface Attribute<N> {  
  Class<N> getAttributeType();  
}  

public interface FieldSubscriber<N> {  
  void notifySubscriber(N value);  
}  

public class FieldRelationsManager {   
  private Map<Attribute<? extends Iface>,
      List<FieldSubscriber<? extends Iface>>> subscribers;   
  .....   
  .....   
} 
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