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Currently, I'm stuck with some code like fooA() (don't mind the body) which expects a specific container, say vector<double>, as argument.

double fooA(std::vector<double> const& list)
{
    return list[0];
}

Now, I want to generalize and use iterators instead:

template<typename InputIterator>
double fooB(InputIterator first, InputIterator last)
{
    return *first;
}

How to state that fooB() requires the iterator to iterate over double?

Someone might pass a vector<string>::iterator or, even worse as it might compile without a warning, a vector<int>::iterator.

share|improve this question
    
Maybe you mean that you need to indicate the iterator is required to iterate over double? –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 13 '12 at 17:18
    
Heh, this can be done, but it's not pretty. I recommend just putting in a comment, since the return type will force that it the iterator type at least converts to a double anyways. –  Mooing Duck Apr 13 '12 at 17:23
    
double instead of int of course. I corrected that, thanks. My "real world return type" does not depend on the iterator... –  Julian Prclôs Apr 13 '12 at 17:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For C++03:

#include <iterator>
#include <boost/type_traits/is_same.hpp>
#include <boost/type_traits/remove_cv.hpp>
#include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>

template<typename InputIterator>
typename boost::enable_if<
    boost::is_same<
        typename boost::remove_cv<
            typename std::iterator_traits<InputIterator>::value_type
        >::type,
        double // expected value_type
    >,
    double     // fooB return type
>::type
fooB(InputIterator first, InputIterator last)
{
    return *first;
}

Another C++03 solution which doesn't use Boost, but will likely produce much uglier errors when passing an invalid type:

#include <iterator>

void fooB_helper(double) { }
template<typename T> void fooB_helper(T const&);

template<typename InputIterator>
double fooB(InputIterator first, InputIterator last)
{
    fooB_helper(typename std::iterator_traits<InputIterator>::value_type());
    return *first;
}

For C++11 you can use expression SFINAE instead of enable_if, or you can use static_assert instead of SFINAE altogether.

share|improve this answer

If you don't want to use Boost/C++11, you might be able to get away with this approach:

template<typename B, template<typename A1, typename B1> class Container>
double fooB(typename Container<int, B>::iterator first,
   typename Container<int, B>::iterator last)
{
  return 0;
}

to call:

vector<int> a;
fooB<vector<int>::allocator_type, vector>(a.begin(), a.end());

A bit ugly, but works :)

Also: non-portable as the std collection implementations canhave more than two template parameters (the second one is an allocator with a default value)

share|improve this answer
    
The stdlib collections have at least two template arguments, but they are allowed to have more as long as the additional ones have defaults. I.e., this code is not portable. –  ildjarn Apr 13 '12 at 17:20

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