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I have a complex number class where I am trying to implement a function to work out the modulus (which requires the used of a sqrt).

My header file is as follows:

#ifndef MY_CLASS_H
#define MY_CLASS_H

template <class T> class complex
{
    // function to overload operator<< a friend
    template <class T>
    friend std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream &os, const complex<T> &z);
private:
    T re,im;
public:

    // Constructors & destructor
    complex(){re=im=0;}
    complex( const T& r, const T& i ) : re(r), im(i) {}
    ~complex(){}

    // Return real component
    T realcomp() const {return re;}
    // Return imaginary component
    T imagcomp() const {return im;}
    // Return modulus
    double modulus() {return sqrt(im*im + re*re);}

etc....

The compiler outputs the error:

error C2668: 'sqrt' : ambiguous call to overloaded function
 could be 'long double sqrt(long double)'
 or       'float sqrt(float)'
 or       'double sqrt(double)'

which I know is telling me that the sqrt needs to know what type of data it is passing through it.

For my program, im and re will take either double or int values.

Am I right in saying sqrt will only take floating values? If so how do I force im and re to floating points without a 'loss of data' warning. Can I do this without converting them?

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1  
you do know there is a complex type in c++ right? –  KillianDS Apr 13 '12 at 17:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, sqrt generally does not take floats. What it takes depends a on your libraries. In your case, you have several overloaded sqrt functions, one takes float, one takes double, and one takes long double.

The problem you have, is none of them take int, and there are multiple conversions from int to a type that you could be used, so the compiler makes you choose (by casting). If you are only using double or int, then cast to double -- there will be no loss of presision. If you want to use long double at some point, cast to that.

double modulus() {return sqrt((double)im*im + re*re);}
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I would actually change it to sqrt((double)(imim + rere)), that way if the template type is int, you are actually doing an integer multiply for both sides instead. You already have to do one explicit cast, so you might as well do it for the result if the numerical type is integer so that you can reap the benefits of the faster integer arithmetic. –  dusktreader Apr 13 '12 at 17:41
    
@dusktreader - I'd change it to (double)im*im + (double)re*re -- im*im can overflow an int. –  Robᵩ Apr 13 '12 at 17:42
    
According to the C++03 standard, sqrt should only take double. You need std::sqrt to access the overloads. In practice, it does vary largely, however. –  James Kanze Apr 13 '12 at 17:47
    
Thanks for pointing that out, the cast should be changed -- either sqrt((double)(imim + rere)) or sqrt((double)imim + (double)rere). The first keeps as much integer math as possible, the second is slower, but keeps as much precision as possible. –  user1332054 Apr 13 '12 at 17:55

There are several solutions, but first, there is a problem with your code: where does the function sqrt come from. If the user includes <sqrt.h>, then you should get only the double version, and no ambiguities. If the user includes <csqrt>, then in pre C++11, the code shouldn't find any sqrt; in practice, no compiler implemented this correctly, and what you get depends on the implementation.

The safest solution is to declare a special namespace of your own, include <csqrt>, define the sqrt you need in it, using std::sqrt in their implementation, and call the sqrt in your namespace:

#include <csqrt>

namespace SafetyFirst
{
    inline int
    sqrt( int in )
    {
        return static_cast<int>( std::sqrt( static_cast<double>( in ) ) );
    }

    inline double
    sqrt( double in )
    {
        return std::sqrt( in ) ;
    }

    //  And so on for any other types you might need.  The
    //  standard provides std::sqrt for the floating point
    //  types only.
}

This way, overload resolution will always find an exact match, and you determine exactly which function you actually want. And you have a way for clients to define new numeric types which might be usable: they just have to define their sqrt in the same namespace, probably forwarding to an implementation in the same namespace as the type.

Alternatively, you can do:

#include <cmath>    // To ensure getting a fixed set of overloads
using std::sqrt;

inline int
sqrt( int in )
{
    return static_cast<int>( std::sqrt( static_cast<double>( in ) ) );
}

//  And so on for any standard integral types you want...
//  And your class here...

For client defined types, ADL will ensure that the compiler looks in the correct namespace, so they don't have to provide a forwarding function in your namespace.

This is actually a fairly nice solution, except that it could screw up client code not expecting to find std::sqrt( float ) in the global namespace. (Such code isn't portable, but it could exist on some platforms.)

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Try this:

double modulus() {return sqrt((double)im*im + re*re);}

You'll always invoke double sqrt(double) this way, but that's probably ok, given your description.

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I'd probably go with long double instead, just to be safe. –  Mooing Duck Apr 13 '12 at 17:31

The problem is caused by ambigues input of the function call of sqrt. The sqrt function has different input parameter (overloaded function) either float or double.

I have quite similar problem : in the first code I wrote :

    #include <iostream>     // std::cout
    #include <cmath>    // std::sqrt

   int main()
    {
      float ss;
      ss= std::sqrt(120);  //in this line compiler not sure 120 is float or double
      std::cout<<ss;
      std::cin>>ss;
      return 0;
    } 

in this code, compiler not sure the parameter is float or double

we can just fix the code just to make sure which type of the parameter is, either float or double as follow :

    #include <iostream>     // std::cout
    #include <cmath>    // std::sqrt

    int main()
    {
      float ss;  //you can change to double 
      ss=120;    //this line make compiler sure 120 is float 
      ss=std::sqrt(ss); //in this line compiler sure that sqrt function 
      std::cin>>ss;
      return 0;
    }
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